The Mandalorian

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The Mandalorian
The Mandalorian logo.jpg
Genre
Created byJon Favreau
Based onStar Wars
by George Lucas
Written by
Directed by
StarringPedro Pascal
Composer(s)Ludwig Göransson
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons1
No. of episodes8 (list of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s)
Production location(s)Los Angeles, California
Cinematography
Editor(s)
Running time31–46 minutes
Production company(s)
DistributorDisney Media Distribution
Release
Original networkDisney+
Original releaseNovember 12, 2019 (2019-11-12) –
present (present)
External links
Website

The Mandalorian, also known as Star Wars: The Mandalorian, is an American space Western web television series created by Jon Favreau and released on Disney+. It is the first live action series in the Star Wars franchise. Set five years after the events of Return of the Jedi and 25 years prior to the events of The Force Awakens, it follows the title character Din Djarin —a Mandalorian bounty hunter—and his exploits beyond the reaches of the New Republic.

Favreau also serves as head writer and showrunner, as well as executive producer, alongside Dave Filoni, Kathleen Kennedy, and Colin Wilson. The Mandalorian premiered with the launch of Disney+ on November 12, 2019, with its eight-episode first season. A second season has been ordered, which is set to premiere in October 2020. The series has received positive reviews.

Synopsis[edit]

After the stories of Jango and Boba Fett, another warrior emerges in the Star Wars universe. The Mandalorian is set after the fall of the Empire and before the emergence of the First Order.[1][2][3][4] The series depicts a lone bounty hunter in the outer reaches of the galaxy far from the authority of the New Republic.[5]

Cast and characters[edit]

Starring[edit]

  • Pedro Pascal as The Mandalorian / Din Djarin, a lone gunfighter and bounty hunter who is sometimes referred to as "Mando" (a generic - and possibly offensive[6][7] term used to refer to all Mandalorians). He is a "foundling" who was rescued at a young age by Mandalorians. Pascal has described his character as being Clint Eastwood–esque with advanced combat skills and of "questionable moral character".[8]
  • "The Child" (performed by various puppeteers), a member of the same unnamed species as Yoda with similar Force abilities. The Child is a toddler at age 50. A bounty is offered for his return by "The Client." He is found and protected by the Mandalorian while being targeted by other bounty hunters.

Co-starring[edit]

The following actors received co-starring billing in the main end credits of the episodes they appeared in:

  • Carl Weathers as Greef Karga, an ex-magistrate and leader of a bounty hunter guild who hires the Mandalorian to track a valuable asset.[9]
  • Werner Herzog as "The Client," an unnamed man with Stormtrooper bodyguards who arranges for the Mandalorian to track a valuable asset.[10]
  • Omid Abtahi[10] as Dr. Pershing, a scientist working for "the Client."
  • Nick Nolte as the voice of Kuiil, an Ugnaught moisture farmer who bought his freedom after being enslaved by the Empire.[10][11] Misty Rosas provided the motion capture performance of Kuiil.[12][13]
  • Taika Waititi as the voice of IG-11,[8] a bounty hunting droid who processes conversations in a precise and literal manner.[14] After attempting to kill "the Child" as its bounty, and being stopped by Djarin, IG-11 is re-programmed by Kuiil to protect the toddler.
  • Gina Carano as Carasynthia "Cara" Dune, a former rebel shock trooper-turned-mercenary from Alderaan who fought in the civil war for the Rebel Alliance.[9]
  • Amy Sedaris as Peli Motto, a cantankerous docking bay attendant and ship mechanic on Tatooine.
  • Jake Cannavale as Toro Calican, a fledgling bounty hunter looking to join the bounty hunter's guild by capturing Fennec Shand. He hires the Mandalorian to help.
  • Ming-Na Wen as Fennec Shand, an assassin who crosses paths with the Mandalorian.[15][16]
  • Mark Boone Junior as Ranzar "Ran" Malk, an aging mercenary and leader of a motley crew looking to free a prisoner on a New Republic ship. Malk is a former associate of the Mandalorian from before he joined the guild.
  • Bill Burr as Mayfeld, a former Imperial sharpshooter and the point man on Malk's crew.
  • Natalia Tena as Xi'an, a Twi'lek member of Malk's crew and knife master, who claims to be Djarin's former love interest.
  • Clancy Brown as Burg, a large Devaronian member of Malk's crew who serves as the muscle of the team.
  • Richard Ayoade as the voice of Q9-0, aka "Zero", a droid member of Malk's crew.
  • Ismael Cruz Córdova as Qin, a Twi'lek and Xi'an's brother. He has a combative past with the Mandalorian.
  • Giancarlo Esposito as Moff Gideon, a former officer of the Imperial Security Bureau, the Empire's secret police, whose life changed after the Rebels destroyed the second Death Star.[14]
  • Emily Swallow as "The Armorer",[10][17] a Mandalorian woman who forges armor and equipment from Beskar steel, and enforces tradition among the surviving Mandalorians.

Guests[edit]

  • Julia Jones as Omera,[18] a widowed farmer on Sorgan who provides lodging for the Mandalorian during his stay on the planet.[19]
  • Isla Farris as Winta, Omera's daughter who bonds with the Child during his stay on the planet.[19]
  • Asif Ali as Caben, a farmer on Sorgan who, with his friend Stoke, asks the Mandalorian to protect his village against the attacks of Klatooinian raiders.[19]
  • Eugene Cordero as Stoke, a farmer on Sorgan.[19]
  • Rio Hackford as Riot Mar, a bounty hunter who engages the Mandalorian in a dogfight.[20]
  • Matt Lanter as Davan, a New Republic soldier.[21] Lanter had previously voiced Anakin Skywalker in Star Wars: The Clone Wars and Star Wars Rebels.
  • Dave Filoni as Trapper Wolf, a New Republic X-wing pilot.
  • Rick Famuyiwa as Jib Dodger, a New Republic X-wing pilot.
  • Deborah Chow as Sash Ketter, a New Republic X-wing pilot.

Horatio Sanz played a Mythrol bounty[22] and Brian Posehn played a speeder pilot in "Chapter 1: The Mandalorian".[23] Series creator Jon Favreau voiced Paz Vizla, an infantry Mandalorian featured in "Chapter 3: The Sin", physically played by stunt double Tait Fletcher.[24] Adam Pally and Jason Sudeikis played two bike scout troopers in "Chapter 8: Redemption".[25] Additionally, members of the 501st Legion were called in as stormtrooper extras.[9][26][27]

Episodes[edit]

No.TitleDirected byWritten byOriginal release date
1"Chapter 1: The Mandalorian"Dave FiloniJon FavreauNovember 12, 2019 (2019-11-12)
Five years after the fall of the Galactic Empire[28] a Mandalorian bounty hunter hands his latest bounty to Greef Karga. Then he accepts an under-the-table commission on the outpost world of Nevarro from an enigmatic client with apparent Imperial connections, directing him to track down and capture an unnamed fifty-year-old target. While the Client is indifferent to the target's well-being, his colleague Dr. Pershing insists the target be brought back alive. The Mandalorian is given a down payment of a single bar of Beskar steel, sacred to his people. He takes it to a covert Mandalorian enclave where an armorer uses it to make him a pauldron. Arriving at the planet of the target's last reported location, the Mandalorian is aided by a vapor farmer named Kuiil. Tired of the chaos that bounty hunters bring to the area, Kuiil leads him to the target's location and departs. Entering the remote and heavily defended encampment, the Mandalorian reluctantly teams up with bounty hunting droid IG-11 to clear the camp and find the quarry– a child of Yoda's species. When IG-11 attempts to kill the infant per its bounty orders, the Mandalorian shoots and destroys the droid, taking the Child alive.
2"Chapter 2: The Child"Rick FamuyiwaJon FavreauNovember 15, 2019 (2019-11-15)
While returning to his ship with the Child, the Mandalorian fights and kills a group of rival bounty hunters who ambush him. Nearing his ship, he finds it being stripped by Jawas for parts, and violently confronts them. When he tries to attack their sandcrawler, the Jawas stun him and drop him from its roof. The following day, Kuiil helps him locate the Jawas and negotiate for the return of his ship's components. The Mandalorian agrees to retrieve the egg of a rhinoceros-like Mudhorn in exchange for the stolen parts. He enters the Mudhorn's cave only to be hurled out by the angry beast inside, which attacks him repeatedly, damaging his armor. As the Mudhorn rushes in for the kill, the Child uses the Force to levitate the beast, allowing the surprised Mandalorian to stab and kill it. He collects the egg and takes it to the Jawas, who crack it open and eat its yellow insides. With the trade complete, the Mandalorian and Kuiil work together to repair the ship, allowing the Mandalorian to leave the planet with the Child.
3"Chapter 3: The Sin"Deborah ChowJon FavreauNovember 22, 2019 (2019-11-22)
The Mandalorian delivers the Child to the Client on Nevarro and collects the bounty of 20 bars of Beskar steel. Uncharacteristically, the Mandalorian asks about the Client's plans for the Child, but is told that it's none of his concern. He leaves before conflict arises. Returning to the Mandalorian enclave, the Mandalorian has his damaged armor replaced and weapons upgraded by the Armorer, who forges a full cuirass from most of the Beskar steel, while the remainder goes to support Mandalorian foundling children. The Mandalorian accepts a new job from Greef Karga and prepares his ship to depart. Feeling guilty, he turns back to attack the Client's base, killing most of the stormtroopers guarding it. He rescues the Child from Dr. Pershing's laboratory where it was being experimented on, but chooses not to kill the doctor. On the way back to his ship, the Mandalorian is ambushed by other bounty hunters and Greef Karga, who demand that he hand over the Child. He refuses, and a firefight breaks out. Outnumbered and cornered, the Mandalorian is able to escape only when other Mandalorians arrive from the enclave, attacking the bounty hunters and allowing him to reach his ship with the Child.
4"Chapter 4: Sanctuary"Bryce Dallas HowardJon FavreauNovember 29, 2019 (2019-11-29)
Arriving on the sparsely populated forest planet Sorgan, the Mandalorian encounters ex-Rebel shock trooper-turned-mercenary Cara Dune. Following a short brawl, Dune explains that she is hiding after taking "early retirement", and asks the Mandalorian to leave. While he prepares his ship, two desperate fishermen approach, offering to hire him to drive off a band of Klatoonian raiders. He accepts the job in exchange for lodging, using their credits to enlist Dune's help. At the village, they are housed by Omera, a widowed mother. The Mandalorian confides in her that no one has seen him without his helmet since childhood, when his tribe took him in as an orphan. Despite discovering that the raiders have an old Imperial AT-ST, the villagers refuse to leave, so the Mandalorian and Dune train them to defend themselves. They provoke the raiders at night, with Dune luring the AT-ST into a trap for the Mandalorian to blow up and forcing the remaining raiders to flee. With peace restored, the Mandalorian plans to leave the Child in the village, but a Guild bounty hunter tracks it down and is killed by Dune. Realizing that neither the village nor the Child would be safe, the Mandalorian departs with the Child.
5"Chapter 5: The Gunslinger"Dave FiloniDave FiloniDecember 6, 2019 (2019-12-06)
The Mandalorian defeats a pursuing bounty hunter in a dogfight. He lands his damaged ship at a nearby repair dock, run by mechanic Peli Motto in Mos Eisley on Tatooine. He seeks work in a cantina to pay for the repairs, meeting aspiring bounty hunter Toro Calican, who is tracking elite mercenary and assassin Fennec Shand. Calican needs to catch Shand to join the Guild, and the Mandalorian agrees to help when Calican offers to let him keep the money. They capture Shand in the desert, but she destroys one of their speeder bikes, so the Mandalorian goes to get a dewback they passed for transportation. While Calican watches Shand, she tells him that the Mandalorian betrayed the guild, making the bounty on him and the Child worth more than hers. Shand offers to help Calican capture the Mandalorian if he sets her free, but he shoots her instead and rides the remaining speeder bike to the repair dock, taking Motto and the Child hostage. The Mandalorian arrives, uses a flare to disorient Calican, and kills him. He takes Calican's money to pay Motto for the repairs, thanking her before leaving Tatooine. Out in the desert, a mysterious figure approaches Shand's body.
6"Chapter 6: The Prisoner"Rick FamuyiwaStory by : Christopher Yost
Teleplay by : Christopher Yost and Rick Famuyiwa
December 13, 2019 (2019-12-13)
The Mandalorian contacts his former partner Ran for work. Ran welcomes him to his space station and informs the Mandalorian that he needs his ship for a five-man job. He is joined by ex-Imperial sharpshooter Mayfeld, Devaronian strongman Burg, droid pilot Q9-0, and Twi'lek knife-expert Xi'an for a mission to rescue Xi'an's brother Qin, a prisoner of the New Republic. After infiltrating the prison ship, they fight through security droids and make it to the control room where the ship's security chief triggers a security beacon before being killed by Xi'an. The crew rescues Qin but double-crosses the Mandalorian. He escapes and defeats each crew member, then captures Qin. Q9-0 finds the Child after deciphering the archived transmission from Greef Karga, but is shot by the Mandalorian before he can harm him. The Mandalorian delivers Qin to Ran and departs with his payment. Ran immediately moves to launch a fighter to kill the Mandalorian, but discovers the New Republic beacon had been placed on Qin, leading a trio of X-wings to Ran's station where they attack. In the final scene, Mayfeld, Burg, and Xi'an are revealed to be locked in a cell on the prison transport, having been spared by the Mandalorian.
7"Chapter 7: The Reckoning"Deborah ChowJon FavreauDecember 18, 2019 (2019-12-18)
The Mandalorian receives a message from Greef Karga, whose town on Nevarro has been overrun by ex-Imperial troops led by the Client. Karga proposes that the Mandalorian use the Child as bait in order to kill the Client and free the town. In return, Karga will square things with the Guild, which would allow the Mandalorian and the Child to live in peace. Sensing a trap, the Mandalorian recruits Cara Dune and Kuiil to assist him, and Kuiil brings a rebuilt and reprogrammed IG-11 to protect the Child. They meet Karga and his associates, but are attacked by Mynocks. Karga is injured, but the Child uses the Force to heal his wound. In return, Karga kills his associates and confesses his original plan to shoot the Mandalorian and take the Child to the Client. Karga pretends that Dune has captured the Mandalorian, while Kuiil returns the Child to the ship. During the meeting, Moff Gideon's troops open fire on the building and kill the Client and his bodyguards, trapping the Mandalorian, Karga, and Dune inside. Gideon arrives, demanding the Child. In the desert, two scout troopers intercept the Mandalorian's communications and track Kuiil, killing him and taking the Child.
8"Chapter 8: Redemption"Taika WaititiJon FavreauDecember 27, 2019 (2019-12-27)
IG-11 rescues the Child from the scout troopers. Gideon warns Karga, Dune, and the Mandalorian that they face certain death unless they agree to assist him. IG-11 arrives and breaks the standoff but Gideon injures the Mandalorian. The Child uses the Force to deflect an attacking stormtrooper's flamethrower back on him. The Mandalorian sends the others through a sewer grate with the Child to find help from the Mandalorian enclave, while IG-11 removes his helmet to administer bacta to his head injury. Joining the others, the Mandalorian finds the covert group of Mandalorians dead or escaped, except for the Armorer. She tasks him to care for the foundling Child like his own, discover its origins, and return it to its kind. The Armorer fashions the Mandalorian his own signet and gives him a jetpack. The group is ferried down an underground lava river, but when they are ambushed by stormtroopers, IG-11 self-destructs to eliminate the enemy. Gideon attacks in a TIE fighter and the Mandalorian uses the jetpack to bring the craft down, but the Moff survives and cuts himself out of the downed ship with a dark sword outlined in white energy.[a] The Mandalorian leaves with the Child, while Karga and Dune stay behind.

Production[edit]

Background[edit]

A live-action Star Wars TV series entered production in early 2009, with over 50 scripts written by 2012, but they were deemed too expensive to produce due to their complex content.[33] Its title was to have been Star Wars: Underworld.[34] In January 2013, following the October 30, 2012 sale of Lucasfilm to The Walt Disney Company, ABC television network president Paul Lee spoke to the current status of the series commenting that "We'd love to do something with Lucasfilm, we're not sure what yet. We haven't even sat down with them. We're going to look at [the live-action series], we're going to look at all of them, and see what's right. We weren't able to discuss this with them until [the acquisition] closed and it just closed. It's definitely going to be part of the conversation."[35] In June 2014, more details regarding the series were revealed, including that Boba Fett would have appeared.[36]

Development[edit]

In 2019, Jon Favreau revealed to The Hollywood Reporter that he had first pitched the idea for what became The Mandalorian to Kennedy during the summer of 2017, while directing the photorealistic remake of The Lion King for Walt Disney Pictures.[37] Kennedy put Favreau in touch with Filoni, and when the two men met, Filoni began to draw doodles on napkins of what would become The Child.[37] After each day of work on The Lion King's virtual reality set in Playa Vista, Favreau would then stay late and work a few more hours developing his secret television project for Lucasfilm.[37]

On November 9, 2017, Walt Disney Company chairman and CEO Bob Iger, while on a quarterly earnings call with investors, announced that Disney and Lucasfilm were developing a new live-action Star Wars television series for Disney's then-unnamed upcoming streaming service.[38][39] On February 6, 2018, it was reported that Iger had revealed during another financial report conference call with investors that multiple Star Wars live-action series were actually in development by Disney saying, "We are developing not just one, but a few Star Wars series specifically for the Disney direct-to-consumer app. We've mentioned that and we are close to being able to reveal at least one of the entities that is developing that for us. Because the deal isn't completely closed, we can't be specific about that. I think you'll find the level of talent ... on the television front will be rather significant as well."[40]

On March 8, 2018, Lucasfilm announced that Favreau was the writer and executive producer of the forthcoming series.[41] In May 2018, Favreau stated that half of the scripts for the first season had been completed.[42][43] On October 3, Favreau announced that the series had been titled The Mandalorian and revealed the show's central premise.[5][44] The following day, it was revealed that additional executive producers would include Dave Filoni, Kathleen Kennedy, and Colin Wilson with Karen Gilchrist acting as a co-executive producer. Filoni was also expected to direct the series' first episode with additional directors including Taika Waititi, Bryce Dallas Howard, Rick Famuyiwa, and Deborah Chow.[45] On December 19, it was announced that Ludwig Göransson would compose the musical score for the series.[46]

On July 12, 2019, during a press conference for The Lion King remake, Favreau revealed that he had written scripts for the second season and that pre-production was underway.[47] Favreau plans to direct an episode of the second season, and stated that he was too busy with the production of The Lion King to direct any of the series' first season.[48] In an interview with Pedro Pascal, The Mandalorian's name was revealed to be "Din Djarin".[49]

Casting[edit]

In November 2018, it was announced that Pascal, Gina Carano, and Nick Nolte had been cast in starring roles.[50][51][52][53] After meeting with Favreau, Pascal initially thought he would be playing Boba Fett.[54] On December 12, 2018, it was announced that Giancarlo Esposito, Carl Weathers, Emily Swallow, Omid Abtahi, and Werner Herzog had joined the main cast.[10] On March 21, 2019, Taika Waititi was revealed to be recording a voice for the series, speculated to be bounty hunter droid IG-88,[55] but which turned out to be a new character named IG-11.[8] Footage shown at Star Wars Celebration in April 2019 revealed that Bill Burr and Mark Boone Junior were in the series, with Burr portraying an outlaw.[56] At the D23 Expo in August, it was revealed Ming-Na Wen would appear in the series.[16] Julia Jones's casting was announced in September.[18]

Filming[edit]

Principal photography for the first season began during the first week of October 2018 in Southern California.[57] On October 19, George Lucas visited the set of the series as a birthday surprise for Favreau;[58] it was later revealed that Lucas had some level of involvement in creating the show.[59] On October 25, it was reported that police were investigating the grand theft of several unspecified items from The Mandalorian's set at the Manhattan Beach Studios campus in Manhattan Beach, California.[60][61] Filming for the first season wrapped on February 27, 2019.[62]

According to Favreau, the first season was filmed on a large soundstage with a 360-degree video wall at Manhattan Beach Studios, supplemented by limited location shooting around Southern California.[63] The show sent camera crews to shoot distant locations like Iceland and Chile, the resulting digital assets were integrated into virtual sets built with the Unreal game engine from Epic Games, and those sets were displayed on the video wall.[63] In Favreau's words: "So, there is real photography being incorporated, but the actors aren't brought on location. The location is brought to the actors."[63]

Filming for the second season started by October 2019, with Dave Filoni and star Carl Weathers set to direct episodes for the season.[64] On December 5, 2019, Favreau confirmed that he already directed an episode for the second season.[65]

Filoni, who is mostly renowned for his work on other Star Wars projects, and Bryce Dallas Howard were given individual freedom on directing their episodes, which was surprising to Howard's father Ron Howard, who directed Solo: A Star Wars Story.[66]

When Pascal would become unavailable for filming, the Mandalorian would occasionally be portrayed physically by stunt actors Brendan Wayne and Lateef Crowder with Wayne having worked closely with Pascal to develop the character.[67]

Visual effects[edit]

Visual effects studio Industrial Light & Magic, a subsidiary of Lucasfilm, opened a new division in November 2018 targeted for streaming and episodic television called ILM TV. Based in London with support from the company's locations in San Francisco, Vancouver, and Singapore, it is expected that the new division will work extensively on live-action Star Wars television series, starting with The Mandalorian.[68]

Unreal Engine 4, a game engine developed by Epic Games, is used to create the digital backgrounds. It makes the rendering of the visual effects faster than would normally be possible for a live-action series, and Favreau said the technology can be applied to a variety of challenges. So rather than using sketches on a whiteboard to map out scenes, the storyboarding was done on the game engine.[69][70]

Music[edit]

The music for The Mandalorian is composed by Ludwig Göransson. Each chapter has its own soundtrack album, released the same day.[71][72][73][74][75][76][77][78] For the score, Göransson played many of the key instruments himself, and then added a 70-piece orchestra. He wrote four hours of music for the eight episodes.[79]

Release[edit]

The Mandalorian premiered on the streaming service Disney+ on November 12, 2019 in the United States.[80] It is available in 4K HDR, though analysis found its luminance to be well below typical HDR standards.[81][82] The second season is set to premiere in October 2020.[83]

Marketing[edit]

On October 4, 2018, the first promotional image from the series was released, featuring a Mandalorian with a rifle.[45] About a week later, Favreau released a photo through his official Instagram account featuring a rifle with a two-pronged barrel, an apparent callback to Boba Fett's weapon in The Star Wars Holiday Special.[84][85] Jon Favreau, Dave Filoni, and the main cast hosted a panel for The Mandalorian at Star Wars Celebration Chicago on April 14, 2019, where the first footage premiered to fans in attendance.[86] The first official poster and trailer were released at the D23 Expo on August 23, 2019.[87][88] A second and final trailer was released on October 28, 2019.[89] On November 11, a sneak peek was released during Monday Night Football.[90]

Broadcast[edit]

Disney+ releases The Mandalorian episodes on a weekly basis starting from November 12, 2019. The first two episodes were released only a few days apart on November 12 and 15, 2019 respectively.[91] The seventh episode was released on December 18, 2019 instead of December 20, in order to attach a sneak preview of Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, which came out on the latter date.[92]

Reception[edit]

Critical response[edit]

The Mandalorian (season 1): Critical reception by episode

The review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes reported a 95% approval rating for the first season with an average rating of 8.23/10, based on 15 reviews. The website's critical consensus reads, "Action-packed and expertly crafted—if at times a bit too withholding—The Mandalorian is a welcome addition to the Star Wars universe that benefits greatly from the cuteness of its cargo."[93] Metacritic, which uses a weighted average, assigned a score of 69 out of 100, based on 27 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[94]

Zaki Hasan of the San Francisco Chronicle said the show "in essence allows the franchise to take a mulligan with Boba Fett. Take the look, take that ineffable 'cool,' and transfer it over to an entirely new character who offers an untouched canvas, while giving the audience something that feels familiar." He added, "Three episodes in, that's really all The Mandalorian is: a feeling. A good feeling, mind you, but rather than any specific storytelling quality, it's that feeling you're talking about. The visual effects, the sound effects, the overall look of the thing is all bang-on. This is a polished production that shows off every cent of its feature film budget on every frame of its run time."[95] Writing for The Ringer, Micah Peters said, "The Mandalorian may already be difficult to care about as something more than an installment that exists solely to set up the next installment. But there are still many enjoyable things about it, and also it's a Disney show with spaceships and giant sea slugs, so it doesn't need to be Citizen Kane. It might, however, be the next great TV Western."[96]

IGN and Comic Book Resources have compared the basic premise of the series to Lone Wolf and Cub, which focuses on a samurai and his infant son.[97][98]

Audience viewership[edit]

Within four days of its release, The Mandalorian had stronger U.S. demand compared to four of 2019's biggest streaming originals: Netflix's The Umbrella Academy, When They See Us, The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance, and Amazon Prime Video's Good Omens. TV Time, a popular app allowing users to track shows and movies they are watching (or want to watch), stated that double the number of people compared to last week are interested in The Mandalorian, and noted that it had the largest gain of any TV show.[99]

Much of the social media reaction has been to the show's breakout character, a 50-year old "infant" of Yoda's species, who was kept secret until the series' pilot episode aired.[100] The Mandalorian initially takes "The Child" (the official name for the character) for a bounty, but ends up becoming its de facto guardian in order to protect it. It has been shown to have the powers of the Force, and has been affably nicknamed "Baby Yoda".[17] The unexpected popularity of "Baby Yoda" led to an explosion of unofficial merchandise for the Christmas and holiday season, which quickly sold out.[101][102][103]

Accolades[edit]

Year Award Category Nominee(s) Result Ref.
2020
Visual Effects Society Awards Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode Richard Bluff, Abbigail Keller, Jason Porter, Hayden Jones, Roy Cancinon (for "Chapter 2: The Child") Won [104]
Outstanding Virtual Cinematography in a CG Project Richard Bluff, Jason Porter, Landis Fields IV, Baz Idione (for "Chapter 6: The Prisoner"; The Roost) Nominated
Outstanding Animated Character in an Episode or Real-Time Project Terry Bannon, Rudy Massar, Hugo Leygnac (for "The Child"; Mudhorn) Nominated
Outstanding Model in a Photoreal or Animated Project Doug Chiang, Jay Machado, John Goodson, Landis Fields IV (for "Chapter 3: The Sin"; The Razorcrest) Won
Outstanding Created Environment in an Episode, Commercial, or Real-Time Project Alex Murtaza, Yanick Gaudreau, Marco Tremblay, Maryse Bouchard (for Nevarro Town) Nominated
Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Episode, Commercial, or Real-Time Project Xavier Martin Ramirez, Ian Baxter, Fabio Slino, Andrea Rosa (for "Chapter 2: The Child"; Mudhorn) Nominated
Art Directors Guild Awards One-Hour Period or Fantasy Single-Camera Series Andrew L. Jones (for "Chapter 1: The Mandalorian") Nominated [105]

Future[edit]

In November 2019, Walt Disney Studios chief creative officer Alan Horn stated that if the series is successful, a film featuring the character could be developed.[106] On December 5, 2019, when asked if characters from the series will appear in future Star Wars productions, Favreau said that "There's definitely the opportunity to explore these characters beyond what has been presented on the show", and that "There's a very fluid line between what's in the movie theaters and what's on the screen at home".[65] In February 4, 2020, Disney CEO Bob Iger said that spin-offs of The Mandalorian are being considered, stating that there is "the possibility of infusing [the series] with more characters and taking those characters in their own direction in terms of series".[107]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Giancarlo Esposito has said the weapon is the Darksaber,[29] a Mandalorian artifact.[30][31][32]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hall, Charlie (December 18, 2019). "Mandalorian is making sense of the time between Return of Jedi and Force Awakens". Polygon. Archived from the original on December 19, 2019. Retrieved December 31, 2019.
  2. ^ White, Brett (December 20, 2019). "Does 'Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker' Connect to 'The Mandalorian'?". Decider. Archived from the original on December 21, 2019. Retrieved December 31, 2019.
  3. ^ Katz, Brandon (December 5, 2019). "'The Mandalorian' Creator Opens Up About Baby Yoda and 'Star Wars' Crossovers". Observer. Archived from the original on December 28, 2019. Retrieved December 31, 2019.
  4. ^ Pometsey, Olive (December 9, 2019). "Everything you need to know about The Mandalorian". GQ Magazine. Archived from the original on November 22, 2019. Retrieved December 31, 2019.
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External links[edit]