The Maples (Rhinebeck, New York)

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The Maples
East elevation and south profile,
with front stone wall, 2008
Location Rhinebeck, NY
Nearest city Kingston
Coordinates 41°56′09″N 73°54′55″W / 41.93583°N 73.91528°W / 41.93583; -73.91528Coordinates: 41°56′09″N 73°54′55″W / 41.93583°N 73.91528°W / 41.93583; -73.91528
Area 1.7 acres (6,900 m2)
Built 1833[1]
Architectural style Greek Revival
Governing body Private medical practice
MPS Rhinebeck Town MRA
NRHP Reference # 87001092
Added to NRHP July 9, 1987

The Maples is a historic house located on Montgomery Street in Rhinebeck, New York, United States. It was built in the 1830s in the Greek Revival style. Three decades later its exterior was remodeled, adding some decoration in the Picturesque mode.

It is currently used for medical offices, taking advantage of the proximity of Northern Dutchess Hospital across the street. In 1987 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Property[edit]

The Maples is located on a grassy 1.7-acre (6,900 m2) lot, with tall shade trees, on the residential west side of Montgomery Street in the northern portion of the village, just across from the hospital complex. There is a shed to the rear, and a laid stone wall along the front of the property. Both are considered contributing resources to its listing on the National Register.[1]

The main house is a two-story, five-bay frame building on a raised fieldstone foundation. The gabled metallic roof has cornice returns and is pierced by four chimneys at the corners. The eastern (front) facade has a full-length flat-roofed veranda with cornice bracketry and scroll-sawn segmentally-arched knee braces. Small Palladian windows are located in the gable apexes on the north and south, with two quarter-round attic windows on either side.[1]

On the west is a large two-story wing added later. It has a gabled roof of lower pitch than the main block, and bracketed cornices on the north and south elevations. A small one-story shed-roofed wing projects from the north.[1]

The main entrance is centrally located, a recessed and paneled door flanked by fluted pilasters with Doric capitals. It leads to a center hallway where some original trim remains, including a late Federal mantelpiece in the southeast parlor and original woodwork on the windows. A curving stairase, also original, leads up to the second story. Most of the interior has been remodeled into office space and examining rooms.[1]

Outside, the shed to the southwest is a flushboard and clapboard-sided one-story frame building. Its gabled roof is trimmed with a scalloped pattern. The stone wall in front with central gate posts is also an original feature of the property.[1]

History[edit]

There is little in the historical record on the house's builders and original owners. Local tradition has it that a farmhouse stood on the site in the early 19th century when it was sold to a Jeffrey H. Champlin. The house's construction date is established by its cornerstone. In 1850, a map of Rhinebeck shows Champlin still owning the house.[1]

In 1867, an H.E. Welcher is listed as the owner. It is believed that he was responsible for the Picturesque exterior renovations, a common trend in Rhinebeck at the time. Among the documented later owners was William Vincent Astor.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Todd, Nancy (September 1986). "National Register of Historic Places nomination, The Maples". New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved May 31, 2009.