The Meters (album)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Meters
Meters meters.jpg
Studio album by The Meters
Released May 1969
Recorded 1969
Genre Funk
Length 43:05
Label Josie (JOS-4010)
Producer Allen Toussaint, Marshall Sehorn
The Meters chronology
The Meters
(1969)
Look-Ka Py Py
(1969)
Album's back cover depicting band members in 1969. Left to right: Modeliste, Neville, Porter, Nocentelli.
Album's back cover depicting band members in 1969. Left to right: Modeliste, Neville, Porter, Nocentelli.

The Meters is the debut studio album by the American funk group The Meters. It was released in May 1969 and is the first of eight albums by the band. The band's early works were developed through improvisation.[1] Band members had spent most of the 1960s performing together in nightclubs of New Orleans. They had a fluid musical style that included elements of R&B, rock and jazz.[1][2]

Background[edit]

The first track "Cissy Strut" was the band's opening song during their residency at the Ivanhoe night club in late 1960s. The original melody was introduced by Leo Nocentelli. At the time the song did not have a name and the band's name was Art Neville and the Neville Sounds.[3](p2) The song was recorded at the Cosimo Studios.[3](p1) It was first released as a single and sold 200,000 copies in two weeks. Its commercial success became an impetus for the band's name change and subsequent recording career.[3](p2)

The variety of instruments on the album-cover symbolizes the diversity of compositions and rhythms.[4](p199) The album's back-cover depicts the band members in the early phase of their career. Many of the band's early instrumental tracks were named only after they were recorded. The album's eighth track was named for the 6V6 vacuum tube – a tube used in guitar amplifiers.[5][6]

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 3/5 stars[7]
Revive Music Positive[8]
Vermont Review Positive[9]

A review by AllMusic noted the music's simplicity and nuance and called it "impressive".[7] Tamara Davidson of Revive Music had a positive review and stated "the album is filled with infectious grooves, filthy bass lines, and revolutionary drum rhythms."[8] According to Brian Knight of The Vermont Review, the album "set the pace for both the Meters and the entire New Orleans funk sound."[9]

Jeff Chang described the band in relation to the cultural backdrop of the 1960s, their influences, and their influence on music. He wrote: "Modeliste once described the songs as 'soundbites,' as 'entries of different grooves and different ideas about groove.' Indeed, they could fill a jam-band encyclopedia, hundreds of little ideas that could each be stretched out like twenty-minute rubber bands."[4](p206)

Track listing[edit]

All tracks written by Art Neville, Ziggy Modeliste, Leo Nocentelli and George Porter, Jr., except as noted.

No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. "Cissy Strut"   3:06
2. "Here Comes the Meter Man"   2:55
3. "Cardova"   4:35
4. "Live Wire"   2:40
5. "Art"   2:35
6. "Sophisticated Cissy"   2:56
7. "Ease Back"   3:14
8. "6V6 LA"   2:26
9. "Sehorn's Farm"   2:31
10. "Ann"   2:46
11. "Stormy" Buddy Buie, J.R. Cobb 3:40
12. "Sing a Simple Song" Sly Stone 3:06
2001 CD bonus tracks
No. Title Length
13. "The Look of Love" (Burt Bacharach, Hal David) 3:39
14. "Soul Machine" 3:28

Personnel[edit]

Credits adapted from AllMusic.[10]

Production

Charts[edit]

Weekly charts
Chart (1969) Peak
position
US R&B Albums (Billboard)[11] 23
US Billboard 200[11] 108
Singles
Title Year Peak chart positions Album
US
[11]
R&B
[11]
"Cissy Strut" 1969 23 4 The Meters
"Sophisticated Cissy" 34 7
"Ease Back" 61 20

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Dave Thompson (2001). Funk, Third Ear: The Essential Listening Companion. Hal Leonard. pp. 164–169. ISBN 9780879306298. Retrieved November 15, 2015. 
  2. ^ Grace Lichtenstein; Laura Dankner (1993). Musical Gumbo: The Music of New Orleans. W.W. Norton. pp. 153–160. ISBN 9780393034684. Retrieved November 15, 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c Randy Ray (January 25, 2011). "Leo Nocentelli and That Original Spark". jambands.com. Archived from the original on May 4, 2011. Retrieved December 21, 2016.  Archive page 2
  4. ^ a b Jeff Chang (2007). Phil Freeman, ed. Marooned: The Next Generation of Desert Island Discs. Da Dapo Press. pp. 195–208. ISBN 9780306816406. Retrieved July 26, 2016. 
  5. ^ Bryan Wawzenek (July 16, 2010). "The Gibson Interview – Leo Nocentelli of The Meters". Gibson.com. Archived from the original on May 15, 2016. Retrieved December 20, 2016. 
  6. ^ 6V6 tube:
  7. ^ a b "Allmusic – The Meters album – review". allmusic.com. Archived from the original on April 16, 2015. Retrieved March 10, 2011. 
  8. ^ a b Tamara Davidson (September 13, 2011). "The Meters, Self-Titled Album". Revive Music. Archived from the original on November 15, 2015. Retrieved November 15, 2015. 
  9. ^ a b Brian Knight. "Get Dazed by the Meters". The Vermont Review. Archived from the original on November 10, 2004. Retrieved November 15, 2015. 
  10. ^ "Allmusic – The Meters album – credits". allmusic.com. Archived from the original on November 15, 2015. Retrieved November 15, 2015. 
  11. ^ a b c d Dave Thompson (2001). Funk, Third Ear: The Essential Listening Companion. Hal Leonard. pp. 167–168. ISBN 9780879306298.