The Methodist Church by Barnes Pond

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The Methodist Church by Barnes Pond
Barnes Methodist Church
51°28′18.6″N 0°14′47.6″W / 51.471833°N 0.246556°W / 51.471833; -0.246556Coordinates: 51°28′18.6″N 0°14′47.6″W / 51.471833°N 0.246556°W / 51.471833; -0.246556
Country United Kingdom
Denomination Methodist
Website www.barnesmethodistchurch.org.uk
Architecture
Architect(s) W J Morley & Son[1] (1906); David Ensom (2005 conversion)[2]
Administration
Diocese Richmond and Hounslow Methodist Circuit
Clergy
Minister(s) Rev. Nicola Morrison[3]

The Methodist Church by Barnes Pond (commonly known as Barnes Methodist Church) is a Methodist church in Station Road, Barnes, London. It is affiliated with the Churches Together in Barnes and Churches Together in Mortlake and East Sheen.[4]

History[edit]

The building, in red brick, dates from 1906.[5] It was founded as a Wesleyan church,[6] superseding a Wesleyan chapel standing between nos. 77 and 79 White Hart Lane.[7] That building is now Barnes Healing Church.

The church was designed by William James Morley (1847–1930)[8] and his son Eric (born 1884[9]), who became a partner of the Bradford architectural firm W J Morley & Son in 1901.[1][10]

Church services were originally held on the ground floor, with gallery space above. Renovations undertaken in 2005 by architect David Ensom split the space into two floors. Service are now held on the first floor, and the ground level has meeting rooms, a kitchen, offices, and lavatories. The two spaces are connected by stairs and a lift.[2]

Services[edit]

Services are held on Sunday mornings and, twice a month, on Sunday evenings.[11] During every Sunday morning service there is a Junior Church option for children and also a creche.[12]

Music[edit]

The church has a Bechstein grand piano, which enables the Church to be used as a concert venue,[13] and a Bevington pipe organ, purchased in 1926.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Local architects" (PDF). Barnes and Mortake History Society. Retrieved 9 April 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Wendy Kyrle-Pope (November–December 2005). "Methodist Church Reopening". Barnes in Common. Churches Together in Barnes. Retrieved 8 May 2015. 
  3. ^ "Welcome". The Methodist Church by Barnes Pond. Retrieved 29 March 2013. 
  4. ^ "Find us". The Methodist Church by Barnes Pond. Retrieved 30 March 2013. 
  5. ^ Bridget Cherry and Nikolaus Pevsner (1983). The Buildings of England – London 2: South. London: Penguin Books. p. 469. ISBN 0-14-0710-47-7. 
  6. ^ "Methodist Heritage". The Methodist Church by Barnes Pond. Retrieved 30 March 2013. 
  7. ^ "Notes on Barnes, Surrey". History of Barnes, Surrey. Genealogy.com. Archived from the original on 22 October 2012. Retrieved 8 May 2015. 
  8. ^ "William James Morley". Dictionary of Scottish Architects. 2008. Retrieved 9 April 2013. 
  9. ^ "Eric Morley". Dictionary of Scottish Architects. 2008. Retrieved 9 April 2013. 
  10. ^ "W J Morley & Son". Dictionary of Scottish Architects. 2008. Retrieved 9 April 2013. 
  11. ^ "Worship on Sundays". The Methodist Church by Barnes Pond. Retrieved 29 March 2013. 
  12. ^ "For Children". The Methodist Church by Barnes Pond. Retrieved 30 March 2013. 
  13. ^ "Jad and Julian Azkoul". Barnes Music Society. Retrieved 29 March 2013. 
  14. ^ "Music at Barnes". The Methodist Church by Barnes Pond. Retrieved 29 March 2013. 

Further reading[edit]

  • The Church by the Pond: The First 100 Years of Barnes Methodist Church 1906–2006, The Methodist Church by Barnes Pond (2006)

External links[edit]

Media related to Barnes Methodist Church at Wikimedia Commons