The Muffs (album)

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The Muffs
The-Muffs-album.jpg
Studio album by
ReleasedMay 11, 1993
GenrePunk rock, pop punk
Length41:05
LabelWarner Bros.
ProducerRob Cavallo, David Katznelson, The Muffs
The Muffs chronology
The Muffs
(1993)
Blonder and Blonder
(1995)
Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic4.5/5 stars[1]
Punknews.org4.5/5 stars[2]

The Muffs is the debut album by the pop punk band The Muffs, released on May 11, 1993 on Warner Bros. Records. The album contains the single "Big Mouth". "Everywhere I Go" was later used in a popular Fruitopia television commercial (the cassette version of the track is actually the demo; the band was torn between which version to release and ended up splitting the difference).[3]

Track listing[edit]

All tracks written by Kim Shattuck, except where noted

  1. "Lucky Guy" – 2:46
  2. "Saying Goodbye" – 2:16
  3. "Everywhere I Go" – 3:12
  4. "Better Than Me" – 2:48
  5. "From Your Girl" – 3:27
  6. "Not Like Me" – 3:08
  7. "Baby Go Round" – 2:47
  8. "North Pole" (Barnett) – 0:35
  9. "Big Mouth" – 1:51
  10. "Every Single Thing" – 2:22
  11. "Don't Waste Another Day" – 2:35
  12. "Stupid Jerk" (Mike Saunders) – 0:31
  13. "Another Day" – 2:16
  14. "Eye to Eye" (Shattuck, Vammen) – 3:30
  15. "I Need You" (Barnett, Shattuck) – 3:41
  16. "All for Nothing" – 3:20

Personnel[edit]

  • Kim Shattuck – Lead Guitar, Vocals
  • Ronnie Barnett – Bass
  • Melanie Vammen – Rhythm Guitar
  • Criss Crass – Drums
  • Korla Pandit – Organ
  • Rob Cavallo – Producer
  • David Katznelson – Producer
  • The Muffs – Producer

Reception[edit]

  • "There's a certain charm to the group's 3-chord riffing and primitive rhythms that seems to have most appeal when driving a vehicle beyond the posted speed limit on a hot, sunny day. But stretched over 16 tracks, the forced minimalism begins to wane in appeal." (Roch Parisien, Allmusic)[1]
  • "The Muffs is a powerful pop-punk album that has Ramones-styled power-chord rockers in addition to more laidback and soothing numbers. " (Matt Carlson, Billboard/Allmusic)[4]
  • "You'd have to reach all the way back to Blondie's Plastic Letters to find punkish power pop this endearing." (Jim DeRogatis, Chicago Sun-Times)[5][6]
  • "PERHAPS it's post-punk integrity that makes "The Muffs" such an uneven affair, but it's probably just incompetence. The debut album from this half-female, half-male LA quartet has its bristly moments - notably the 31-second "Stupid Jerk," a cover of an Angry Samoans rant." (Mark Jenkins, The Washington Post)[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Parisien, Roch. The Muffs at AllMusic. Retrieved April 6, 2011.
  2. ^ Cocksedge, Rich (July 2, 2013). "The Muffs - The Muffs (1993)". Punknews.org. Retrieved January 4, 2016.
  3. ^ Freek, Jim (Jan 20, 2000). "The Muffs - Hamburger (Sympathy for the Record Industry)". Phoenix New Times. Retrieved August 25, 2011. And practically everyone with a television set is by now familiar with the opening strums of "Everywhere I Go" (a.k.a. the song from that Fruitopia commercial), a morsel of jangly '60s pop that appeared on the Muffs' debut long-player but shows up here in a rawer demo version (which was actually released on the cassette version of that first album).
  4. ^ Carlson, Matt. "The Muffs - The Muffs". Billboard. Retrieved April 6, 2011.
  5. ^ DeRogatis, Jim (June 27, 1993). "Barbra Streisand Shows Regards For `Broadway'". Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved April 6, 2011.
  6. ^ ASIN B000002MJM, The Muffs
  7. ^ Jenkins, Mark (Jun 4, 1993). "Muffs: Sometimes On, Sometimes Off". The Washington Post. Retrieved April 6, 2011.

External links[edit]