TNW (website)

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TNW
The Next Web Logo.svg
Type of site
Technology news
Available inEnglish
HeadquartersAmsterdam, Netherlands
OwnerFinancial Times
URLthenextweb.com Edit this at Wikidata
CommercialYes
Launched10 June 2008; 13 years ago (2008-06-10)[1]
Current statusActive

TNW (The Next Web) is a website and annual series of conferences focused on new technology and start-up companies in Europe.[2][3][4] The Next Web company was established in 2006 by co-founders Boris Veldhuijzen van Zanten and Patrick de Laive in Amsterdam, Netherlands, and a technology news website of the same name was started in 2009.[2][5] TNW's reporting has been sourced by Wired, Mashable, and the Huffington Post, among others.[6][7][8][9]

On 5 March 2019, the Financial Times purchased a majority stake in TNW.[4] On September 6th, 2021, former CEO, Boris stepped down and handed to the Myrthe van de Erve who was the former COO.

According to de Laive, it took one year for thenextweb.com to reach 100,000 monthly visitors, and at June 2016 it was getting 8 million to 10 million monthly visitors.[2]

Conferences[edit]

TNW Conference
The Next Web Conference Logo.svg
StatusActive
GenreTechnology and Business
Location(s)Amsterdam
CountryNetherlands
Inaugurated2006
FoundersBoris Veldhuijzen van Zanten, Patrick de Laive
Attendance17,500 (2019)
Websitethenextweb.com/conference

Speakers at TNW Conferences have included Gary Vaynerchuk, Prince Constantijn of the Netherlands, and Robert Cailliau.[10][11]

In 2017, The Next Web's Amsterdam conference came under fire for making misleading statements, and having a lack of transparency about paying presenters for speaking appearances, and for having a gender gap in the number of its male and female presenters, and a gender pay gap in their compensation.[11].

In 2020 the event was fully online and for their 2021 event they held a hybrid and smaller event because of Covid-19 restrictions in the Netherlands.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "thenextweb.com – WHOIS, DNS, & domain info – DomainTools". whois.DomainTools.com. WHOIS. Retrieved 14 October 2020.
  2. ^ a b c Thomas, Aby Sam (12 June 2016). "Staying on top of Generation-T: The Next Web co-founder Patrick de Laive". www.Entrepreneur.com. Entrepreneur. Retrieved 20 November 2018.
  3. ^ Davies, Jessica (5 March 2019). "The Financial Times buys The Next Web to beef up live events business". Digiday. Retrieved 2 June 2019.
  4. ^ a b Gross, Anna (5 March 2019). "FT acquires majority stake in The Next Web". www.FT.com. Financial Times. Retrieved 2 June 2019.
  5. ^ "Top 6 takeaways from The Next Web". OpenCampus.NewSchool.edu. The New School – Open Campus. Retrieved 20 November 2018.
  6. ^ Thompson, Rachel (26 January 2018). "Here's why your Instagram and Facebook feeds are looking bare this morning". Mashable.com. Mashable. Retrieved 20 November 2018.
  7. ^ "Security news this week". Wired. Wired. 17 November 2018. Retrieved 20 November 2018.
  8. ^ Emerson, Ramona (4 January 2012). "Silicon Valley Ryan Gosling: 'Hey Girl' meme goes tech". www.HuffingtonPost.com. Huffington Post. Retrieved 20 November 2018.
  9. ^ "Google's new podcast app for Android comes built into Search and Assistant". Firstpost. 24 April 2018. Retrieved 20 November 2018.
  10. ^ "HRH Prince Constantijn of the Netherlands". www.CES.tech. Consumer Electronics Show. Retrieved 20 November 2018.
  11. ^ a b Ehrenkranz, Melanie (15 March 2017). "The 'Next Web' tech conference is under fire for stiffing speakers". www.Mic.com. Mic. Retrieved 14 October 2020.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]