The River of Consciousness

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The River of Consciousness
The River of Consciousness.jpg
First edition (US)
AuthorOliver Sacks
CountryUnited States
PublishedOctober 2017
PublisherPan Macmillan (UK)
Knopf (US)
Media typePrint (hardcover)
Pages237
ISBN978-0-804-17100-7

The River of Consciousness is a collection of ten essays by the writer, naturalist, and neurologist Oliver Sacks.[1] Some of the essays are dedicated to specific figures such as Darwin, Freud, and William James.

Synopsis[edit]

The River of Consciousness compiles the following essays:

  1. Darwin and the Meaning of Flowers
  2. Speed
  3. Sentience: The Mental Lives of Plants and Worms
  4. The Other Road: Freud as a Neurologist
  5. The Fallibility of Memory
  6. Mishearings
  7. The Creative Self
  8. A General Feeling of Disorder
  9. The River of Consciousness
  10. Scotoma: Forgetting and Neglect in Science

Reception[edit]

The Chicago Tribune reviewed The River of Consciousness, Praising Sacks' "ability to braid wide reading".[2] In a review for the Wall Street Journal Laura J. Snyder notes that the volume "reminds us, in losing Sacks we lost a gifted and generous storyteller.”[3] In a review published by The Guardian the physician Gavin Francis writes: For those thousands of correspondents, The River of Consciousness will feel like a reprieve – we get to spend time again with Sacks the botanist, the historian of science, the marine biologist and, of course, the neurologist. [4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Trombetta, Sadie. "New Essay Collections For Your Fireside Reading This Fall". Bustle. Retrieved 26 April 2019.
  2. ^ Laidman, Jenni. "'The River of Consciousness' offers another glimpse inside the mind of Oliver Sacks". ChicagoTribune. Retrieved 26 April 2019.
  3. ^ Snyder, Laura. "Oliver Sacks Travels Down "The River of Consciousness"". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 26 April 2019.
  4. ^ Francis, Gavin. "The River of Consciousness by Oliver Sacks review – an agility of enthusiasms". The Guardian. Retrieved 7 December 2021.