The Settlers III

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The Settlers III
Settlers 3 cover.jpg
Developer(s) Blue Byte Software
Publisher(s) Blue Byte Software
Producer(s) Thomas Hertzler
Designer(s) Volker Wertich
Programmer(s)
  • Dirk Ringe
  • Volker Wertich
Writer(s)
  • Wolfgang Walk
  • Mark L. Barrett
Composer(s) Haiko Ruttmann
Series The Settlers
Platform(s) Microsoft Windows
Release date(s) Gold Edition
June 21, 2000 (2000-06-21)[2]
Genre(s) Real-time strategy
Mode(s) Single-player, online multiplayer

The Settlers III (German: Die Siedler III) is a 1998 real-time strategy video game developed and published by Blue Byte Software for Microsoft Windows. It is the third game in The Settlers series, following The Settlers (1993) and The Settlers II (1996). In early 1999, Blue Byte released an expansion, The Settlers III Mission CD, featuring new single-player campaign missions, new maps for both single-player and online multiplayer modes, and a level editor. Later that year, they released a second expansion, The Settlers III: Quest of the Amazons (German: Die Siedler III: Das Geheimnis der Amazonen), containing two new single-player campaigns, and additional single and multiplayer maps. In 2000, they released The Settlers III: Gold Edition, containing the original game and both expansions. In 2013, the Gold Edition was released on GOG.com under its North American title, The Settlers III: Ultimate Collection.[3]

In the game's single-player campaign, the player controls one of three races (Romans, Egyptians or Asians), who have been pitted against one another after the great god, HE, becomes dissatisfied with how the lesser gods are ruling. Quest of the Amazons tells a prequel story, and allows the player to choose from one of two campaigns; either controlling the Amazons against the other three races, or controlling the combined forces of the three against the Amazons. The game's mechanics represent a significant departure from the previous games in the series. For example, combat is more involved and strategic, with the player given direct control over their army; roads are no longer necessary to connect buildings, as all settlers can now walk freely around the player's territory; and the different races have different economic models, different magic spells, different war machinery, and several unique skills and abilities. The game was also the first in the Settlers series to feature an online multiplayer mode.

The Settlers III received mixed reviews, with the improved graphics and enhanced animations especially lauded. However, many critics felt the basic gameplay was too similar to the previous Settlers games, and the changes to the mechanics were not enough to fully differentiate it from its predecessors. The game was a commercial success, selling over 700,000 units worldwide.

Gameplay[edit]

The Settlers III is a real-time strategy game in which the primary goal in most levels is to build a settlement with a functioning economy, and produce military units so as to conquer rival territories, ultimately gaining control of either the entire map, or a certain predetermined section of it.[4] To achieve this end, the player must engage in economic micromanagement, construct buildings, and generate enough resources to build up their army.[5]

The game is controlled via a point and click interface, and can be played in one of three modes; "Single Player: Scenario", "Multiplayer" (via a LAN or online[6]), and "Campaign".[7] In Campaign mode, the player must complete a series of missions, the goal of most of which is to defeat the computer controlled opponents by gaining possession of their territory.[8] In the original release of the game, there were three separate campaigns of eight missions each; one campaign each for the Romans, Egyptians and Asians. The Mission CD expansion added three additional campaigns of eight missions for each race,[9] and the Quest of the Amazons expansion added two campaigns of twelve missions each; one in which the player controls the Amazons against the others, one in which they control the others against the Amazons.[10]

In "Single Player: Scenario" and "Multiplayer" modes, the player can choose from either a randomly generated or pre-built map, and then refine the type of game to be played in various ways, such as adjusting how much raw materials are available to each player at the start of the game.[5] The player can also select the type of game to be played, choosing from "Map Defaults" (the game is played with predetermined settings, based on the map chosen), "Teams" (the player can select any combination of teams and players allowing for up to twenty players; for example, three teams with six players on each team, or four teams with five players on each team) or "No Teams" (the player can choose from "League", in which players are ranked at the end of the game; "Free-for-All", in which each player/race competes against one another; "Free Alliance", in which players/races can ally with one another; or "Play Alone", in which there is only one player/race).[11] Introduced in the Mission CD was "Economic Mode", in which the goal is not to conquer the enemy, but instead be the first player to complete an economic based goal.[11]

Settlers and transportation[edit]

Screenshot of The Settlers III, showing the player's territory (the border of which is represented by red dots) at the start of a mission, with limited space and only a few buildings. The window on the left shows some of the buildings which can be built. At the bottom of the screen, in the centre, settlers are constructing a building. To the right are a small group of soldiers.

Whether playing Campaign, Scenario or Multiplayer, each game begins the same way; the player has a small settlement, a set amount of raw materials and tools, and a predetermined number of settlers.[5] The basic gameplay revolves around serfs (the titular "settlers") who transport materials, tools and produce, and who populate and perform the requisite task of each building.[7] In both The Settlers and The Settlers II, settlers automatically emerged from the player's headquarters as required. In The Settlers III, however, there are no headquarters, and new settlers can only be acquired by the construction of residences.[5]

At no point does the player directly control any normal settler - instead, general orders are issued to the settlers as a group (such as ordering the construction of a building), with the AI handling the delegation of orders to specific settlers. However, the player can control specialist settlers, of which there are three types; pioneers (extend the player's territory by digging at the border), thieves (scout enemy territory and steal resources) and geologists (test mountainous ground for raw materials). All three can be controlled by the player on an individual basis or as a group.[12]

A major change to the mechanics in The Settlers III is that players do not have to construct a road network. Instead, settlers can walk freely around the player's territory, with the AI handling pathfinding.[5] Like the previous games, however, The Settlers III has an adjustable goods' priority system, which determines the order in which items are transported.[13] Players can also build shipyards, which allow for the manufacture of both transport ships (can transport specialist settlers and soldiers) and trade ships (can transport items from a landing dock to a different geographical region).[14]

Races and economy[edit]

In the original game, the player could choose one of three races; Romans, Egyptians and Asians. Quest of the Amazons added the Amazons as a fourth race.[10] Each race has different buildings, different offensive weaponry, and a different economic model. For example, the Romans' and Amazons' construction industries require roughly equal amounts of wood and stone, the Egyptians' requires more stone than wood, and the Asians' more wood than stone.[15] Each race also has specific skills; for example, only the Romans can turn wood into coal;[8] only the Egyptians can build on desert terrain;[8] only the Asians can mine sulfur;[16] and only the Amazons can build war machines which use manna rather than physical ammunition.[16]

The economy is under the player's control throughout the game, and is adjustable in multiple ways. For example, the player can control the distribution of goods by selecting which percentage of a given resource is transported to a given building.[13] In a similar manner, the player can select what tools are made when.[13] Tool production is important insofar as all buildings require raw materials and a worker with the right tool. For example, if the player has built a fishery, and the building is still empty despite the presence of idle settlers, the inventory may show there are no fishing rods available. As such, the player will need to manufacture a fishing rod in the tool smith. The game also uses a notification system that alerts the player if a building cannot be occupied either due to a lack of the right tool or the absence of available settlers.[17]

A new feature of The Settlers III's economic model is "Divine Intervention", whereby each race can call upon their deities for economic and/or military assistance. To use Divine Intervention, the player must have both manna and priests (priestesses for the Amazons).[16] They then have finite access to a number of spells, the nature of which depends on the race.[18] These spells include, but are not limited to, tuning iron to gold, turning enemy soldiers to allies (Romans), turning fish to meat, starting forest fires (Egyptians), turning stone to iron, temporarily giving soldiers extra strength (Asians), turning gold to stone, and temporarily freezing enemies (Amazons).[19]

Military[edit]

The player's territory can only be expanded by using pioneers or building a military complex near the territory border.[7] Each complex must have at least one soldier garrisoned for the player's territory to expand. The player can also build a lookout tower, which can see for great distances, but doesn't grant new territory. To recruit soldiers, the player needs to build a barracks, with each individual soldier requiring their requisite weapon to transition from settler to soldier.[20]

In order for the player to attack an enemy building, they must click near that building with soldiers selected. If the player's units defeat all soldiers stationed in the building, they will occupy it, with the player's territory increasing according to the building's radius.[5] Defense of the player's military buildings is automatic; as enemies attack, any soldiers stationed in the building defend. Any nearby soldiers will also defend the building, unless ordered not to. When soldiers are fighting within their own territory, their strength is always 100%. When they are fighting outside, their strength depends on how much gold the player has in their stockpile.[21]

There are three classes of soldier: swordmen, bowmen, and spearmen.[22] Swordsmen are most effective against spearmen, bowmen against swordsmen, and spearmen against bowmen.[23] The strength of each recruited unit depends on the level of "Divine Promotion" which that class has reached, with each class requiring two promotions to reach the maximum level. Divine Promotion is contingent on how much manna the player has produced; to promote a class, the level of manna must be 100%. Once promoted, the level drops to 0%, and the player must wait for it to rise again before they can perform the next promotion.[24] Each race can also produce war machines; catapults for the Romans, ballistae for the Egyptians, cannons for the Asians, and war gongs for the Amazons.[25]

Plot[edit]

The game takes place "in ages past, when the pantheon was still home to countless gods from all empires." However, it is a time when the gods have lost their purpose, and are no longer respected by mankind. Jupiter is interested only in eating and drinking;[26] Horus thinks of nothing except his pyramids;[27] and Ch'ih-yu simply wants to be left alone to eat livestock.[28] The story begins in a temple dedicated to HE, the "Unknown God", and creator of all gods.[29] As the inferior gods waste time on their own obsessions, Q'nqüra, HIS messenger,[30] arrives with a summons. They go to see HIM, who tells them "for eons, you think only of pleasure, and now even the lowliest men say "these drunks don't do anything for us. Let's go over their heads to the boss"." HE is afraid this will lead to monotheism, which HE wants to avoid, as HE doesn't have the time (or inclination) to govern all of humanity himself. As such, HE commands each of them "to pick one who is the best of your people," and have him lead a war against the other two peoples. The losers will be punished by repainting the universe white. Jupiter picks Septimus Marius, a sea merchant; Horus picks Ramadamses, a sculptor; and Ch'ih-yu picks Tsu-Tang, a rice farmer.

Roman Campaign

Septimus Marius begins by putting down a rebellion amongst his own men. However, immediately thereafter, his highest ranking general, Remigius, betrays him, allying himself with a group of pirates.[31] Septimus defeats the pirates, but Remigius escapes, allying with a colony of Egyptians led by Ramadamses. A powerful group of nearby pirates, however, led by Flavius, decide to remain neutral in the conflict.[32] Septimus attacks Remigius, defeating him and forcing Ramadamses to retreat. Flavius then allies with Septimus, and they pursue Ramadamses to a small cluster of islands, several of which are controlled by the Asians, under Tsu-Tang. Using Flavius' fleet, Septimus is able to capture the islands, but shortly thereafter, a volcano erupts, decimating the newly established settlements. Ramadamses reoccupies the islands and forms an alliance with Tsu-Tang.[33] However, Septimus defeats Ramadamses, and Tsu-Tang betrays his Egyptian ally, destroying the remnants of his forces and enclosing the Romans.[34] Septimus is able to fight his way out of the trap, however, defeating Tsu-Tang, and achieving victory for Jupiter.

As Jupiter celebrates, Horus and Ch'ih-yu begin the task of painting the universe white, complaining that the competition was unfair because Jupiter cheated, and the punishment is unrealistic. However, when HE threatens to make them also clean up after Jupiter's celebration party, they reluctantly begin to paint silently.[35]

Egyptian Campaign

Ramadamses begins by defeating a tribe of nearby Egyptians. Celebrating the victory, however, Ramadamses is caught unprepared by Asians led by Tsu-Tang, forcing him to ally with a group of pirates.[36] Together, they force Tsu-Tang to retreat, but he remains a threat. As Ramadamses presses on, he learns of a group of Romans led by Septimus Marius who are rapidly expanding. A thunderstorm then destroys several of Ramadamses' colonies, forcing him to retreat, and allowing Septimus to advance.[37] Although Septimus and Tsu-Tang form an alliance, Ramadamses is able to disrupt their trade routes. Not yet strong enough to attack Tsu-Tang, Ramadamses must prevent his enemies from increasing their strength.[38] Eventually, the Egyptians attack Septimus, weakening him to the point where Tsu-Tang feels confident enough to betray their alliance.[39] The plan works, and Ramadamses is able to defeat Tsu-Tang, thus achieving victory for Horus.

As Horus celebrates, Jupiter and Ch'ih-yu begin the task of painting the universe white, complaining that the competition was unfair because Horus cheated, and the punishment is unrealistic. However, when HE threatens to make them also clean up after Horus's celebration party, they reluctantly begin to paint silently.[40]

Asian Campaign

Tsu-Tang begins by defeating two tribes of Asians, before facing a group of pirates allied with Ramadamses, who has a well developed settlement nearby. He defeats the pirates, and Ramadamses negotiates a fragile truce. However, both intend to violate it at the earliest opportunity.[41] Taking advantage of Tsu-Tang's focus on Ramadamses, the remnants of the pirates occupy some of his settlements, supported by a group of Romans led by Septimus Marius. Ramadamses and Septimus then form an alliance.[42] Tsu-Tang advances on them, but they encircle him, trapping him on a small strip of land. He rebukes their attacks, and quickly gains the upper hand, before planning a final assault.[43] He eventually defeats them, thus achieving victory for Ch'ih-yu.

As Ch'ih-yu celebrates, Horus and Jupiter begin the task of painting the universe white, complaining that the competition was unfair because Ch'ih-yu cheated, and the punishment is unrealistic. However, when HE threatens to make them also clean up after Ch'ih-yu's celebration party, they reluctantly begin to paint silently.[44]

Quest of the Amazons[edit]

Quest of the Amazons takes place several hundred years prior to the main game. It begins with Helios, Horus, Jupiter and Ch'ih-yu drinking in the 3 Gorgons tavern. Helios' son, Phaethon, recently died after he attempted to use the sun-chariot to impress women, but was unable to control the horses. At the encouragement of his friends, Helios is drowning his sorrows. However, unused to alcohol, he quickly becomes drunk, and is seduced by Medusa. Several years later, Medusa is "killed in a bar fight with Perseus," and Helios learns he had fathered a daughter, Q'nqüra. Raising her himself, Helios introduces her to HIM. She impresses HIM with her irreverence, and when she is of age, HE makes her goddess of the Azzi. She chooses Penthesilea as ruler, and awaits as they build up their strength, ready to strike out at the male tribes.

Amazon Campaign

The Amazons begin their quest when a group of Egyptians unknowingly colonise nearby, and Q'nqüra orders Penthesilea to destroy them.[45] Penthesilea then overruns a Roman encampment, and a sacred Asian mountain, prompting Jupiter, Horus and Ch'ih-yu to ally against the Amazons and ensure patriarchal rule. After their initial attacks are easily repulsed, they are able to disrupt Penthesilea's iron production, hence her ability to create weaponry, forcing the Amazons to retreat to a more fortified position.[46] Meanwhile, in the newly renamed 2 Gorgons, Jupiter, Horus and Ch'ih-yu meet to discuss strategy, unaware that the Gorgons, Q'nqüra's aunts, are spying on them, and feeding details of their plan to Q'nqüra, who in turn passes them on to Penthesilea. After gaining a foothold on an island inhabited by Romans and Egyptians, Penthesilea joins forces with a Roman tribe, whose governor has fallen in love with her, and whose iron ore she needs to get her weapon industry up and running again.[47] The Romans, Egyptians and Asians then decide to pool their remaining forces for one last offensive. However, Q'nqüra orders Penthesilea to surround them and attack. The men are defeated, and the Amazons prove victorious.

HE summons Q'nqüra to ask her what she wants from Horus, Jupiter and Ch'ih-yu. She tells HIM, "Nothing. We don't want men rampaging around like naughty children just because they can't have their way. After all, it's your world they would destroy." Her plan is for the "Amazons to release the men and become their willing servants. Through servitude, we will gain complete control, and the men will be none-the-wiser." Impressed with this idea, HE decides to make Q'nqüra HIS private messenger, to which she replies, "I will be your humble servant," with Helios commenting "In that moment, Q'nqüra, too, had won."

Three Gods Campaign

The game begins with the Romans under attack by the Amazons, and on the brink of defeat.[48] They barely survive, and the Amazons next attack the Asians and Egyptians in turn, prompting Jupiter, Horus and Ch'ih-yu to ally against the Amazons and ensure patriarchal rule. After several small victories, Horus masterminds a strategy to disrupt the Amazon's production of their magical war gongs. Meanwhile, in the newly renamed 2 Gorgons, Jupiter, Horus and Ch'ih-yu meet to discuss strategy, fully aware that the Gorgons, Q'nqüra's aunts, are spying on them, and feeding details of their plan to Q'nqüra, who is in turn passing them on to Penthesilea. The Romans, Asians and Egyptians launch an all-out offensive, although Helios worries that Q'nqüra's response is too subduced, and she must have some kind of plan. However, his concerns are ignored, as the others assure him that because their enemy is a woman, there is nothing to worry about.[49] Confidant that the Amazons are defeated, Jupiter leave Horus to fight on, whilst he pillages Egyptian and Amazon lands. Disgusted at this, Horus withdraws from the fight, and Jupiter, in a temper, sends a blizzard to cut off his troops, leaving Ch'ih-yu to finish the fight alone.[50]

As the men celebrate victory in the 2 Gorgons, HE summons Q'nqüra to ask how she was defeated, and she explains that she allowed the men to win. When HE asks why, she explains "for you. These gods and their peoples are just overgrown children. When they lose, their tantrums destroy, and it's your world they destroy." When HE asks her what her future plans are, she explains "if my Amazons are to deny themselves comparable conquests, then they will embrace the men instead. In this embrace, control will soon be ours, and the men will never know they've lost." Impressed with Q'nqüra's cunning, HE speculates "you might be just the god I've been looking for."

Development[edit]

The Settlers III was announced in February 1998 with a release slated for the fourth quarter of the same year.[51] At the time of the announcement, the game had already been in development for roughly twelve months.[52] In an interview in May 1998, Volker Wertich, creator of the original Settlers, and designer and programmer on The Settlers III, revealed the game would feature three races (Romans, Egyptians and Asians), each with their own unique aesthetic, economic model and abilities, explaining the development team had made the decision to have three races who were very different from one another, rather than having ten who were slightly different.[53]

At the ECTS in September, Blue Byte showed a demo of the game, showcasing the updated graphics, restructured combat system, and online support.[54] When asked about competition from Ensemble Studios' Age of Empires II, Blue Byte's PR manager, Marcus Beer, stated such competition was "the best possible support Settlers III could have had, as Age of Empires II is Settlers III without the humor." He also claimed that during the E3 event in May, the most frequent visitors to the Settlers III booth were the Age of Empires developers, who brought a video camera to record footage from The Settlers III demo.[55]

The Settlers III was notable for its method of copy protection. Using Blue Byte's own in-house copy protection system, Sysiphus, pirated copies of the game would seem to run perfectly, except the iron smelters would only produce pigs, making weapon production impossible.[56] In a press release issued by Blue Byte in January 1999, by which time the game had already sold 500,000 copies, producer Thomas Hertzler stated,

I knew it would do well, but was totally surprised by the quantity sold so far. Aside from the quality of entertainment The Settlers III provides, I think we can attribute partial success of sales to our copy protection. As is the case of many publishers, our sales in the past were affected due to non-existent copy protection, but our latest strict copy protection, Sysiphus, has certainly paid off. The quantity of pirated versions has been significantly reduced.[57]

Expansions[edit]

The game's first expansion was The Settlers III Mission CD, released in April 1999, and featuring three new eight-mission single-player campaigns, ten new maps for single-player mode, ten new maps for online multiplayer mode, enhanced AI for computer controlled races, and a level editor.[58]

In December, Blue Byte released a second expansion, The Settlers III: Quest of the Amazons, featuring ten new maps for single-player mode, ten new maps for multiplayer mode, an improved level editor, a new race (the Amazons), and two new single-player campaigns, one in which the players controls the Amazons against the other three races, and one in which they control the combined forces of the three against the Amazons. Blue Byte had been contemplating featuring a female tribe since the early stages of the game's development,[52] with their development manager, Erik Simon, saying of Quest of the Amazons, "fans of the series have been bombarding us for ages with requests to finally let female Settlers pit their skills against their male counterparts. The new Amazon race will no doubt introduce some turbulence into the previously male-dominated Settlers world."[58]

In June 2000, Blue Byte announced The Settlers III: Gold Edition. Containing the original game, the Mission CD and Quest of the Amazons, the Gold Edition also featured fan made maps for both single-player and multiplayer modes, online hints and tips, a new "Easy" difficulty level for single-player mode, and minor graphical enhancements.[2] The Gold Edition was released in North America under the title Ultimate Collection.[59]

Reception[edit]

Reception
Aggregate score
Aggregator Score
GameRankings 71%[60]
Review scores
Publication Score
AllGame 3.5/5 stars[61]
Game Revolution B-[62]
GameSpot 6.1/10[63]
IGN 6.9/10[7]

The Settlers III received mixed reviews, with an aggregate score of 71% on GameRankings, based on twenty-one reviews.[60]

AllGame's Nick Smith scored the game 4.5 out of 5. He praised the addition of online multiplayer mode, and the graphical improvements over The Settlers II, citing the enhanced detail and animations. His main criticism was that the overall gameplay felt too similar to previous Settlers titles, writing "the gameplay give may give Settlers veterans a feeling of déjà vu." He concluded, "This game can be heartily recommended to strategy gamers who have not played the previous Settlers games, but previous Settlers veterans might be a little disappointed."[61]

Game Revolution's Mark Cooke scored it a B-. He praised the intricacies of the game's economic system, writing the "level of complexity sets Settlers III apart from other real-time strategy games." He also praised the graphics and animations, but was heavily critical of the online multiplayer mode, which he called "a disaster." He concluded by referring to the game as "interesting and fairly innovative."[62]

IGN's Tal Blevins scored it 6.9 out of 10, writing "Settlers III is a good game, but there's nothing really new or innovative here." Although he praised the differentiation between the races, and the introduction of divine intervention, he felt "Settlers III has a slew of glaring problems which mar an otherwise brilliant game." Such problems include the inability to load a game without having to quit the current game and return to the menu, the necessity for disk swapping, the limited control of combat units, the inability to order individual settlers to perform specific tasks, poor AI, and the inability to access the online manual whilst playing. He concluded "Settlers III is an entertaining and brain-heavy game that is unfortunately hampered by a number of problems."[7]

GameSpot's Ron Dulin scored it 6.1 out of 10, citing "surface changes [which] make only a moderate improvement." He was especially critical of the similarity of the missions, writing "each mission is almost exactly the same. You start off with some supplies and must expand until you encounter an enemy." Although he praised the decision to remove roads, overall he felt the game didn't improve on its predecessors, and concluded "Settlers III doesn't really play much differently than Settlers II [...] Those who love the Settlers formula will enjoy it, but those who are unfamiliar with it will likely find it to be a moderately fun multiplayer game and an immensely repetitive single-player game."[63]

Sales[edit]

The game was a commercial success. When the Gold Edition was released in June 2000, the original game, the Mission CD and Quest of the Amazons had already sold over 700,000 units between them.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "The Settlers III". IGN. Retrieved June 15, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c Varanini, Giancarlo (June 21, 2000). "The Settlers III: Ultimate Collection". GameSpot. Retrieved June 16, 2016. 
  3. ^ "Release - The Settlers 3: Ultimate Collection". GOG.com. March 7, 2013. Retrieved January 13, 2017. 
  4. ^ Collins, Dale; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (1998). "Getting Started". The Settlers III Instruction Manual. Blue Byte Software. p. 12. Retrieved July 23, 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f Dulin, Ron (November 6, 1998). "Settlers III Preview". GameSpot. Retrieved July 24, 2016. 
  6. ^ Collins, Dale; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (1998). "Preface". The Settlers III Instruction Manual. Blue Byte Software. p. 4. Retrieved July 23, 2016. 
  7. ^ a b c d e Blevins, Tal (February 4, 1999). "Settlers 3 Review". IGN. Retrieved June 15, 2016. 
  8. ^ a b c Collins, Dale; Liebich, Sven; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (2000). "Campaign". The Settlers III Online Manual. Blue Byte Software. 
  9. ^ Collins, Dale; Liebich, Sven; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (2000). "Campaign (Mission CD)". The Settlers III Online Manual. Blue Byte Software. 
  10. ^ a b Collins, Dale; Liebich, Sven; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (2000). "Campaign (Amazon CD)". The Settlers III Online Manual. Blue Byte Software. 
  11. ^ a b Collins, Dale; Liebich, Sven; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (2000). "Additional Adjustments". The Settlers III Online Manual. Blue Byte Software. 
  12. ^ Collins, Dale; Liebich, Sven; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (2000). "The Settler Menu". The Settlers III Online Manual. Blue Byte Software. 
  13. ^ a b c Collins, Dale; Liebich, Sven; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (2000). "The Goods Menu". The Settlers III Online Manual. Blue Byte Software. 
  14. ^ Collins, Dale; Liebich, Sven; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (2000). "How do I use a trade ship?". The Settlers III Online Tips and Tricks. Blue Byte Software. 
  15. ^ Collins, Dale; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (1998). "Getting Started". The Settlers III Instruction Manual. Blue Byte Software. p. 16. Retrieved July 23, 2016. 
  16. ^ a b c Collins, Dale; Liebich, Sven; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (2000). "Buildings specific to one race". The Settlers III Online Manual. Blue Byte Software. 
  17. ^ Collins, Dale; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (1998). "Getting Started". The Settlers III Instruction Manual. Blue Byte Software. p. 13. Retrieved July 23, 2016. 
  18. ^ Collins, Dale; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (1998). "Getting Started". The Settlers III Instruction Manual. Blue Byte Software. p. 19. Retrieved July 23, 2016. 
  19. ^ Collins, Dale; Liebich, Sven; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (2000). "Priests". The Settlers III Online Manual. Blue Byte Software. 
  20. ^ Collins, Dale; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (1998). "Getting Started". The Settlers III Instruction Manual. Blue Byte Software. p. 14. Retrieved July 23, 2016. 
  21. ^ Collins, Dale; Liebich, Sven; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (2000). "Buildings of Heavy Industry". The Settlers III Online Manual. Blue Byte Software. 
  22. ^ Collins, Dale; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (1998). "Short Portraits". The Settlers III Instruction Manual. Blue Byte Software. p. 28. Retrieved July 23, 2016. 
  23. ^ Collins, Dale; Liebich, Sven; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (2000). "The Different Kinds of Troops and their Function". The Settlers III Online Manual. Blue Byte Software. 
  24. ^ Collins, Dale; Liebich, Sven; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (2000). "Soldiers: The Basics". The Settlers III Online Manual. Blue Byte Software. 
  25. ^ Collins, Dale; Liebich, Sven; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (2000). "Instruments of War". The Settlers III Online Manual. Blue Byte Software. 
  26. ^ Collins, Dale; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (1998). "Cast of Characters". The Settlers III Instruction Manual. Blue Byte Software. p. 30. Retrieved July 23, 2016. Jupiter: Lord of the Roman gods, Master of Thunder and Lightning - though due to gluttony and heavy drinking he's a bit out of shape now (in mind, body and behavior he could pass for Jerry Garcia). 
  27. ^ Collins, Dale; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (1998). "Cast of Characters". The Settlers III Instruction Manual. Blue Byte Software. p. 30. Retrieved July 23, 2016. Horus: The falcon-headed sun god of ancient Egypt. He's mighty proud of the pyramids. 
  28. ^ Collins, Dale; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (1998). "Cast of Characters". The Settlers III Instruction Manual. Blue Byte Software. pp. 30–31. Retrieved July 23, 2016. Ch'ih-yu: The dragon-like monster of ancient Chinese legends, he's been neglecting his historical role of marauder, except where large buffets are concerned. 
  29. ^ Collins, Dale; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (1998). "Cast of Characters". The Settlers III Instruction Manual. Blue Byte Software. p. 32. Retrieved July 23, 2016. HE: The Unknown God all the inferior gods (are supposed to) pray to. HE's a kind of company boss, whose employees are getting on HIS nerves because HE perceives them to be incompetent and toady. Unfortunately, there aren't any others better qualified. 
  30. ^ Collins, Dale; Walk, Wolfgang; Harding, Chris (1998). "Cast of Characters". The Settlers III Instruction Manual. Blue Byte Software. p. 31. Retrieved July 23, 2016. Q'nqüra: A scornful female with shape-changing abilities who was born to sneer. She schemes if she has to, and always acts superior to everyone, except HE, the Unknown God, whom she works for as a kind of executive officer. If she were to act the way she does on behalf of the Judeo-Christian God, she would have been thrown out of heaven. But HE is a bit more relaxed, and possesses an ironic sense of humor, so HE tolerates her evil character and uses it for HIS own ends. Which quite often involves her doing HIS dirty work for HIM. 
  31. ^ Blue Byte Software (1998). The Settlers III. Blue Byte Software. Level/area: Roman 2: After the War. Septimus Marius: I should have trusted my intuition, warning me of Remigius. I needed him, he was my best general; but alas, I fed a snake at my breast. Civil war now behind me, I look over what remains of my empire and resolve to begin again. Remigius fled with his band to an island in the north, and formed an alliance with a horde of pirates. 
  32. ^ Blue Byte Software (1998). The Settlers III. Blue Byte Software. Level/area: Roman 3: Northern Meetings. Septimus Marius: Roman pirates, under a strong leader named Flavius live on an island to the north. Flavius respects our strength, but I don't believe he fears us [...] The coward Remigius has found his last refuge in the distant northwest. The Egyptians, under Ramadamses, have settled to his east, and they are supporting him. 
  33. ^ Blue Byte Software (1998). The Settlers III. Blue Byte Software. Level/area: Roman 6: Volcano Island. Septimus Marius: We have been visited by fate...or divine wrath. We conquered the island group, and even managed to drive Tsu-Tang out of his two more northern islands when a volcano erupted in our midst, devastating all the islands in the north [...] Ramadamses took advantage of the disaster to advance from the northeast and occupy the island group. He then began assisting Tsu-Tang's beleaguered island and so forged an alliance. 
  34. ^ Blue Byte Software (1998). The Settlers III. Blue Byte Software. Level/area: Roman 8: The Merchant's Last Order. Septimus Marius: We have at last forced Tsu-Tang to show his assassin's face. At the first opportunity he swept Ramadamses' final refuge away with a wave of his hand. 
  35. ^ Blue Byte Software (1998). The Settlers III. Blue Byte Software. Horus: He got lucky and cheated. What chance did we ever have? / Ch'ih-yu: None [...] Painting the universe! What a stupid idea. If we ever reach the end, it'll be time to start all over again. / HE: Do I hear discontent? / Horus: What if you do? / HE: I am looking for someone to straighten up after the parade. / Ch'ih-yu: I wasn't complaining, I like my work. It was - / Horus: Shut up and paint! 
  36. ^ Blue Byte Software (1998). The Settlers III. Blue Byte Software. Level/area: Egyptian 2: The Loophole. During your victory celebrations, Tsu-Tang has overrun wide expanses of the island. It's going to be a long, hard battle taking it back. While seeking allies, you found a small Egyptian pirate colony in the southeast. 
  37. ^ Blue Byte Software (1998). The Settlers III. Blue Byte Software. Level/area: Egyptian 5: Into the West. Ramadamses: Whatever games the gods are playing, I wish they would stop. The advance to the west was in force - the conquest of the islands only a matter of time, when an unearthly thunderstorm shattered our three islands in the southwest. 
  38. ^ Blue Byte Software (1998). The Settlers III. Blue Byte Software. Level/area: Egyptian 6: The Northern Flank. Ramadamses: Against Tsu-Tang, I can only remain on the defensive. But the longer I can hinder his progress, the more his economic deficits bear down upon him. 
  39. ^ Blue Byte Software (1998). The Settlers III. Blue Byte Software. Level/area: Egyptian 8: The Hangman. Ramadamses: If Septimus and I join in battle, Tsu-Tang will certainly deal a death blow to the defeated, and then there will be only two. I must lead an attack against Septimus - it must be swift and hard. Hard enough to get Tsu-Tang to play the hangman I cannot...hard enough to give me a chance to hang the hangman. 
  40. ^ Blue Byte Software (1998). The Settlers III. Blue Byte Software. Jupiter: He got lucky and cheated. What chance did we ever have? / Ch'ih-yu: None [...] Painting the universe! What a stupid idea. If we ever reach the end, it'll be time to start all over again. / HE: Do I hear discontent? / Jupiter: What if you do? / HE: I am looking for someone to straighten up after the parade. / Ch'ih-yu: I wasn't complaining, I like my work. It was - / Jupiter: Shut up and paint! 
  41. ^ Blue Byte Software (1998). The Settlers III. Blue Byte Software. Level/area: Asian 3: Deadly Borders. Tsu-Tang: Ramadamses is an intelligent man, but that will not save him. He sacrificed the pirates in order to negotiate with me, because he believes his superior administration is enough to secure victory. Perhaps, but I know I am the stronger, and his trade only strengthens me more. As soon as we can survive on our own we will strike! 
  42. ^ Blue Byte Software (1998). The Settlers III. Blue Byte Software. Level/area: Asian 6: Fertile New Lands. Tsu-Tang: Septimus [...] is treating Ramadamses like a family pet [...] The allegiance won't help Ramadamses. He is already too weak, but it strengthens the Romans by the hour. 
  43. ^ Blue Byte Software (1998). The Settlers III. Blue Byte Software. Level/area: Asian 8: Endure to the end. Tsu-Tang: The time has come. We face the decisive moment. If I succeed, I will become invincible, and the Egyptians and Roman colonies will falter. If they fail to surrender, they will perish. 
  44. ^ Blue Byte Software (1998). The Settlers III. Blue Byte Software. Horus: He got lucky and cheated. What chance did we ever have? / Jupiter: None [...] Painting the universe! What a stupid idea. If we ever reach the end, it'll be time to start all over again. / HE: Do I hear discontent? / Horus: What if you do? / HE: I am looking for someone to straighten up after the parade. / Jupiter: I wasn't complaining, I like my work. It was - / Horus: Shut up and paint! 
  45. ^ Blue Byte Software (1999). The Settlers III: Quest of the Amazons. Blue Byte Software. Level/area: Amazon 1: Intruders. Helios: Horus had been chosen to become the first victim of the Amazons' might. His Egyptian colony had dared to settle on the Amazons' main island, and dear daughter Q'nqüra wasted no thoughts on peaceful coexistence. Penthesilea would drive the Egyptians out at all costs, and Horus would pay the bill. 
  46. ^ Blue Byte Software (1999). The Settlers III: Quest of the Amazons. Blue Byte Software. Level/area: Amazon 8: Beating a Retreat. Helios: Surrounded by Romans, it was only a question of time before her settlement could no longer be held, but Penthesilea did not shrink from battle. Q'nqüra came to her aide by locating an island surrounded by impregnable reefs, which could not be taken by sea. 
  47. ^ Blue Byte Software (1999). The Settlers III: Quest of the Amazons. Blue Byte Software. Level/area: Amazon 10: Brothers in Arms. Helios: I had been wondering why Jupiter no longer greeted me at the Gorgons, but then I learned that Penthesilea had lured a Roman faction to her side. It seems the Roman governor was as infatuated with her as she was with his iron ore. Of course Jupiter's rage fell hard upon the renegade settlement, and the Amazons were forced to come to their aid to protect the vital iron. 
  48. ^ Blue Byte Software (1999). The Settlers III: Quest of the Amazons. Blue Byte Software. Level/area: Three Gods 1: Romans. Helios: Jupiter was enraged. Not only were the Amazons poised to overwhelm one of his settlements at Q'nqüra's request, but it was beginning to look as if his subjects were incapable of defending themselves. When he finally managed to slip away for a goblet of wine at the Gorgons, he said they'd even become desperate enough to bother him with converting soldiers. 
  49. ^ Blue Byte Software (1999). The Settlers III: Quest of the Amazons. Blue Byte Software. Level/area: Three Gods 10: Onward Men!. Helios: My friends had taken to the offensive, but the response of dear Q'nqüra seemed far too restrained. My friends brushed my concerns aside with another round, reminding me that she was only a woman, and the more they drank the less of a threat she became. 
  50. ^ Blue Byte Software (1999). The Settlers III: Quest of the Amazons. Blue Byte Software. Level/area: Three Gods 12: Snowed. Helios: Horus was understandably furious at Jupiter. He declared that he was finished, having done more than his share, and told the others to be so kind as to bring the whole ordeal to an end. Ch'ih-yu, for whom the celebration of victory - with its roast ox - was quite an incentive, set to work immediately. Jupiter, however, sullen at never having wreaked havoc with a glorious deluge, declared that he too had done enough, and in any case certainly more than Horus. Sending an enormous blizzard forth, he cut off his Roman subjects from the outside world, then feigned powerlessness when Ch'ih-yu called for help. 
  51. ^ Jebens, Harley (February 2, 1998). "Blue Byte's plans". GameSpot. Retrieved July 24, 2016. 
  52. ^ a b "Interview with Torsten Hess". Siedler3.net. May 19, 1998. Retrieved November 29, 2016. 
  53. ^ "Interview with Volker Wertich". Siedler3.net. May 19, 1998. Retrieved November 29, 2016. 
  54. ^ "Can you stomach it?". PC Zone (62): 15. April 1998. 
  55. ^ "ECTS: Blue Byte Pumps Settlers III". IGN. September 8, 1998. Retrieved July 24, 2016. 
  56. ^ "History of DRM & Copy Protection in Computer Games". Lazy Game Reviews. October 26, 2012. Retrieved November 29, 2016. 
  57. ^ "Blue Byte Software Sell-In 500,000 Units Of The Settlers III Worldwide". Coming Soon Magazine. January 11, 1999. Retrieved November 29, 2016. 
  58. ^ a b "Settlers III Expands". IGN. April 7, 1999. Retrieved June 20, 2016. 
  59. ^ "Die Siedler 3: Gold Edition". Siedler3.net. Retrieved November 29, 2016. 
  60. ^ a b "The Settlers III for PC". GameRankings. Retrieved June 15, 2016. 
  61. ^ a b Smith, Nick. "The Settlers III Review". AllGame. Archived from the original on December 12, 2014. Retrieved June 15, 2016. 
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