The Sociological Review

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The Sociological Review  
Abbreviated title (ISO 4)
Soc. Rev.
Discipline Sociology
Language English
Edited by Sarah Green, Mike Michael, Michael Burawoy, Beverley Skeggs
Publication details
Publication history
Frequency Quarterly
ISSN 0038-0261 (print)
1467-954X (web)
LCCN 09007601
OCLC no. 505014828

The Sociological Review is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal covering all aspects of sociology, including anthropology, criminology, philosophy, education, gender, medicine, and organization. It is published by Wiley-Blackwell and is one of the three "main sociology journals in Britain", along with the British Journal of Sociology and Sociology, and the oldest British sociology journal.[1]

The Sociological Review also publishes a monograph series that publishes scholarly articles on issues of general sociological interest.


Established in 1908 as a successor of the Papers of the Sociological Society, its founder and first editor-in-chief was Leonard Trelawny Hobhouse. As the first professor of sociology in the United Kingdom, Hobhouse had a central role in establishing sociology as an academic discipline, and The Sociological Review became an important forum in this regard, and generally as a forum for new liberal theory of the early 20th century.[2]


The journal's founder and first editor, Leonard Trelawny Hobhouse

The following persons have been editors of this journal:

The current editors are Sarah Green (University of Helsinki), Mike Michael (University of Sydney), Michael Burawoy (University of California, Berkeley), and Beverley Skeggs (University of London).

Abstracting and indexing[edit]

The Sociological Review is abstracted and indexed in the Social Sciences Citation Index. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2013 impact factor of 0.789, ranking it 72nd out of 138 journals in the category "Sociology".[3]


  1. ^ A. H. Halsey, A History of Sociology in Britain, Oxford University Press, 2004, p. 183
  2. ^ Stefan Collini, Liberalism and Sociology: L. T. Hobhouse and Political Argument in England 1880–1914, Cambridge University Press, 1983, ISBN 0521274087
  3. ^ "Journals Ranked by Impact: Sociology". 2013 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Social Sciences ed.). Thomson Reuters. 2013. 

External links[edit]