Standard State Zoning Enabling Act

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"A Standard State Zoning Enabling Act" (SZEA) was a model law for U.S. states to enable zoning regulations in their jurisdictions. It was drafted by a committee of the Department of Commerce and first issued in 1922. This act was one of the foundational developments in land use planning in the United States.

Background[edit]

The zoning advisory committee that wrote the standard act was formed in the U.S. Department of Commerce in September 1921.[1] The then-Secretary of Commerce was Herbert Hoover, who was later elected U.S. President.

Summary[edit]

The SZEA begins with several explanatory notes.[2] The act itself is nine sections with annotations mostly describing the committee's choice of words.[3]

The SZEA was first issued in August 1922, re-issued in revised form in January 1923 and first printed in May 1924. More than 55,000 copies of the first printed edition were sold. A second printed edition was published in 1926.[4]

Legacy[edit]

The 1926 revised second printing noted that 19 states had passed enabling acts modeled on the Standard State Zoning Enabling Act.[1]

The American Planning Association wrote that the SZEA with the Standard City Planning Enabling Act of 1927 "laid the basic foundation for land development controls in the U.S.".[5]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b SSZEA 1926, p. iii.
  2. ^ SSZEA 1926, p. 1–3.
  3. ^ SSZEA 1926, p. 4–13.
  4. ^ SSZEA 1926, p. 3.
  5. ^ Meck 2002, p. 8-5.

References[edit]

External links[edit]