The Strip (1951 film)

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The Strip
The Strip - 1951 Poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by László Kardos
Produced by Joe Pasternak
Screenplay by Allen Rivkin
Starring Mickey Rooney
Sally Forrest
William Demarest
James Craig
Music by Pete Rugolo
George Stoll
Cinematography Robert L. Surtees
Edited by Albert Akst
Production
company
Distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release date
  • August 31, 1951 (1951-08-31) (United States)
Running time
85 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $885,000[1]
Box office $982,000[1]

The Strip is a 1951 film directed by László Kardos and starring Mickey Rooney, Sally Forrest and William Demarest. Much of the picture was shot on location in and around the Sunset Strip. Interiors were shot at popular nightclubs Mocambo and Ciro's and at restaurants Little Hungary and Stripps.[2]

Plot[edit]

Stanley Maxton (Mickey Rooney) is a drummer in the rhythm section of a night club orchestra. He is in love with cigarette girl, Jane Tafford (Sally Forrest), but she is more interested in a mobster reputed to have influence in the movie industry.

Cast[edit]

Production notes[edit]

The film is set against the backdrop of Hollywood's Sunset Strip, with Louis Armstrong, Earl Hines and Jack Teagarden appearing as themselves in the film. Pete Rugolo, who is credited with Leo Arnaud with the film's orchestrations, was a well-known jazz arranger.

Much of the picture was shot on location in and around the Sunset Strip. Interiors were shot at popular nightclubs Mocambo and Ciro's and at restaurants Little Hungary and Stripps.

Reception[edit]

According to MGM records, the film made $656,000 in the US and Canada and $326,000 elsewhere, resulting in a loss of $284,000.[1]

Critical response[edit]

Film critic Dennis Schwartz discussed the production in his review and praised the work of Mickey Rooney, "A minor mystery story that's given some high gloss in its production by the MGM studio system, as Louis "Satchmo" Armstrong and his distinguished band made up of Jack Teagarden, Earl "Fatha" Hines, and Barney Bigard serenade us with a few numbers and there are various other jazz pieces included from singers Monica Lewis and Vic Damone. It's set on the intriguing Sunset Strip where Mickey Rooney plays the sincere little guy, Stanley Maxton, a jazz drummer who is accused of murder ... The breezy story line, the snappy jazz interludes, and some engaging scenes made it very appealing ... Rooney is super as the perennial victim who only finds his soul when he's lost in his music. The film effectively captured the existential mood and the glee derived from the club scene on the Strip. It's an above-average mystery story that could be categorized as film noir because of Rooney's pained expression as a victim of love."[3]

Accolades[edit]

The song "A Kiss to Build a Dream On" was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Song. "In the Cool, Cool, Cool of the Evening," from the Paramount film Here Comes the Groom won the award.


The film is recognized by American Film Institute in these lists:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c The Eddie Mannix Ledger, Los Angeles: Margaret Herrick Library, Center for Motion Picture Study .
  2. ^ The Strip at the TCM Movie Database.
  3. ^ Schwartz, Dennis. Ozus' World Movie Reviews, film review, February 28, 2003. Accessed: July 28, 2013.
  4. ^ "AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs Nominees" (PDF). Retrieved 2016-08-05. 

External links[edit]