The Sympathizer

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Sympathizer
First edition cover
AuthorViet Thanh Nguyen
Audio read byFrancois Chau[1]
Cover artistChristopher Moisan[2]
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
GenreHistorical
Set inLos Angeles, Vietnam
PublisherGrove Press[3]
Publication date
7 April 2015[4]
Media typePrint (hardback & paperback), e-book, audiobook
Pages416 pp.[3]
AwardsPulitzer Prize for Fiction (2016)
Edgar Award for Best First Novel (2016)
Dayton Literary Peace Prize for Fiction (2016)
Center for Fiction First Novel Prize (2015)
Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction (2016)
Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature for Adult Fiction (2015)
ISBN978-0-8021-2345-9 (hardback)[5]
813/.6
LC ClassPS3614.G97 S96 2015
Followed byThe Committed 

The Sympathizer is the 2015 debut novel by Vietnamese-American professor Viet Thanh Nguyen. It is a best-selling novel,[6] and recipient of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. The novel received generally positive acclaim from critics,[7] it was named on more than 30 best book of the year lists and a New York Times Editor's Choice.[8]

The novel incorporates elements from a number of different novel genres: mystery, political, metafiction,[9] dark comedic,[10] historical, spy, and war.[11] The story depicts the anonymous narrator, a North Vietnamese mole in the South Vietnamese army, who stays embedded in a South Vietnamese community in exile in the United States. While in the United States, the narrator describes being an expatriate and a cultural advisor on the filming of an American film, closely resembling Platoon and Apocalypse Now, before returning to Vietnam as part of a guerrilla raid against the communists.

The dual identity of the narrator, as a mole and immigrant, and the Americanization of the Vietnam War in international literature are central themes in the novel. The novel was published 40 years to the month after the fall of Saigon, which is the initial scene of the book.[12]

A sequel, titled The Committed, was published on March 2, 2021.[13]

Plot[edit]

Set as the flashback in a coerced confession of a political prisoner, the book tells the story of the South Vietnamese Government in 1975 and subsequent events in American exile in Los Angeles, through the eyes of a half-Vietnamese, half-French undercover communist agent.[14] The spy remains unnamed throughout the novel from the fall of Saigon, to refugee camps and relocation in Los Angeles, to his time as a film consultant in the Philippines, and finally to his return and subsequent imprisonment in Vietnam.

The narrator lives in a series of dualities, at times contradictions: he is of mixed blood descent (Vietnamese mother, and French Catholic priest father), raised in Vietnam but attended college in the U.S.,[15] and a North Vietnamese mole yet a friend to South Vietnamese military officials and soldiers and a United States CIA agent. During the imminent fall of Saigon, he, as an aide-de-camp, arranges for a last minute flight as part of Operation Frequent Wind, to secure the safety of himself, his best friend Bon, and the General he advises. While they are being evacuated, the group is fired upon while boarding; during the escape, Bon's wife and child are killed along with many others.

In Los Angeles, the General and his former officers weaken quickly, disillusioned by a foreign culture and their rapid decline in status. The General attempts to reclaim some semblance of honor by opening his own business, a liquor store. The continuous emasculation and dehumanization within American society prompts the General to draft plans for assembling an army of South Vietnamese expatriates to return as rebels to Vietnam. While participating in the expatriate unit, the narrator takes a clerical position at Occidental College, begins having an affair with Ms. Mori, his Japanese-American colleague, and then the General's eldest daughter, Lana. While living in the United States, the narrator sends letters in invisible ink to Man, a North Vietnamese revolutionary and handler, providing intelligence about the General's attempts at raising a commando army.

When he receives an offer to consult for a Hollywood film on the Vietnam War called The Hamlet, he sees it as an opportunity to show multiple sides of the War and to give the Vietnamese a voice in its historical portrayal. However, working on set in the Philippines, he not only fails to complicate the misleading, romantically American representation of the war, but almost dies when explosives detonate long before they should. There is skepticism as to whether the explosion was a mistake since the director greatly dislikes the narrator.

After he recovers, against Man's insistence that he stay in the U.S. and continue his work as a mole, the narrator decides to accompany the exiled troops back into Vietnam. Before he returns, he executes a left-leaning Vietnamese newspaper editor, "Sonny", who he learns had an affair with Ms. Mori while the narrator was in the Philippines. During his mission in Vietnam, he manages to barely save Bon's life. However, it is to no heroic avail as they are captured and imprisoned.

The encampment is where the protagonist writes his confession, a plea for absolution addressed to the commandant who is directed by the commissar. However, rather than writing what his communist comrades wish to hear, the protagonist writes a complex and nuanced reflection of the events that have led him to his imprisonment. He refuses to show only one side, he leaves nothing out (even his painful memories of a childhood without a father or of his first experience masturbating), and he sympathizes with the many perspectives of a complicated conflict that has divided a nation. While he still considers himself a communist and revolutionary, he acknowledges his friendships with those who are supposedly his enemy and he understands all soldiers as honorably fighting for their home. When his confession drafts are rejected, he is finally brought before the commissar.

The commissar, the man with no face, turns out to be his direct superior Man. Yet, this does not stop Man from subjecting him to torture as part of his reeducation. First, he must admit his crime of being complicit in the torturing and raping of a female communist agent. Then he must realize that he took part, albeit unconsciously, in the murder of his father. Lastly, he must learn Man's final lesson that a revolution fought for independence and freedom could make those things worth less than nothing, that nothingness itself was more precious than independence and freedom. The novel ends with the narrator among a crowd of boat people at sea.

Style[edit]

Almost every review comments on the most distinctive stylistic feature: the anonymous narrator who provides continuous commentary. The narrator has an "acrobatic ability" that guides the reader through the contradictions of the war and American identity.[10] The first person narration derives from the frame context for the book: a confession by the narrator to communist captors trying to make him account for his exile.[16] The communist captors force him to write and rewrite the narrative, in an attempt to correct his ideological lens on America and the South Vietnamese enemies.[16]

Many critiques compare the narrator's style to other authors, typically American authors. Randy Boyagoda, writing for The Guardian, describes the initial passage of the novel as a "showy riff on Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man".[9] For Boyagoda, the anonymity and doubled life reflection of the narrator closely parallel the African American narrator of Invisible Man's commentary from the perspective of concealment.[9] Ron Charles describes the narrative voice as close to both "Roth-inspired comic scene[s] of self-abuse" and "gorgeous Whitmanian catalogue of suffering".[17]

Themes[edit]

Most reviews of the novel describe it as a literary response to the typically American-centric worldview of works like Apocalypse Now and Platoon. In particular, the section of the novel where the narrator advises on The Hamlet helps critically examine this worldview. Ron Charles describes this section as "As funny as it is tragic", able to "carry the whole novel".[17] The New York Times' book review describes the war as a "literary war", and says that Nguyen's The Sympathizer is "giving voice to the previously voiceless [Vietnamese perspective] while it compels the rest of us to look at the events of 40 years ago in a new light".[10] In part, the novel is a response to Nguyen's own admiration of, but difficult relationship with, works like Platoon, Apocalypse Now, and Rambo and the slaughter of Vietnamese in the films.[12]

The narrator's duality of race, caste, education, and loyalties drive much of the novels' activities. At first this duality is the strength of the novel's narrator, providing deft critique and investigation into the contradictions of social situations, but eventually, in the last, this duality "becomes an absurdist tour de force that might have been written by a Kafka or Genet".[10]

Reception[edit]

Critical response[edit]

The New York Times Book Review praised the novel for its place in the broader Vietnam War literature, and for its treatment of dualities in a way that "compares favorably with masters like Conrad, Greene and le Carré".[10] Writing for The Washington Post, Ron Charles called the novel "surely a new classic of war fiction" which is "startlingly insightful and perilously candid".[16] For Charles, it is less the particulars of the thematic explosion of the response to the Vietnam war that makes the novel relevant, but rather how "Nguyen plumbs the loneliness of human life, the costs of fraternity and the tragic limits of our sympathy".[16] Randy Boyagoda, writing for The Guardian, describes it as a "bold, artful and globally minded reimagining of the Vietnam war and its interwoven private and public legacies".[9] Many critics said the book offered a new perspective on the Vietnam War, one that is in contrast to the one provided by Hollywood filmmakers.[18][19][20]

The main critique from reviewers is, at times, the overwritten description in the novel.[21] Though generally supportive of the novel, Boyagoda describes this overwriting: "the Captain's grandstanding against east/west stereotypes and against the putative ills of the US and Catholicism clogs his monologue because it does little more than advance an equally hackneyed set of complaints and rebuttals. Nguyen's own academic background also seeps in, inspiring didactic language."[9]

Accolades[edit]

Organizations[a] Year[b] Category Result Ref.
American Booksellers Association 2016 Indies Choice Book Awards Honored [22]
American Library Association 2016 Andrew Carnegie Medals Won [23]
Asian Pacific American Librarians Association 2016 Adult Fiction Won [24]
Association for Asian American Studies 2017 Book Awards for Creative Writing: Prose Won [25]
California Book Awards 2016 Gold Medal in First Fiction Won [26]
Dayton Literary Peace Prize 2016 Fiction Won [27]
Deutscher Krimi Preis 2017 International Runner-up [28]
Dublin City Libraries 2017 International Dublin Literary Award Finalist[c] [29]
Edgar Awards 2016 Best First Novel Won [30]
Los Angeles Times Book Prize 2016 Mystery/Thriller Finalist [31]
PEN America 2016 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize Finalist [32]
PEN/Faulkner Foundation 2016 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction Finalist [33]
Prix du Meilleur Livre Étranger 2017 Novel Won [34]
Pulitzer Prize 2016 Fiction Won [35]
The Center for Fiction 2015 First Novel Prize Won [36]

Listicles[edit]

The Sympathizer was selected for more than 30 best-of-the-year lists, including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Guardian, and The Globe and Mail.[37][38] It was on Time magazine's list of "The 100 Best Mystery and Thriller Books of All Time", Vulture's list of "A Premature Attempt at the 21st Century Canon" and was named one of the best books of the 2010s decade by Esquire, Insider, Literary Hub, and Paste. Pasadena Public Library featured the book in its "One City, One Story" program in 2017.[39] Additionally, Los Angeles Times also selected The Sympathizer as one of the most essential L.A. literary novels.

Year-End Lists[edit]

Publisher Year Category Ref.
Amazon 2015 Best Books of the Year – Top 20 [40]
2015 Best Books of the Year: Literature & Fiction [41]
American Library Association 2016 2016 Notable Books List [42]
Berkeleyside 2016 Best Books of 2016 [43]
Bloomberg 2016 The Best Books of 2016 [44]
Booklist 2015 Editors' Choice: Adult Books, 2015 [45]
BuzzFeed 2015 The 24 Best Fiction Books Of 2015 [46]
The 24 Best Literary Debuts Of 2015 [47]
Chicago Public Library 2015 Best Books of 2015: Fiction [48]
City Club of Cleveland 2015 Best Books of 2015 [49]
East Bay Express 2015 Best Fiction of 2015 [50]
Entropy 2015 Best Fiction Books of 2015 [51]
Flavorwire 2015 The 50 Best Independent Press Books of 2015 [52]
Gates Notes 2017 5 Amazing Books I Read This Year [53]
Kirkus Reviews 2015 Best Debut Fiction of 2015 [54]
Best Fiction Books of 2015 [55]
Best Historical Fiction of 2015 [56]
Le Point 2017 25 Books of the Year [57]
Library Journal 2015 Best Books 2015: Top Ten [58]
Literary Hub 2015 The 25 Best Books of the Year [59]
Los Angeles Public Library 2015 Best of 2015: Fiction [60]
Minnesota Public Radio 2015 Top Fiction Picks of 2015 [61]
National Post 2015 The NP99: The Best Books of 2015 [62]
Orlando Weekly 2015 Top 10 Books of 2015 [63]
Politics and Prose 2015 2015 Holiday Newsletter – Fiction Favorites [64]
PopMatters 2015 A Short List of Great 2015 Books [65]
Powell's Books 2016 Staff Top Fives 2016 [66]
Publishers Weekly 2015 Best Books of 2015 – Fiction [67]
Quartz 2015 Best Books of 2015 [68]
Slate 2015 Laura Miller’s 10 Favorite Books of 2015 [69]
Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center 2015 Top 25 APA Book Picks for 2015 [70]
The Daily Beast 2015 The Best Fiction of 2015 [71]
The Georgia Straight 2015 This Year's Outstanding Books [72]
The Globe and Mail 2015 Globe 100: Best Books of 2015 [73]
The Guardian 2015 Best Books of 2015 [74]
2016 The Best Fiction of 2016 [75]
The Irish Times 2016 The Best Crime Fiction of 2016 [76]
The Kansas City Star 2015 Best Fiction of 2015 [77]
The New York Times 2015 100 Notable Books of 2015 [78]
The Seattle Times 2015 Best Books of 2015 [79]
The Wall Street Journal 2015 Best Books of 2015 [80]
The Washington Post 2015 Notable Fiction Books of 2015 [81]

Decade/Century Book Lists[edit]

Publisher Year Category Ref.
Esquire 2019 The Best Books of the 2010s [82]
Insider 2019 101 Books From the 2010s That You Need to Read [83]
Literary Hub 2019 Best of the Decade [84]
The 20 Best Novels of the Decade [85]
The 10 Best Debut Novels of the Decade [86]
100 Books That Defined the Decade [87]
Parade 2022 222 Best Books of All Time [88]
Paste 2019 The 40 Best Novels of the 2010s [89]
Penguin Books 2020 The Greatest Spy Thrillers in Literature [90]
Powell's Books 2018 25 Books to Read Before You Die: 21st Century [91]
Rising Kashmir 2022 Ten Best Spy Novels of All Time [92]
Southern Living 2023 50 Books From The Past 50 Years [93]
Time 2023 The 100 Best Mystery and Thriller Books of All Time [94]
Vulture 2018 A Premature Attempt at the 21st Century Canon [95]

Miscellaneous[edit]

Publisher Year Category Ref.
Los Angeles Times 2023 The Ultimate L.A. Bookshelf: Fiction [96]
Pasadena Public Library 2017 One City, One Story [97]

Adaptation[edit]

In April 2021, A24 and Rhombus Media acquired the rights to the novel to adapt it into a television series.[98] In July 2021, it was announced that HBO had given the production a series order. The series will be produced by A24 with Robert Downey Jr. as co-star and executive producer, Park Chan-wook as director and Don McKellar as co-showrunner.[99][100] In November 2022, Hoa Xuande, Fred Nguyen Khan, Toan Le, Vy Le, Alan Trong, Sandra Oh, Kiều Chinh, Nguyễn Cao Kỳ Duyên joined the cast.[101][102] In January 2023, it was announced that Marc Munden and Fernando Meirelles would direct several episodes of the series and also Duy Nguyen, Kayli Tran and VyVy Nguyen added to the cast.[103] The series premiered on HBO's streaming service MAX on April 14th, 2024.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Awards, festivals, honors and other miscellaneous organizations are listed in alphabetical order.
  2. ^ Indicates the year of ceremony.
  3. ^ This is also the final list before announcing the winners.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Sympathizer (Audiobook) by Viet Thanh Nguyen". Audible. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  2. ^ Viet Thanh Nguyen (2 April 2015). The Sympathizer: A Novel (Pulitzer Prize for Fiction). Grove Atlantic. p. 10. ISBN 978-0-8021-9169-4. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  3. ^ a b "The Sympathizer". Grove Atlantic. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  4. ^ Thanh Nguyen, Viet (7 April 2015). "The Sympathizer". Kirkus Reviews. Archived from the original on 30 December 2023. Retrieved 30 December 2023.
  5. ^ "The Sympathizer - Viet Thanh Nguyen". Tulane University Libraries. Archived from the original on 30 December 2023. Retrieved 30 December 2023.
  6. ^ "The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen". Los Angeles Times. May 2015. Archived from the original on 1 November 2018. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  7. ^ "Book Marks reviews of The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen". Book Marks. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  8. ^ "Editors' Choice". The New York Times. 10 April 2015. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  9. ^ a b c d e Boyagoda, Randy (12 March 2016). "The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen review – a bold, artful debut". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  10. ^ a b c d e Caputo, Philip (2 April 2015). "'The Sympathizer,' by Viet Thanh Nguyen". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  11. ^ "Author Viet Thanh Nguyen Discusses 'The Sympathizer' And His Escape From Vietnam". NPR. 17 May 2016. Archived from the original on 30 December 2023. Retrieved 30 December 2023.
  12. ^ a b NPR Staff (11 April 2015). "A Dark, Funny — And Vietnamese — Look At The Vietnam War". NPR. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  13. ^ Khatib, Joumana (24 February 2021). "16 New Books to Watch For in March". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  14. ^ Fassler, Joe (7 July 2015). "For Readers, Writing Is a Process of 'Emotional Osmosis'". The Atlantic. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  15. ^ "The Sympathizer, by Viet Thanh Nguyen (Grove Press)". Pulitzer Prize. Archived from the original on 28 December 2023. Retrieved 28 December 2023.
  16. ^ a b c d Charles, Ron (31 March 2015). "'The Sympathizer': A cerebral thriller about Vietnam and its aftermath". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  17. ^ a b Charles, Ron (17 April 2015). "Review: 'The Sympathizer' offers an outsider's piercing view of the U.S." The Kansas City Star. Archived from the original on 30 December 2023. Retrieved 30 December 2023.
  18. ^ Purohit, Sudarshan (25 July 2016). "The Sympathizer: Different perspectives of the Vietnam war". The New Indian Express. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  19. ^ Mumford, Tracy (7 May 2015). "'The Sympathizer:' A very different look at the Vietnam War". Minnesota Public Radio. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  20. ^ Gautier, Amina (7 July 2015). "The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen". The Rumpus. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  21. ^ Caputo, Philip (2 April 2015). "'The Sympathizer,' by Viet Thanh Nguyen". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023. (A parenthetical quibble. Good as it is, "The Sympathizer" is sometimes marred by overwriting. Lines like this — "The waiters arrived at that moment with the solemnity of Egyptian servants ready to be buried alive with their pharaoh, platters with the main courses propped on their shoulders" — appear a bit too often.)
  22. ^ Hawkins, Rosemary (13 April 2016). "2016 Indies Choice and E.B. White Read-Aloud Award Winners Announced". American Booksellers Association. Archived from the original on 13 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  23. ^ For, Celeste (11 January 2016). "2016 Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction". Carnegie Corporation of New York. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  24. ^ Kai-Hwa Wang, Frances (27 January 2017). "Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association Names 2016 Literature Award Winners". NBC News. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  25. ^ "Book Awards". Association for Asian American Studies. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  26. ^ Gilmore, Sue (10 June 2016). "California Book Awards go to Lucia Berlin, Viet Thanh Nguyen and Jill Leovy". East Bay Times. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  27. ^ Local News (11 October 2016). "Dayton Literary Peace Prize winners announced". Dayton Daily News. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  28. ^ "Deutscher Krimipreis für Oliver Bottini". Buchreport (in German). 16 January 2018. Archived from the original on 12 December 2023. Retrieved 12 December 2023.
  29. ^ The Canadian Press (11 April 2017). "Dublin literary award short list announced". Metroland Media Group. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
    "International Dublin Literary Award, Tips From Literary Journal Editors, and More". Poets & Writers. 21 June 2017. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  30. ^ Sternbergh, Adam (3 May 2016). "The Sympathizer Won a Pulitzer and an Edgar, and May Herald the Great Literary Convergence". Vulture. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  31. ^ Kellogg, Carolyn (23 February 2016). "L.A. Times Book Prizes will honor Juan Felipe Herrera, James Patterson; finalists announced". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
    "Los Angeles Times Book Prizes Winners Announced". Business Wire. 10 April 2016. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  32. ^ Literary Hub (11 April 2016). "Getting to Know the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Finalists". Literary Hub. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
    Maher, John (12 April 2016). "Morrison, Coates, Redniss Win 2016 PEN Awards". Publishers Weekly. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  33. ^ Charles, Ron (8 March 2016). "The 2016 finalists for the PEN/Faulkner Award". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
    Flood, Alison (6 April 2016). "James Hannaham wins $15,000 PEN/Faulkner award for fiction". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  34. ^ Belfond (7 November 2017). "Le Sympathisant, prix du Meilleur Livre étranger". Place des éditeurs (in French). Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  35. ^ Segal, Corinne (18 April 2016). "'Hamilton' becomes 9th musical to win Pulitzer Prize". PBS. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  36. ^ "Viet Thanh Nguyen Wins Center for Fiction's First Novel Prize". Publishers Weekly. 9 December 2015. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  37. ^ Herrera Bandrich, Ricardo (9 April 2016). "The Vietnam War, The American War". Los Angeles Review of Books. Archived from the original on 28 December 2023. Retrieved 28 December 2023.
  38. ^ CBC Radio (2 October 2016). "Viet Thanh Nguyen on redefining what it means to be a refugee". CBC.ca. Archived from the original on 28 December 2023. Retrieved 28 December 2023.
  39. ^ Staff Reports (15 February 2017). "Pasadena Library Director Michelle Perera to Give Library Commission Preview of One City, One Story 2017 Program". Pasadena Now. Archived from the original on 28 December 2023. Retrieved 28 December 2023.
  40. ^ "Best Books of 2015". Amazon. Archived from the original on 13 March 2017. Retrieved 28 December 2023.
  41. ^ "Literature & Fiction: Books". Amazon. Archived from the original on 28 December 2023. Retrieved 28 December 2023.
  42. ^ ALA News (11 January 2016). "2016 Notable Books List: Year's best in fiction, nonfiction and poetry named by RUSA readers' advisory experts". American Library Association. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  43. ^ Berkeleyside staff (16 December 2016). "Best Books of 2016, picked by Berkeleyside editors, guests". Berkeleyside. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  44. ^ Verhage, Julie; Kennedy, Simon (8 December 2016). "The Best Books of 2016". Bloomberg. Archived from the original on 2 January 2024. Retrieved 2 January 2024.
  45. ^ "Booklist Editors' Choice: Adult Books, 2015, by | Booklist Online". Booklist. 1 January 2016. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  46. ^ Fitzgerald, Isaac (30 November 2015). "The 24 Best Fiction Books Of 2015". BuzzFeed. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  47. ^ Lee, Jarry (24 December 2015). "The 24 Best Literary Debuts Of 2015". BuzzFeed. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  48. ^ ChiPubLib_Adults. "Best Books of 2015: Fiction". Chicago Public LibraryBiblioCommons. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  49. ^ "Best Books of 2015". City Club of Cleveland. 13 January 2016. Archived from the original on 2 January 2024. Retrieved 2 January 2024.
  50. ^ Baldassari, Erin (25 November 2015). "Best Fiction of 2015". East Bay Express. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  51. ^ Entropy (8 December 2015). "Best of 2015: Best Fiction Books". Entropy. Archived from the original on 22 October 2021. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  52. ^ Sturgeon, Jonathon (23 November 2015). "The 50 Best Independent Press Books of 2015". Flavorwire. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  53. ^ Elkins, Kathleen (4 December 2017). "Bill Gates says these were the 5 best books he read in 2017". CNBC. Archived from the original on 28 December 2023. Retrieved 28 December 2023.
    Bill Gates (4 December 2017). "5 amazing books I read this year". Gates Notes. Archived from the original on 28 December 2023. Retrieved 28 December 2023.
  54. ^ "Best Debut Fiction of 2015". Kirkus Reviews. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  55. ^ "Best Fiction Books of 2015". Kirkus Reviews. Archived from the original on 8 November 2016. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  56. ^ "Best Historical Fiction of 2015". Kirkus Reviews. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  57. ^ Le Point (30 November 2017). "Notre palmarès des 25 livres de l'année". Le Point (in French). Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  58. ^ LJ Reviews (12 November 2015). "Best Books 2015: Top Ten". Library Journal. Archived from the original on 22 October 2017. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  59. ^ Literary Hub (15 December 2015). "The 25 Best Books of the Year, According to Booksellers". Literary Hub. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  60. ^ "Best of 2015: Fiction". Los Angeles Public Library. 8 January 2016. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  61. ^ Mumford, Tracy (2 December 2015). "Best books to give (and get): Top fiction picks of 2015". Minnesota Public Radio. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  62. ^ National Post Staff (4 December 2015). "The complete NP99: the best books of 2015, ranked". National Post. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  63. ^ Rivas, Ryan (16 December 2015). "Our top 10 books of 2015". Orlando Weekly. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  64. ^ "Politics and Prose Bookstore | Independent bookstore and coffeehouse in Washington, D.C since 1984". Politics and Prose. 19 November 2015. Archived from the original on 19 September 2021. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
    Politics & Prose Bookstore (30 November 2015). "Politics and Prose 2015 Holiday Newsletter". Issuu. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  65. ^ Barsanti, Chris (22 January 2016). "A Short List of Great 2015 Books". PopMatters. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  66. ^ "Staff Top Fives 2016". Powell's Books. Archived from the original on 28 December 2023. Retrieved 28 December 2023.
  67. ^ "Best Books of 2015 - Fiction". Publishers Weekly. Archived from the original on 13 December 2023. Retrieved 13 December 2023.
  68. ^ Kar, Ian (7 December 2015). "What critics agree are the best books of 2015". Quartz. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  69. ^ Miller, Laura (3 December 2015). "Laura Miller's 10 Favorite Books of 2015". Slate. Archived from the original on 28 December 2023. Retrieved 28 December 2023.
  70. ^ "BookDragon's Top 25 APA Book Picks for 2015". APAC. Archived from the original on 1 October 2020. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  71. ^ O’Connor, William; Jones, Malcolm (12 December 2015). "The Best Fiction of 2015". The Daily Beast. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  72. ^ Chau, David; Croll, Jennifer; Fetherling, George; Lupick, Travis; Lynch, Brian; Smith, Charlie (9 December 2015). "Our critics round up this year's outstanding books". The Georgia Straight. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  73. ^ "The Globe 100: The Best Books of 2015". The Globe and Mail. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  74. ^ "Best books of 2015 – part one". The Guardian. 28 November 2015. Archived from the original on 10 June 2021. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  75. ^ Jordan, Justine (30 November 2016). "The best fiction of 2016". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  76. ^ Burke, Declan; Hughes, Declan (22 December 2016). "The best crime fiction of 2016". The Irish Times. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  77. ^ The Star (11 December 2015). "Best fiction of 2015". The Kansas City Star. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  78. ^ "100 Notable Books of 2015". The New York Times. 27 November 2015. Archived from the original on 29 November 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  79. ^ Ann Gwinn, Mary (4 December 2015). "Seattle Times' critics best books of 2015". The Seattle Times. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  80. ^ "WSJ's Best Books of 2015". The Wall Street Journal. 9 December 2015. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  81. ^ "Notable fiction books of 2015". The Washington Post. 18 November 2015. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  82. ^ TheEsquireEditors (27 November 2019). "The Best Books of the 2010s Nudged the World in a New, Better Direction". Esquire. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  83. ^ Grindell, Samantha (11 December 2019). "101 books from the 2010s that you need to read". Insider Inc. Archived from the original on 17 December 2023. Retrieved 17 December 2023.
  84. ^ Temple, Emily (24 September 2019). "Best of the Decade: What Books Will We Still Be Reading in 10 Years?". Literary Hub. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  85. ^ Temple, Emily (23 December 2019). "The 20 Best Novels of the Decade". Literary Hub. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  86. ^ Temple, Emily (23 December 2019). "The 10 Best Debut Novels of the Decade". Literary Hub. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  87. ^ Temple, Emily (28 December 2019). "100 Books That Defined the Decade". Literary Hub. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  88. ^ Giltz, Michael (15 December 2022). "222 Best Books of All Time That Deserve a Spot on Your Bookshelf, With Picks from Bestselling Authors and Indie Booksellers". Parade. Archived from the original on 2 January 2024. Retrieved 2 January 2024.
  89. ^ Frannie Jackson/Paste Staff (14 October 2019). "The 40 Best Novels of the 2010s". Paste. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  90. ^ Blake, Matt (6 November 2020). "The greatest spy thrillers in literature". Penguin Books. Archived from the original on 2 January 2024. Retrieved 2 January 2024.
  91. ^ Powell's Staff (13 August 2018). "25 Books to Read Before You Die: 21st Century". Powell's Books. Archived from the original on 13 December 2023. Retrieved 13 December 2023.
  92. ^ "Ten best spy novels of all time". Rising Kashmir. 6 February 2022. Archived from the original on 2 January 2024. Retrieved 2 January 2024.
  93. ^ Rogers, Caroline (2 June 2023). "50 Books From The Past 50 Years Everyone Should Read At Least Once". Southern Living. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  94. ^ "The Sympathizer: The 100 Best Mystery and Thriller Books". Time. 3 October 2023. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  95. ^ VultureEditors (17 September 2018). "A Premature Attempt at the 21st Century Canon A panel of critics tells us what belongs on a list of the 100 most important books of the 2000s … so far". Vulture. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  96. ^ Kachka, Boris; Kellogg, Carolyn; Kipen, David; L. Ulin, David (11 April 2023). "The 16 best literary fiction books about L.A." Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 1 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  97. ^ "One City, One Story - March 2nd". Pasadena, California. 16 February 2017. Archived from the original on 14 December 2023. Retrieved 14 December 2023.
  98. ^ Del Rosario, Alexandra (6 April 2021). "Viet Thanh Nguyen's Pulitzer-Winning 'The Sympathizer' To Be Developed As TV Series By A24 & Rhombus Media". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  99. ^ Marie Zorrilla, Mónica (15 July 2021). "Robert Downey Jr. to Co-Star in Adaptation of 'The Sympathizer' for HBO and A24". Variety. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  100. ^ Porter, Rick (9 November 2022). "HBO's Post-Vietnam War Series 'The Sympathizer' Sets Main Cast". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  101. ^ Petski, Denise (9 November 2022). "'The Sympathizer': Five Join Robert Downey Jr. In HBO & A24's Drama Series Adaptation". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  102. ^ Hailu, Selome (10 November 2022). "'The Sympathizer' at HBO Casts Sandra Oh, Kieu Chinh and Nguyen Cao Ky Duyen". Variety. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.
  103. ^ Petski, Denise (20 January 2023). "'The Sympathizer': Marc Munden & Fernando Meirelles To Direct HBO/A24 Series, Three Cast". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on 27 December 2023. Retrieved 27 December 2023.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]