The Talk of the Town (1918 film)

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The Talk of the Town
Dorothy Phillips The Talk of The Town 1918.png
Dorothy Phillips in film ad
Directed by Allen Holubar
Written by Allen Holubar (scenario)
Harold Vickers (story)
Starring Dorothy Phillips
Lon Chaney
Cinematography Fred LeRoy Granville
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date
  • September 28, 1918 (1918-09-28)
Running time
6 reels
Country United States
Language Silent (English intertitles)

The Talk of the Town is a 1918 American silent comedy film directed by Allen Holubar and featuring Lon Chaney.[1]

Plot[edit]

As described in a film magazine,[2] Genevra French (Phillips) has been raised without knowledge of worldly affairs. She convinces a family friend, Lawrence Tabor (Stowell), to marry her and then tells her husband that she has married him only so that she may see the spicy side of life, which she proceeds to do. Her husband gives her a free rein, and by this method convinces her that what she is doing is wrong. She becomes the kind of wife she should be, bringing happiness to both herself and her husband.

Cast[edit]

Reception[edit]

Like many American films of the time, The Talk of the Town was subject to cuts by city and state film censorship boards. For example, the Chicago Board of Censors required a cut, in Reel 2, of four intertitles "Perhaps we should tell Genevra everything", "Genevra will learn of life when she marries", "And instead of a beautiful thing, nature becomes a hideous, alluring mystery", and "I never pretended to be a saint — you knew what it meant to play with me", first two kissing scenes before young woman locks herself in room, and first two scenes of woman struggling in man's arms in second room.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Progressive Silent Film List: The Talk of the Town". silentera.com. Retrieved June 26, 2008. 
  2. ^ "Reviews: The Talk of the Town". Exhibitors Herald. New York City: Exhibitors Herald Company. 7 (14): 25. September 28, 1918. 
  3. ^ "Official Cut-Outs by the Chicago Board of Censors". Exhibitors Herald. 7 (17): 43. October 19, 1918. 

External links[edit]