The Texas Observer

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
The Texas Observer
Texasobserverlogo.png
CategoriesPolitics
FrequencyBimonthly
FounderFrankie Randolph and Ronnie Dugger
Year founded1954
CompanyTexas Democracy Foundation
CountryUnited States
Based inAustin, Texas
LanguageEnglish
Websitewww.texasobserver.org
ISSN0040-4519

The Texas Observer (also known as the Observer) is an American magazine with a liberal political outlook.[1] The Observer is published bimonthly by a 501(c)(3)[2] nonprofit organization, the Texas Democracy Foundation. Its mission, as declared by founding editor Ronnie Dugger, is to "serve no group or party but ... hew hard to the truth as we find it and the right as we see it".[3] It is headquartered in Austin, Texas.[4]

History[edit]

The Observer was founded by Frankie Randolph and Dugger in Austin in 1954 to address topics often ignored by daily newspapers in the state, such as those affecting working people and concerning class and racism.[5][6]

In the 1970s, Molly Ivins served as the Observer's co-editor and a political reporter.[7]

Notable staff and contributors[edit]

Notable Observer staff and contributors, past and present:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Patoski, Joe Nick (1 July 2001). "Liberalism Lives!". Texas Monthly. Retrieved 14 July 2021.
  2. ^ "The Texas Democracy Foundation". Exempt Organization Search. Internal Revenue Service. Retrieved August 28, 2016.
  3. ^ "About the Texas Observer". The Texas Observer. Retrieved 2017-10-03.
  4. ^ "Contact" Archived November 8, 2016, at the Wayback Machine. The Texas Observer. Retrieved on May 6, 2010.
  5. ^ "About Us". The Texas Observer. Archived from the original on 2006-04-15. Retrieved 2006-04-20.
  6. ^ Moyers, Bill (2005-11-21). "The Texas Observer at 50". Huffington Post. Retrieved 2017-10-03.
  7. ^ Minutaglio, Bill; Smith, W. Michael (2009). Molly Ivins : a rebel life. Internet Archive. New York : PublicAffairs. ISBN 978-1-58648-717-1.
  8. ^ "Jake Bernstein". The Texas Observer. Retrieved 2022-07-20.
  9. ^ "Molly Ivins". The Texas Observer. Retrieved 2022-07-20.
  10. ^ "Aug 12, 1960 Issue | Texas Observer Print Archives". issues.texasobserver.org. Retrieved 2022-07-20.

External links[edit]