The Trial of the Chicago 7

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The Trial of the Chicago 7
TrialChicago7poster.jpeg
Official promotional poster
Directed byAaron Sorkin
Produced by
  • Stuart M. Besser
  • Matt Jackson
  • Marc Platt
  • Tyler Thompson
Written byAaron Sorkin
Starring
Music byDaniel Pemberton
CinematographyPhedon Papamichael
Edited byAlan Baumgarten
Production
company
Distributed byNetflix
Release date
  • October 16, 2020 (2020-10-16)
Running time
129 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

The Trial of the Chicago 7 is an upcoming American legal drama film written and directed by Aaron Sorkin. The film follows the Chicago Seven, a group of anti-Vietnam War protesters charged with conspiracy in late 1969 relating to charges of crossing state lines with the intention of inciting riots at the 1968 Democratic convention in Chicago. It features an ensemble cast that includes Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Sacha Baron Cohen, Daniel Flaherty, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Michael Keaton, Frank Langella, John Carroll Lynch, Eddie Redmayne, Noah Robbins, Mark Rylance, Alex Sharp, and Jeremy Strong.

Sorkin originally wrote the screenplay in 2007, with the intent of Steven Spielberg directing the film with mostly unknown actors. After the 2007 Writers Guild of America strike and budget concerns forced Spielberg to drop out as director, Sorkin was announced as director in October 2018, and much of the cast joined that same month.[1] Filming took place in the fall of 2019 in Chicago and around New Jersey.

Originally planned to be released in theaters by Paramount Pictures, the rights to the film were sold to Netflix due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Netflix will release it in select theatres in September 25, 2020, and digitally on October 16, 2020.

Premise[edit]

Based on the story of the Chicago Seven, a group of seven defendants charged by the federal government with conspiracy in 1969 and 1970, inciting to riot, and other charges related to anti-Vietnam War and countercultural protests that took place in Chicago, Illinois, on the occasion of the 1968 Democratic National Convention.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

In 2007, writer Aaron Sorkin wrote a script entitled The Trial of the Chicago 7, based on the conspiracy trial of the so-called Chicago 7.[2] In July 2020, Sorkin stated to Vanity Fair that he first found out about the planned film during a visit to Steven Spielberg's house, claiming that Spielberg "told me he wanted to make a movie about the riots at the 1968 Democratic Convention and the trial that followed." He also denied that knowing what role Spielberg wanted him in, stating, "I left not knowing what the hell he was talking about."[1]

Producers Spielberg, Walter F. Parkes, and Laurie MacDonald collaborated on the development of Sorkin's script, with Spielberg intending to direct the film. Sacha Baron Cohen was originally cast as Abbie Hoffman,[3] while Spielberg approached Will Smith for the role of Bobby Seale, and planned to meet with Heath Ledger about playing Tom Hayden.[4] The Writers Guild of America strike, which started in November 2007 and lasted 100 days,[5] delayed filming and the project was suspended.[6] Sorkin was later to continue to rewrite the script for Spielberg, and the director intended to mostly cast unknowns to keep the budget down.[7] Paul Greengrass[8] and Ben Stiller[9] were rumored as replacement directors, but the project did not move forward.

In July 2020, Vanity Fair reported that Spielberg had decided to resurrect The Trial of the Chicago Seven "a year and a half ago."[1] In October 2018, Sorkin was announced as director.[10] In December 2018, the film was put on hold due to budgetary concerns,[11] until it was revived and ready for distribution offers.[12] Paramount Pictures ended up picking up distribution rights.[13]

Casting[edit]

In October 2018, Baron Cohen and Eddie Redmayne joined the cast.[10][14] In November 2018, Jonathan Majors joined the cast.[15] In February 2019, Seth Rogen, Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Alex Sharp joined the cast. Michael Keaton was also being considered for a role.[16] In August, Frank Langella and Mark Rylance were added to the cast.[13] In September, Jeremy Strong was cast, replacing Rogen.[17] In October, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II joined the cast to replace Majors, with Kelvin Harrison Jr., Keaton, William Hurt, J. C. MacKenzie, Max Adler and Ben Shenkman joining the cast.[18][19][20][21][22][23]

Filming[edit]

Principal production was set to begin in September 2019, but began the next month in October between Chicago and New Jersey.[24][25][26] Filming in Morris County, New Jersey took place in Hennessy Hall, affectionately known as "The Mansion," on Fairleigh Dickinson University's Florham Campus and Hyland Hall (located within Henderson Hall), Grant Park in Chicago, and at Santa Maria at College of Saint Elizabeth.[27]

Release[edit]

The film was originally scheduled by Paramount Pictures to begin a limited theatrical release on September 25, 2020, before going wide on October 16, 2020.[28][20] On June 20, 2020, due to the movie theater closures because of the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions, it was reported Netflix was in negotiations to acquire rights to the film.[29] On July 1, 2020, they officially closed a $56 million deal to distribute the film, with intentions to release it prior to Election Day in November.[30] It is scheduled to be released in select theaters in September, and digitally on Netflix on October 16.[31]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Ansen, David (July 22, 2020). "First Look at Aaron Sorkin's The Trial of the Chicago 7". Vanity Fair. Retrieved July 22, 2020.
  2. ^ Michael Fleming, Pamela McClintock (July 12, 2007). "Sorkin on 'Trial' at DreamWorks". Variety. Retrieved September 23, 2007.
  3. ^ John Harlow (December 30, 2007). "No more jokes as Borat turns war protester". The Sunday Times. London. Retrieved December 31, 2007.
  4. ^ "Will Smith Confirms Involvement in Spielberg's CHICAGO 7". Collider. January 15, 2008. Archived from the original on January 20, 2008. Retrieved January 22, 2008.
  5. ^ Paul Greengrass in Talks for Aaron Sorkin-Penned 'The Trial of the Chicago 7' , Rebecca Ford, The Hollywood Reporter, 23 July 2013.Retrieved: April 26, 2015.
  6. ^ Nicole Sperling (February 22, 2008). "Spielberg's 'Chicago 7' delayed". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on February 26, 2008. Retrieved February 23, 2008.
  7. ^ Nikki Finke (February 22, 2008). "Spielberg Delays Start Of 'Chicago 7' Due To "Uncertainty Over A SAG Strike"". LA Weekly. Retrieved February 23, 2008.
  8. ^ Neil Miller (August 10, 2008). "Paul Greengrass to Direct The Trial of the Chicago 7?". Film School Rejects. Retrieved August 10, 2008.
  9. ^ "Ben Stiller Might Direct Sorkin's The Trial of the Chicago 7?!". FirstShowing.net. October 22, 2008. Retrieved February 18, 2014.
  10. ^ a b Kroll, Justin (October 26, 2018). "Aaron Sorkin to Direct 'Trial of the Chicago 7' With Sacha Baron Cohen in Talks to Star". Variety. Retrieved August 13, 2019.
  11. ^ D'Alessandro, Anthony (December 12, 2018). "Aaron Sorkin's 'Trial of the Chicago 7' Put On Pause". Deadline. Retrieved August 13, 2019.
  12. ^ "Aaron Sorkin's 'The Trial of the Chicago 7' Moving Forward After Shutdown". The Hollywood Reporter. February 1, 2019. Retrieved August 13, 2019.
  13. ^ a b Fleming, Mike, Jr. (August 29, 2019). "Paramount & Cross Creek Board Aaron Sorkin's 'Chicago 7;' Frank Langella, Mark Rylance Join Sacha Baron Cohen, Eddie Redmayne, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Jonathan Majors".
  14. ^ Justin Kroll (October 30, 2018). "Eddie Redmayne in Talks to Star in Aaron Sorkin's 'Trial of the Chicago 7' (EXCLUSIVE)". Variety. Retrieved August 13, 2019.
  15. ^ Anthony D'Alessandro (November 26, 2018). "Jonathan Majors In Talks To Play Black Panther Party Co-Founder Bobby Seale In Aaron Sorkin's 'Trial of the Chicago 7'". Deadline. Retrieved August 13, 2019.
  16. ^ "Hot Berlin Pic: Aaron Sorkin's 'Trial of the Chicago 7' Adds Seth Rogen, Jonathan Majors, Joseph Gordon-Levitt & Heads To Market Before Summer Shoot". Deadline. February 1, 2019. Retrieved August 13, 2019.
  17. ^ Kroll, Justin (September 4, 2019). "'Succession' Star Jeremy Strong Joins Aaron Sorkin's 'Trial of the Chicago 7' (EXCLUSIVE)".
  18. ^ Kroll, Justin (October 1, 2019). "Aaron Sorkin's 'The Trial of the Chicago 7' Adds 'Aquaman's' Yahya Abdul-Mateen II (EXCLUSIVE)".
  19. ^ N'Duka, Amanda (October 14, 2019). "'The Trial Of The Chicago 7': Kelvin Harrison Jr Joins Aaron Sorkin-Helmed Feature".
  20. ^ a b N'Duka, Amanda (October 25, 2019). "Aaron Sorkin's 'The Trial Of The Chicago 7' Gets October 2020 Release Date; Michael Keaton & More Board".
  21. ^ "Aaron Sorkin's 'The Trial of the Chicago 7' Adds Michael Keaton, Sets September 2020 Release". The Hollywood Reporter.
  22. ^ Sneider, Jeff (October 28, 2019). "Exclusive: Thomas Middleditch, Max Adler Join Aaron Sorkin's 'Trial of the Chicago 7'". Collider. Retrieved October 28, 2019.
  23. ^ Sneider, Jeff (October 28, 2019). "Exclusive: Thomas Middleditch, Max Adler Join Aaron Sorkin's 'Trial of the Chicago 7'". Collider. Retrieved October 28, 2019.
  24. ^ Christine (September 27, 2019). "Friday, Sept. 27 Filming Locations for This is Us, Lucifer, SVU, & more!". OnLocationVacations.com. Retrieved September 30, 2019.
  25. ^ Chitwood, Adam (August 30, 2019). "Aaron Sorkin's 'Trial of the Chicago 7' Gets New Life as Paramount Backs the Star-Studded Drama".
  26. ^ Metz, Nina. "Phoebe Waller-Bridge HBO series 'Run,' Aaron Sorkin film 'The Trial of the Chicago 7' shooting here". chicagotribune.com.
  27. ^ Kuperinsky, Amy (November 20, 2019). "Aaron Sorkin movie 'The Trial of the Chicago 7' filming at 2 N.J. colleges". nj.com.
  28. ^ Trilby Beresford (May 1, 2020). "Latest 'Transformers' Lands 2022 Release Date". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved June 20, 2020.
  29. ^ Wiseman, Andreas (June 20, 2020). "Netflix Circling Big Deal For Aaron Sorkin's 'The Trial Of Chicago 7'". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved June 20, 2020.
  30. ^ Wiseman, Andreas (July 1, 2020). "Netflix Closes $50M+ Global Deal For Aaron Sorkin's 'The Trial Of The Chicago 7'". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  31. ^ Ansen, David (July 22, 2020). "First Look at Aaron Sorkin's The Trial of the Chicago 7". Vanity Fair. Retrieved July 22, 2020.

External links[edit]