Troubadour (London nightclub)

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Troubadour
Troubadour, London, 18 Apr 2009.jpg
Exterior of the Troubadour in 2009
Location265 Old Brompton Road, Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea
London, SW59JA
United Kingdom
Coordinates51°29′20″N 0°11′30″W / 51.4888°N 0.1917°W / 51.4888; -0.1917Coordinates: 51°29′20″N 0°11′30″W / 51.4888°N 0.1917°W / 51.4888; -0.1917
Public transitLondon Underground Earl's Court
OwnerGiles McNamee
TypeNightclub, Coffee house and Music Venue
Genre(s)
  • Folk
  • rock
  • jazz
  • reggae
  • world
  • singer-songwriters
  • pop
  • experimental
Seating typesitting and standing
Capacity120
Construction
Broke ground1954 but rumor has it as a music club and meeting place even earlier
Opened1954; 69 years ago (1954)
Website
www.troubadourlondon.com

The Troubadour is a nightclub, restaurant and pub located at 265 Old Brompton Road, Earls Court, London. Established in 1954, it is one of the oldest and last remaining nightclubs and coffee houses of its era in London. It still offers live music seven days a week.

Financial troubles[edit]

The Troubadour was in danger of closure due to financial difficulties after being served with a noise abatement notice in 2012, related to use of the garden. In 2015, ownership was taken over by shareholder Giles McNamee, who has indicated there will be future investments to keep the club open.[1][2]

Ownership[edit]

The Troubadour has had four proprietors since its opening:[3]

  • 1954–72, Michael Van Bloemen[4] and Sheila Van Bloemen, founders of the venue
  • 1972–98, Bruce Rogerson
  • 1998–2015, Simon Thornhill and Susie Thornhill.[2]
  • 2015–present, Giles McNamee[2]

Artists[edit]

The club has played host to a number of major artists in various stages of their careers. Among these have been:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pollock, Stephen (9 September 2015). "The slow death of music venues in cities". The Guardian.
  2. ^ a b c "The Troubadour has been saved!". Evening Standard. Retrieved 24 January 2018.
  3. ^ Tim Cumming, "Would you like Dylan with your coffee?", The Daily Telegraph, 6 May 2004.
  4. ^ Graham Hassell, "Obituary: Michael van Bloemen", The Guardian, 18 February 2009.
  5. ^ Michael Feeney Callan, Richard Harris – Sex, Death and the Movies (ISBN 1 86105 766 0), pp. 62–64.
  6. ^ The Times, Saturday, 7 April 1956.
  7. ^ Stephen Davis, Old Gods Almost Dead (ISBN 1 85410 866 2).
  8. ^ "Still On The Road 1963". Bjorner.com. Retrieved 17 October 2019.
  9. ^ "Paul Simon 1963 / 1964". 2 March 2010.
  10. ^ "Joni Mitchell - Joni Mitchell at the Troubadour, London in 1970". Ilovejonimitchall.tumblr.com. Retrieved 14 November 2017.
  11. ^ "Led Zeppelin | Official Website London". Ledzeppelin.com. Retrieved 17 October 2019.
  12. ^ "The Daryl Runswick Quartet 1973". Darylrunswick.net. Retrieved 17 October 2019.
  13. ^ "From 'Happy' Williams to Cedar Walton". 17 December 2018. Retrieved 3 February 2022.
  14. ^ Ward, Philip (26 February 2008). "Sandy Denny: Troubadour anniversary tribute". Sandydennyblogspot.com.
  15. ^ "Independent review". Independent.co.uk. Archived from the original on 22 June 2008.
  16. ^ Tim Cumming, "Sandy Denny Tribute, The Troubadour, London", The Independent, 22 April 2008.
  17. ^ "Richard Farina at the Troubadour". Richardandmimi.com. Archived from the original on 18 June 2021. Retrieved 17 October 2019.
  18. ^ "Other Folksingers at The Troubadour | More photos by Alison Chapman McLean". richardandmimi.com. Retrieved 3 February 2022.

External links[edit]