The Troubles in Forkhill

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The Troubles in Forkhill recounts incidents during, and the effects of, the Troubles in Forkhill (or Forkill), County Armagh, Northern Ireland.

Incidents in Forkhill during the Troubles:

1974[edit]

1975[edit]

  • 17 July 1975 - Peter Willis (37), Edward Garside (34), Robert McCarter (33) and Calvert Brown (25), all members of the British Army, were killed near Forkhill by a Provisional Irish Republican Army remote-controlled bomb, hidden in a milk churn and detonated when their search patrol passed.[2] On 10 July, British soldiers had seen an apparent suspect explosive device near Forkhill and kept it under observation until 17 July, when a patrol went to deal with it. On approach, an explosive was detonated from a distance. RIC (photographic aerial reconnaissance) had been flown that morning but ground mist obscured the remote wire. As well as the four soldiers killed, another was seriously wounded. A man was arrested and appeared in court charged with murder.[3]

1977[edit]

  • 14 May 1977 - Robert Nairac (29), undercover British Army officer, was abducted by the Provisional Irish Republican Army outside the Three Step Inn, Dromintee, near Forkhill and presumed killed.[4] His body was never recovered and he is listed as one of the 'Disappeared'. He was posthumously awarded the George Cross.[5] Several men have been imprisoned for his murder.

1980[edit]

  • 1 January 1980 - Simon Bates (23) and Gerald Hardy (18), both British soldiers, were shot dead in error, by other British soldiers while setting up an ambush position near Forkhill.[6]

1984[edit]

  • 31 January 1984 - William Savage (27) and Thomas Bingham (29), both Protestant members of the Royal Ulster Constabulary, were killed in a Provisional Irish Republican Army land mine attack on their armoured patrol car, near Forkhill.[7]

1993[edit]

  • 17 March 1993 - Lawrence Dickson (26), a member of the British Army, was shot and killed by an IRA sniper while on foot patrol along Bog Road, Forkhill[8][9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Sutton Index of Deaths, 1974". Conflict Archive on the Internet (CAIN). Retrieved 2 September 2006. 
  2. ^ "Sutton Index of Deaths, 1975". Conflict Archive on the Internet (CAIN). Retrieved 5 December 2011. 
  3. ^ "Northern Ireland, Forkhill explosions". House of Lords Hansard, 21 July 1975 vol 363 cc30-6. Retrieved 5 December 2011. 
  4. ^ "Sutton Index of Deaths, 1977". Conflict Archive on the Internet (CAIN). Retrieved 5 December 2011. 
  5. ^ "A Chronology of the Conflict, 1977". Conflict Archive on the Internet (CAIN). Retrieved 5 December 2011. 
  6. ^ "Sutton Index of Deaths, 1980". Conflict Archive on the Internet (CAIN). Retrieved 5 December 2011. 
  7. ^ "Sutton Index of Deaths, 1984". Conflict Archive on the Internet (CAIN). Retrieved 5 December 2011. 
  8. ^ McKittrick, David; Seamus Kelters, Brian Feeney, Chris Thornton (2000). Lost Lives. Mainstream Publishing, p. 1314; ISBN 1-84018-227-X
  9. ^ "Sutton Index of Deaths, 1993". Conflict Archive on the Internet (CAIN). Retrieved 5 December 2011.