The Varsity (newspaper)

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The Varsity
The Varsity
Type Weekly newspaper
Format Compact
Owner(s) Varsity Publications
Editor Jacob Lorinc
Founded 1880
Language English
Headquarters 21 Sussex Ave., 2nd floor, Toronto, ON, M5S 1J6, Canada
Circulation 20,000
ISSN 0042-2789
Website thevarsity.ca

The Varsity is one of the main student newspapers of the University of Toronto. In publication since 1880, it is the second-oldest student newspaper in Canada.[citation needed]

The paper publishes weekly during the university semesters and online throughout the year. Originally a broadsheet daily, it now issues in compact form. The paper's primary focus is on campus affairs and general interest news

The Varsity usually assumes a left-of-centre stance on political affairs. The paper is published by Varsity Publications, a not-for-profit corporation, and is primarily financed by advertisement revenues with subsidies from a student levy.

History[edit]

At the height of debate on coeducation in 1880, The Varsity published an article in its inaugural issue voicing in favour of admitting women.[1]

In 1895, the suspension of The Varsity's editor, James Tucker, led Latin Professor Dale to publicly attack the administration in The Globe, which in turn led to his own dismissal.[2] University College students then approved a motion by Varsity staff member William Lyon Mackenzie King and boycotted lectures for a week. This is significant for William Lyon Mackenzie King's involvement as a member of the Varsity editorial staff and student leader. He would later become Canada's longest serving Prime Minister.[3][4]

After Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau decriminalized homosexuality in 1969, a medical research assistant placed an advertisement in The Varsity seeking volunteers to establish the first university homophile association in Canada.[5]

Notable past staff[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "What was front page news in the inaugural issue of the student paper The Varsity in 1880?". History Q & A. University of Toronto Department of Public Affairs. 2002. Retrieved 2007-07-19. [dead link]
  2. ^ Q&A: What made the "blood fairly boil" in U of T student and future prime minister William Lyon Mackenzie King in 1895?
  3. ^ "What made the "blood fairly boil" in U of T student and future prime minister William Lyon Mackenzie King in 1895?". History Q & A. University of Toronto Department of Public Affairs. 2002. Retrieved 2007-09-24. [dead link]
  4. ^ Marshall, David B. (2000). "Dale, William". Dictionary of Canadian Biography. Retrieved 2009-02-28. 
  5. ^ Bébout, Rick (January 2000). "Conception & birth". On the Origins of the Body Politic. Retrieved 2009-02-28. 
 6. Stop censoring student journalists - we're trying to hold universities to account

External links[edit]