The Wheel of Time (TV series)

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The Wheel of Time
GenreFantasy
Created byRafe Judkins
Based onThe Wheel of Time series
by Robert Jordan
Starring
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
Production
Executive producer(s)
Running time60 minutes
Production company(s)
Release
Original networkPrime Video

The Wheel of Time is an upcoming American epic fantasy web television series set to premiere on Prime Video. The series is based on Robert Jordan's novel series of the same name, and is produced by Sony Pictures Television and Amazon Studios, with Rafe Judkins serving as showrunner.

Premise[edit]

The Wheel of Time follows Moiraine, a member of the powerful, all-woman organization of channellers (magic-users) called the Aes Sedai, who takes a group of five young people from their home village following an attack by the forces of the Dark One, a malevolent evil entity who seeks to remake the world in his image. Among these five, she believes one might be the reincarnation of the Dragon, an ancient hero and powerful channeller who is prophesied to either save the world or destroy it.[1]

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

In 2000, NBC optioned the screen rights to Robert Jordan's fantasy novel series The Wheel of Time but did not ultimately proceed with the production.[1] In 2004, Jordan sold the film, television, video game, and comic rights to the series to production company Red Eagle Entertainment.[1] In 2015, Red Eagle Entertainment paid air time to cable network FXX to air Winter Dragon, a 22-minute pilot for a potential The Wheel of Time series starring Billy Zane and Max Ryan that allowed Red Eagle to hold on to the rights to the project.[6] Subsequently, the company sued Jordan's widow, Harriet McDougal, for her comments about the pilot[7] and the lawsuit was resolved in 2016.[8]

On April 20, 2017, it was announced that Sony Pictures Television was producing a new adaptation of the book series in association with Red Eagle Entertainment and Radar Pictures. Rafe Judkins was expected to serve as showrunner for the series and executive produce alongside Rick Selvage, Larry Mondragon, Ted Field, Mike Weber, and Darren Lemke. Robert Jordan's widow Harriet McDougal was set to serve as a consulting producer.[9]

On October 2, 2018, it was announced that Amazon had given the production a series order. Additionally, it was further announced that Amazon Studios would serve as a production company for the series.[1][10][11] On February 19, 2019, Uta Briesewitz was confirmed as director for the first two episodes.[12] Principal photography for the first season started on September 16, 2019.[13]

Casting[edit]

It was announced in June 2019 that Rosamund Pike had been cast as the lead in the series.[2] Further main cast members were announced in August 2019: Josha Stradowski as Rand al'Thor, Marcus Rutherford as Perrin Aybara, Zoë Robins as Nynaeve al'Meara, Barney Harris as Mat Cauthon, and Madeleine Madden as Egwene al'Vere.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d White, Peter (October 2, 2018). "Amazon Orders Adaptation Of Fantasy Drama The Wheel of Time To Series". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on October 2, 2018. Retrieved October 2, 2018.
  2. ^ a b Petski, Denise (June 19, 2019). "Rosamund Pike To Star In The Wheel Of Time TV Adaptation At Amazon". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on June 23, 2019. Retrieved July 1, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Otterson, Joe (August 14, 2019). "'Wheel of Time' Series at Amazon Rounds Out Main Cast". Variety. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  4. ^ Purslow, Matt (September 4, 2019). "al'Lan Mandragoran Cast for The Wheel of Time". IGN. Archived from the original on September 4, 2019. Retrieved September 4, 2019.
  5. ^ Smith, Andrew (November 6, 2019). "Game of Thrones Actor Joins Wheel of Time as Rand's Father Tam". IGN. Archived from the original on November 8, 2019. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  6. ^ Gartenberg, Chaim (February 9, 2015). "A Wheel of Time pilot was produced and aired when no one was looking". The Verge. Archived from the original on October 3, 2018. Retrieved October 2, 2018.
  7. ^ Gardner, Eriq (February 13, 2015). "FXX Pilot Airing at 1:30 a.m. Leads to Eye-Opening Slander Lawsuit". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on October 2, 2018. Retrieved October 2, 2018.
  8. ^ Trendacosta, Katharine (April 28, 2016). "The Wheel of Time Is Going to Be a TV Series After All". io9. Archived from the original on October 2, 2018. Retrieved October 2, 2018.
  9. ^ Otterson, Joe (April 20, 2017). "Wheel of Time TV Series Lands at Sony". Variety. Archived from the original on September 24, 2018. Retrieved October 2, 2018.
  10. ^ Ritman, Alex (October 2, 2018). "Wheel of Time Fantasy Drama Nabs Amazon Series Order". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on October 2, 2018. Retrieved October 2, 2018.
  11. ^ Keslassy, Elsa (October 2, 2018). "Amazon Orders Female-Driven Fantasy Series The Wheel of Time". Variety. Archived from the original on October 2, 2018. Retrieved October 2, 2018.
  12. ^ Andreeva, Nellie; Petski, Denise (February 19, 2019). "The Wheel of Time: Uta Briesewitz To Direct First Two Episodes Of Amazon Fantasy Drama Series". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on March 22, 2019. Retrieved June 26, 2019.
  13. ^ @WoTonPrime (September 16, 2019). "Hey everyone, today is our first day of principal photography" (Tweet). Retrieved September 18, 2019 – via Twitter.

External links[edit]