The World's End, Chelsea

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The World's End

The World's End is a Grade II listed public house at 459 King's Road, Chelsea, London.[1] It gives its name to the surrounding area at the western end of the King's Road.

It was built in 1897, but the architect is not known.[1] Historic England calls it "a fine example of a public house in the gin-palace genre".[1]

The current building replaced earlier buildings, one of which is shown on the north side of Kings Road on the 1795 map; Cary's New And Accurate Plan Of London And Westminster.[2] The old tavern was a noted house of entertainment in the reign of Charles II. The grounds and tea gardens were extensive and it was elegantly fitted out. The house was probably called "The World's End" because of its then considerable distance from London and the bad and dangerous state of the roads leading to it. As it stood close to the River Thames most of the visitors made the journey by boat.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Historic England. "Worlds End Distillery public house (1391649)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  2. ^ "MAPCO Map And Plan Collection Online : Cary's New And Accurate Plan Of London And Westminster 1795.". mapco.net. Retrieved 30 July 2017. 
  3. ^ Old and New London. Originally published by Cassell, Petter & Galpin, London, 1878. Page 87

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 51°28′55″N 0°10′47″W / 51.48194°N 0.17972°W / 51.48194; -0.17972