The Federalist (website)

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The Federalist
Federalist logo.png
Type of site
Online magazine
Available in English
Created by Ben Domenech
Sean Davis
Editor David Harsanyi
Mollie Hemingway
Slogan(s) Be lovers of freedom and anxious for the fray.
Website www.thefederalist.com
Alexa rank Decrease 10,067 (October 2016)[1]
Commercial Yes
Registration Optional, but is required to comment
Launched September 1, 2013; 3 years ago (2013-09-01)
Current status Active

The Federalist is an English-language online magazine that covers politics, policy, culture, and religion.[2] The site was co-founded by Ben Domenech and Sean Davis and launched in September 2013.[3] Domenech serves as publisher of The Federalist.

According to Domenech, the site is dedicated to discussing "the philosophical underpinnings of the day's debate" instead of focusing on what he calls "the horserace or the personalities." The Federalist has been described as influential in conservative and libertarian circles.[4][5][6]

The Federalist also publishes The Transom, a newsletter aimed at political insiders.[7]

History[edit]

The Federalist was co-founded by Ben Domenech and Sean Davis; senior editors include David Harsanyi and Mollie Hemingway.[8][9]

Domenech wrote that The Federalist was inspired by the mission and worldview of the original Time magazine, which he described as, "[leaning] to the political right, with a small-c conservatism equipped with a populist respect for the middle class reader outside of New York and Washington, and an abiding love for America at a time when snark and cynicism were not considered substitutes for smart analysis."[10]

Neil deGrasse Tyson controversy[edit]

In late 2014, The Federalist attracted media coverage when it published articles saying that Neil deGrasse Tyson misquoted George W. Bush in some of his public appearances.[11][12][13][14] Conservative writers cited the story to criticize Tyson over the misquotes.[15][13][16] Mollie Hemingway, senior editor at The Federalist, characterized the internet reaction to the articles as "deeply negative" and "dismissive" of its conclusions, saying reactions to the articles were "cult-like."[14]

Reception[edit]

Writing for Politico, Reid Cherlin described The Federalist as a right-wing news source that "seek[s] to go deep on the issues and sway the conversation in Washington".[17] Matt K. Lewis wrote in The Week that conservative online media was divided between "staid, august publications" and "a new generation of irreverent sites", and that "[s]ites like The Federalist try to bridge the gap by providing serious commentary that is typically written by young, pop culture–savvy writers".[18]

David Weigel from Bloomberg Politics said that The Federalist frequently criticizes left-leaning publications, but was founded with the intention of being "a source of original interviews and real-time arguments between conservatives and libertarians".[9] During the 2016 U.S. presidential election, some political commentators noted a shift in The Federalist's coverage of Donald Trump, first criticizing the presidential candidate, and then, after Trump won the presidency, criticizing Trump's liberal critics in the media and casting Trump as the victim.[19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "thefederalist.com Site Overview". Alexa Internet. Retrieved 2014-11-17. 
  2. ^ Domenech, Ben (September 18, 2013). "Introducing The Federalist". thefederalist.com. Retrieved September 26, 2014. 
  3. ^ Domenech, Ben (September 18, 2013). "Introducing The Federalist". thefederalist.com. Retrieved September 26, 2014. 
  4. ^ "The HuffPo-ization of the Right". Politico.com. Retrieved October 3, 2014. 
  5. ^ Weigel, David. "The Torch Is Being Passed to A New Generation of Right-Wing Media". Archived from the original on December 17, 2014. Retrieved December 17, 2014. 
  6. ^ Howley, Patrick (September 26, 2014). "Conservative Website 'The Federalist; Targeted For Wikipedia Deletion After Criticizing Neil deGrasse Tyson". Daily Caller. Retrieved October 1, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Ben Domenech, Publisher". The Federalist. Retrieved 2016-12-26. 
  8. ^ "Contributors – The Federalist". thefederalist.com. Retrieved October 1, 2014. 
  9. ^ a b Weigel, David. "The Torch Is Being Passed to A New Generation of Right-Wing Media". Archived from the original on December 17, 2014. Retrieved December 17, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Introducing The Federalist". The Federalist. 2013-09-18. Retrieved 2016-12-26. 
  11. ^ "Neil Tyson: Just Trust Me, OK?". RealClearPolitics. Retrieved April 21, 2015. 
  12. ^ "Politico’s dopey climate denial: Global warming might be fake because Neil deGrasse Tyson did something dumb". Salon. Retrieved April 21, 2015. 
  13. ^ a b Lowry, Rich. "The Cult of Neil deGrasse Tyson". Politico. Retrieved April 21, 2015. 
  14. ^ a b "The Right’s War on Neil deGrasse Tyson". The Daily Beast. Retrieved April 19, 2015. 
  15. ^ Adler, Jonathan. "Neil deGrasse Tyson admits he botched Bush quote". Washington Post. Retrieved 2017-01-25. 
  16. ^ "Neil deGrasse Tyson's Text-Burning Followers". National Review. Retrieved 2017-01-25. 
  17. ^ "The HuffPo-ization of the Right". Politico.com. Retrieved October 3, 2014. 
  18. ^ "The state of conservative media". May 19, 2014. Retrieved November 27, 2016. 
  19. ^ Lewis, Matt (June 21, 2017). "The Federalist Embraces Anti-Anti Trumpism, Loses Its Way". The Daily Beast. Retrieved August 13, 2017.