Thelma Plum

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Thelma Plum
A 21-year-old woman is shown in an upper shot. She is holding a microphone on its stand with her right hand while her left is at the other end on the mike. She has her head turned to her left and is looking over her shoulder. She wears a white top and her brown hair is shoulder length. Behind her is stage equipment, blurred and obscured.
Plum in June 2016
Background information
Birth nameThelma Amelina Plumbe
Born (1994-12-21) 21 December 1994 (age 25)
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
OriginDelungra, New South Wales, Australia
GenresFolk[1]
Occupation(s)Musician
Instruments
  • Vocals
  • guitar
Labels
Associated actsGang of Youths, Paul Kelly, Paul McCartney, Adam Briggs
Websitethelmaplum.com

Thelma Amelina Plumbe (born 21 December 1994), known professionally as Thelma Plum, is an Aboriginal Australian singer-songwriter-guitarist from Delungra, New South Wales. Her debut album, Better in Blak, was released in July 2019 and peaked at No. 4 on the ARIA Albums Chart. At the ARIA Music Awards of 2019 she won Best Cover Art for Emilie Pfitzner's work.

Biography[edit]

Thelma Amelina Plumbe was born on 21 December 1994 in Brisbane.[3][4] She is a Gamilaraay woman[5] from Delungra. Plum graduated from the Music Industry College, Brisbane[6] and spent most of her early life in that city.[7]

2012-2017: Triple J Unearthed and Early EPs[edit]

In May 2012, Plum uploaded the tracks "Blackbird" and "Father Said" onto Triple J Unearthed and in July 2012, won the inaugural Triple J's National Indigenous Unearthed Music competition in 2012[5] and was nominated for a Deadly award for Most Promising New Talent..[8] "Father Said" was released in November 2012 as her official debut single. Plum released her debut extended play, Rosie, in March 2013[9] and followed with her second EP, Monsters (July 2014).[10][11] By that time she had relocated to Melbourne.[3]

Plum appeared at Womadelaide in 2014 and 2019,[12] has toured around Australia[10] and has been on rotation nationally on Triple J.[9][13][7]

2018-present: Better in Blak[edit]

Plum released her debut album, Better in Blak, in July 2019.[14] The video for the single, "Better in Blak", was nominated for Film Clip of the Year at the National Indigenous Music Awards.[15][16] In October 2019 she came at No. 7 in Happy Mag's list of "The 15 Australian female artists changing the game right now."[17] At the ARIA Music Awards of 2019 she received six nominations and won Best Cover Art for Emilie Pfitzner's work on her album.[18]

In January 2020, Plum became the highest ranking Indigenous artist ever in the Triple J Hottest 100, when "Better in Blak" charted at number 9.[19] Two months later, she was diagnosed with COVID-19 during the COVID-19 pandemic.[20]

In May 2020, Plum released a cover of Powderfinger's "These Days".[21] In October, Plum will perform at the 2020 AFL Grand Final.[22]

Discography[edit]

Studio albums[edit]

Title Details Peak chart positions
AUS
[23]
Better in Blak 4

Extended plays[edit]

List of extended plays released, with selected details about release date and label
Title Details
Rosie
  • Released: 15 March 2013[25]
  • Label: Footstomp
  • Formats: CD,[26] digital download, streaming
Monsters
  • Released: 4 July 2014[27]
  • Label: Footstomp, Warner Music Australia
  • Formats: CD,[28] digital download, streaming

Singles[edit]

As lead artist[edit]

List of singles as lead artist, with selected chart positions and certifications shown
Title Year Peak chart positions Certifications Album
AUS
[29]
"Father Said"[30] 2012 Rosie
"Around Here"[31] 2013
"Dollar"[32]
"How Much Does Your Love Cost"
(original or Dugong Jr remix)[33][34]
2014 Monsters
"Monsters"[35]
"Young in Love"[36]
"Clair de Lune" 2018 Non-album single
"Clumsy Love" Better in Blak
"Not Angry Anymore"[38] 2019
"Better in Blak" 89
"These Days"[21] 2020 Non-album single

As featured artist[edit]

List of singles as featured artist, with year released and album shown
Title Year Album
"No One"
(Golden Features featuring Thelma Plum)[39]
2015 XXIV
"Any Other Name"
(Horrorshow with Thelma Plum, Jimblah and Urthboy)[40]
non album single
"Ticket to Heaven"
(Alice Ivy featuring Thelma Plum)[41]
2020 Don't Sleep
"Go to War"
(Briggs featuring Thelma Plum)[42]
2020 Always Was

Awards[edit]

APRA Awards[edit]

The APRA Awards are held in Australia and New Zealand by the Australasian Performing Right Association to recognise songwriting skills, sales and airplay performance by its members annually. Plum has been nominated for two awards.[43][44]

Year Nominee / work Award Result
2020 "Better in Blak" Song of the Year Nominated
herself Breakthrough Songwriter of the Year Nominated

ARIA Awards[edit]

The ARIA Music Awards is an annual awards ceremony that recognises excellence, innovation, and achievement across all genres of Australian music. Thelma Plum won an award from six nominations in 2019.[18][45][46]

Year Nominee / work Award Result
2019 Emilie Pfitzner for Thelma Plum - Better in Blak Best Cover Art Won
Claudia Sangiorgi Dalimore for Thelma Plum – "Better in Blak" Best Video Nominated
Better in Blak Album of the Year Nominated
Best Female Artist Nominated
Best Pop Release Nominated
Breakthrough Artist Nominated

Australian Music Prize[edit]

The Australian Music Prize (the AMP) is an annual award of $30,000 given to an Australian band or solo artist in recognition of the merit of an album released during the year of award.

Year Nominee / work Award Result
Australian Music Prize 2019 Better in Blak[47] Album of the Year Nominated

J Awards[edit]

The J Awards are an annual series of Australian music awards that were established by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's youth-focused radio station Triple J. They commenced in 2005.

Year Nominee / work Award Result
J Awards of 2012 herself Unearthed Artist of the Year Nominated
J Awards of 2019[48] Better in Blak Australian Album of the Year Nominated
"Better in Blak" Australian Video of the Year Nominated

National Indigenous Music Awards[edit]

The National Indigenous Music Awards (NIMAs) is an annual awards ceremony that recognises the achievements of Indigenous Australians in music. Thelma Plum has won two awards.

Year Nominee / work Award Result
2013 Thelma Plum Best New Talent Won
2015 "How Much Does Your Love Cost?" Song of the Year Won
2019 Better in Blak Album of the Year Nominated
"Better in Blak" Song of the Year Nominated
2020[49][50] Thelma Plum Artist of the Year Nominated
"Homecoming Queen" Song of the Year Nominated

National Live Music Awards[edit]

The National Live Music Awards (NLMAs) are a broad recognition of Australia's diverse live industry, celebrating the success of the Australian live scene. The awards commenced in 2016.

Year Nominee / work Award Result
National Live Music Awards of 2019[51][52] herself Live Voice of the Year Nominated
Queensland Live Voice of the Year Won

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Thelma Plum:On a Roll", The Weekly Review Eastern, 14 February 2013
  2. ^ Warner Music Australia (30 May 2019). "Thelma Plum announces debut album 'Better In Blak' with new video". Warner Music Australia. Retrieved 31 May 2019.
  3. ^ a b Mathieson, Craig (8 July 2019). "Thelma Plum: 'I was lucky ... to take a bad situation and make something beautiful'". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 30 November 2019.
  4. ^ "'Around Here' at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA) Australasian Mechanical Copyright Owners Society (AMCOS). Retrieved 30 November 2019. Note: For additional work user may have to select 'Search again' and then 'Enter a title:' &/or 'Performer:'
  5. ^ a b Shedden, Iain (27 July 2012), "Singer wants her indigenous culture to shine", The Australian
  6. ^ "Six of best in rosy debut", Gold Coast Sun - Central, 17 July 2013
  7. ^ a b Fedele, Robert (13 June 2014). "Singer-songwriter Thelma Plum branches out". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 4 October 2016.
  8. ^ "Landing a Plum Role", Hobart Mercury, 2 May 2013
  9. ^ a b "Music Plum Sound", The Cairns Post, 30 May 2013
  10. ^ a b Fedele, Robert (16 June 2014), "Unearthed and on the road to stardom", The Age
  11. ^ NOEL MENGEL (25 September 2012). "Teen singer Thelma Plum in tune with her culture at the Deadlys". The Courier-Mail. Retrieved 4 October 2016.
  12. ^ "Welcoming back in 2019". Womadelaide. Retrieved 4 September 2019.
  13. ^ MEL EVANS (15 November 2014). "Singer Thelma Plum loving life on the road during her national tour". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 4 October 2016.
  14. ^ a b Gallagher, Allison (29 May 2019). "Thelma Plum announces debut album 'Better In Blak', National Tour dates & shares moving new video". Music Feeds. Retrieved 31 May 2019.
  15. ^ "National Indigenous Music Awards unveils 2019 Nominations". National Indigenous Music Awards. July 2019. Retrieved 19 August 2019.
  16. ^ "Record Breaking Crowd for the 2019 National Indigenous Music Awards!". National Indigenous Music Awards. 13 August 2019. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  17. ^ "The 15 Australian female artists changing the game right now". Retrieved 30 October 2019.
  18. ^ a b "ARIA Awards: 2019 Fine Arts & Artisan Winners Announced". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). 10 October 2019. Retrieved 11 October 2019.
  19. ^ "Thelma Plum has transformed trauma into Hottest 100 history". ABC. January 2020. Retrieved 28 May 2020.
  20. ^ "Thelma Plum has been diagnosed with coronavirus". ABC. 15 March 2020.
  21. ^ a b "Thelma Plum shares gorgeous cover of Powderfinger's "These Days"". ABC. 28 May 2020. Retrieved 29 May 2020.
  22. ^ "All-Aussie music lineup announced for AFL's grand final at the Gabba". SMH. 12 October 2020. Retrieved 14 October 2020.
  23. ^ "ARIA Australian Top 50 Albums". Australian Recording Industry Association. 22 July 2019. Retrieved 20 July 2019.
  24. ^ "Thelma Plum announces debut album 'Better In Blak' with new video". Warner Music Australia. 30 May 2019. Retrieved 31 May 2019.
  25. ^ "Rosie – EP by Thelma Plum on Apple Music". iTunes Australia. 15 March 2013. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  26. ^ "Rosie – CD by Thelma Plum at Sanity". Sanity. 15 March 2013. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  27. ^ McNamara, Justine. "Review: Thelma Plum – Monsters EP – Music Feeds". Music Feeds. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  28. ^ "Monsters — CD by Thelma Plum". Warner Music Australasia. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  29. ^ "ARIA Chart Watch #562". auspOp. 1 February 2020. Retrieved 1 February 2020.
  30. ^ "Father Said – Single by Thelma Plum on Apple Music". Apple Music AU. 20 November 2012. Retrieved 16 June 2020.
  31. ^ "Around Here – Single by Thelma Plum on Apple Music". Apple Music AU. 13 February 2013. Retrieved 16 June 2020.
  32. ^ "Thelma Plum – Dollar". AIRIT. 16 May 2013. Retrieved 1 October 2019.
  33. ^ Beth, Sinead (13 June 2014). "Thelma Plum – How Much Does Your Love Cost?". SpeakerTV. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  34. ^ "New: Thelma Plum – How Much Does Your Love Cost (Dugong Jr Remix)". Pilerats. 13 June 2014. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  35. ^ "Thelma Plum – Monsters". AIRIT. 16 July 2014. Retrieved 1 October 2019.
  36. ^ "Young in Love (The Remixes) – Single by Thelma Plum – Single by Thelma Plum on Apple Music". Apple Music AU. 15 December 2014. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  37. ^ "ARIA Charts – Accreditations – 2019 Singles". ARIA. 31 December 2019. Retrieved 16 June 2020.
  38. ^ English, Laura (1 February 2019). "Thelma Plum releases cathartic new single & video "Not Angry Anymore"". Music Feeds. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  39. ^ Davies, Hayden (5 June 2015). "Listen: Golden Features – No One feat. Thelma Plum". Pilerats. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  40. ^ "Any Other Name- single on Apple Music". Apple Music AU. August 2015. Retrieved 28 August 2020.
  41. ^ "Alice Ivy shares highly-anticipated new album "Don't Sleep" via Dew Process including latest single 'Ticket to Heaven' featuring Thelma Plum". The Partae. 18 July 2020. Retrieved 30 July 2020.
  42. ^ Newstead, Al (7 August 2020). "First Spin: Briggs taps Thelma Plum for haunting collab "Go to War"". ABC. Retrieved 7 August 2020.
  43. ^ "Tones and I Leads Nominations for 2020 Virtual APRA Awards". Noise11. 7 April 2020. Retrieved 7 April 2020.
  44. ^ "2020 Awards". APRA. 7 April 2020. Retrieved 7 April 2020.
  45. ^ "ARIA Awards: 2019 ARIA Awards Nominated Artists Revealed". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). 10 October 2019. Retrieved 11 October 2019.
  46. ^ "2019 ARIA Award Winners Announced". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). 27 November 2019. Retrieved 29 November 2019.
  47. ^ "AMP winner Sampa The Great creates history". Sydney Morning Herald. 6 March 2020. Retrieved 13 April 2020.
  48. ^ "The J Award 2019". Triple J. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 2019. Retrieved 15 August 2020.
  49. ^ "Announcement: National Indigenous Music Awards Finalists Unveiled". noise11. 13 July 2020. Retrieved 18 July 2020.
  50. ^ "2020 Finalists". NIMA. July 2020. Retrieved 18 July 2020.
  51. ^ "HERE ARE YOUR 2019 NATIONAL LIVE MUSIC AWARDS NOMINEES!". NLMA. 22 October 2020. Retrieved 5 September 2020.
  52. ^ "AND THE WINNERS OF THE 2019 NATIONAL LIVE MUSIC AWARDS ARE…". NLMA. 5 December 2020. Retrieved 5 September 2020.

External links[edit]