Theodore Rex (film)

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Theodore Rex
Theodore-rex-DVD.jpg
Theodore Rex Canadian video poster
Directed byJonathan Betuel
Produced byRichard Gilbert Abramson
Sue Baden-Powell
Written byJonathan Betuel
StarringWhoopi Goldberg
Armin Mueller-Stahl
George Newbern
Kenneth Londoner
Music byRobert Folk
CinematographyDavid Tattersall
Edited bySteve Mirkovich
Rick Shaine
Distributed byNew Line Cinema
Release date
  • July 2, 1996 (1996-07-02)
[1]
Running time
92 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$33.5 million[2][3]

Theodore Rex, also known as T. Rex,[4][5] is a 1995[6] buddy cop science-fiction family film written and directed by Jonathan Betuel and starring Whoopi Goldberg. Though originally intended for theatrical release, the film went direct-to-video, and consequently became the most expensive direct-to-video film ever made at the time of its release.[7][8][9]

The film was not well-received,[5][10] and saw Whoopi Goldberg being nominated for Worst Actress at the 1996 Golden Raspberry Awards.[11] It is the first, and so far only, direct-to-video movie to receive any sort of Razzie nomination.[12]

Plot[edit]

In an alternate futuristic society where humans and anthropomorphic dinosaurs co-exist, a tough police detective named Katie Coltraine (Whoopi Goldberg) is paired with a Tyrannosaurus named Theodore Rex (George Newbern) to find the killer of dinosaurs and other prehistoric animals leading them to a ruthless billionaire bent on killing off mankind by creating a new ice age.

Cast[edit]

Puppeteers[edit]

Voices[edit]

Additional Voices provided by Billy Bowles, Rodger Bumpass, Jennifer Darling, Denise Dowse, Bill Farmer, Anne Lockhart, Sherry Lynn, Mickie McGowan, Patrick Pinney, and Philip Proctor.

Reception[edit]

Theodore Rex received negative reviews from critics and audiences. Reviewer Luke Baldock called it "a horrific mess of a movie. It starts with an opening crawl and narration that tells us 'Once upon a time in the future...' already it's losing me."

In a 2015 interview with the Brazilian newspaper Folha de S.Paulo, Goldberg stated that this is the only film she regrets ever having done: "Don't ask me why I did it, I didn't want to", she said.[13]

Goldberg lawsuit[edit]

Though Whoopi Goldberg had made a verbal agreement to star in the film in October 1992,[14] she attempted to back out. Abramson filed a US$20 million lawsuit against Goldberg, which was settled quickly. Goldberg agreed to star in the film for $7 million,[2] $2 million more than the amount originally agreed upon.[7]

One of the attorneys on the case described this as being similar to the legal battle of Kim Basinger when she backed out of the film Boxing Helena.[7]

Distribution[edit]

The film was originally intended for theatrical release in North America; New Line Cinema initially wanted to release it to coincide with Goldberg's hosting stint at the Academy Awards that year.[14] New Line ultimately decided that it was in their best interests to release the film direct-to-video. This decision came as a result of failed test screenings in Las Vegas, Memphis, Portland, Maine and Providence.[7][15] The film's $33.5 million budget made it the most expensive direct-to-video release at that time.[7]

The international distributors to whom New Line had pre-sold the rights to the film adopted a different release strategy by distributing theatrically in every country except the United States and Italy.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Blowen, Michael (1996-06-30). "Mel Brooks' 'Dracula' is just not batty enough; THE MOVIE SECTION / Video Watch". The Boston Globe. p. B31.
  2. ^ a b Love, Dennis (1996-04-04). "'Rex' Headed for Extinction?". People. UPI Newswire.
  3. ^ Dutka, Elaine (1996-04-11). "Whoopi's Dino Disaster; Test Audiences Reject $ 33.5 Million Family Comedy". Chicago Sun-Times. p. 33.
  4. ^ "Filming in the U.S.". Daily Variety. 1994-11-18.
  5. ^ a b Griffin, Gil (1997-10-23). "Reading Whoopi Goldberg like a 'Book'". The San Diego Union-Tribune. p. E-1.
  6. ^ Blowen, Michael (1996-06-30). "'Rex': Extinct on the Big Screen". The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2012-07-31.
  7. ^ a b c d e Cox, Dan (1996-04-08). "New Line's dino pic extinct from bigscreen". Daily Variety. p. 9.
  8. ^ Hubert, Andrea (2008-06-14). "The incredible sulk". The Guardian. Retrieved 2008-06-27.
  9. ^ Wilkinson, Jack (1996-07-27). "What's new on the home video scene". United Press International.
  10. ^ Meyers, Randy (1999-02-02). "Direct hits: Lucrative video arena attracting first-run, first-rate". Contra Costa Times.
  11. ^ Scott, Vernon (1997-01-23). "The Hollywood Reporter". UPI Newswire.
  12. ^ Baldock, Luke Ryan (9 August 2012). "10 Terrible Dinosaur Films That Should Be Extinct!". thehollywoodnews.com.
  13. ^ "'Não há muito espaço para negros por aí', diz Whoopi Goldberg – 25/02/2015 – Ilustrada – Folha de S.Paulo". uol.com.br.
  14. ^ a b c Blowen, Michael (1996-06-30). "'Rex': Extinct on the Big Screen". The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2012-07-31.
  15. ^ Klady, Leonard (1996-07-01). "Theodore Rex". Daily Variety. Retrieved 2008-06-28.

External links[edit]