Thierry Hermès

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Thierry Hermès
ThierryHermès.jpg
Born
10 January 1801

Died10 January 1878 (aged 77)
Spouse(s)Christine Pétronille Pierrart
ChildrenCharles-Émile Hermès
Parent(s)Thierry Hermès
Agnese Kuhnen

Thierry Hermès founded a fashion house, Hermès International, and acquired the title as a fashion house designer.[1] He was born in 1801 in the city known today as Krefeld, Germany.[2] Hermès originally established his business as a saddle company in 1837.[3] His first workshop showcased jewelry, home decor items, and silk scarves.[4] His father Thierry Hermès originated from France and his mother, Agnese Kuhnen originated from Germany.[citation needed] He lost his family due to disease and moved to Paris in 1821.[5] After his death in 1878, his son and grandsons Charles-Emile Hermès, Adolphe Hermès and Emile-Maurice, continued to run the family business.[6]

Early life[edit]

Thierry Hermès was born in 1801 in the city of Krefeld, which at the time was part of Napoleon's empire, earning Hermès French citizenship.[7] He was the sixth child of his parents who were innkeepers[8]. After he lost his entire family to disease and war, he moved to France in 1821 as an orphan.[9] Using his gift in leatherworking, he opened his saddle and harness shop in 1837 located in the Paris neighborhood known as Grands Boulevard.[10]

Career[edit]

In 1837, Thierry Hermès founded the Hermès company as a manufacturer of horse harnesses on the Rue Basse du Rempart in Paris. [11] Hermès specialized in the horse harnesses required by society traps, caleches, and carriages.[12] He built his business on the strength of a stitch that could only be done by hand.[13] The saddle stitch was completed when two needles worked two waxed linen threads in tensile opposition.[14] After opening up his shop, his clients were the rich which included: the Parisian beau monde and European royalty, the emperor Napoleon III and his empress, Eugenie.[15] The business soon went from harness and saddles to trunks, handbags, and zippers.[16]

Children[edit]

Hermès had one son with his wife Christine Pétronille Pierrart (1805-1896) who they named Charles-Emile.[17] [18] Charles-Emile had two sons of his own, Adolphe and Emile-Maurice, who were involved in the family business building elite clientele in Europe, North Africa, Russia, America, and Asia.[19] [20] After Hermès started his harness company, his son Charles-Emile Hermès took over the family business moving the store to 24 rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré.[21] This meant that the store was in proximity to wealthy clients.[22] [23] Adolphe left Emile with the business because he believed that the company didn't have a long future in the era of carriages. [24]Emile-Maurice noticed the demand for saddlery, leading him to direct Hermès to make "saddle stitched" leather goods and trunks for the customers who traveled by car, train, ship. [25] After realizing the company was diving into the age of automobiles, Emile- Maurice acquired a two-year patent for the zipper which was known as the "Hermès Fastener."[26] Once the zipper was introduced, the clothing era was transformed.[27] Other businesses such as Coco Chanel wanted to learn from them due to their rapid growth and popularity.[28] Emile Hermès' sons-in-law, Robert Dumas-Hermès (1898-1978) and Jean-René Guerrand-Hermès (1901-1993) took over the company in 1950.[29] The contributions from his children and grandchildren influenced the company."[30] In 1993, the company went public but 80 percent of the shares were controlled by Hermès family members.[31]

Legacy[edit]

Hermès has many innovations which are still known to this day.[32] The Hermès zipper founded in 1923 is used in many of the bags today.[33] The silk Hermès used for jockeys' blouses developed the first silk scarf, "Jeu des Omnibus et Dames blanches" in 1923.[34] Around the 1930s, Hermès International launched several items that became classics, including the large crocodile handbag known later as the Kelly, named for Grace Kelly.[35] [36] The company later developed men's neckties, watches, and new scarf designs.[37] Today, Hermès features products like charms (starting at $40) and an oversize panda-bear bean-bag made of Clémnce bull-calf leather (most expensive at $100,000).[38] One of the known classics, the Birkin, was named after actress Jane Birkin and created by Jean-Louis Dumas in 1984.[39] Today, Hermès has 283 stores worldwide. [40] Since 1923, Hermès has a color theme every year for their collections, creating limited edition items like the "Year of the River" (2005) silk scarf.[41]


References[edit]

  1. ^ Vanity Fair, Issues 562-565. Condé Nast Publications. 2007.
  2. ^ Vanity Fair, Issues 562-565. Condé Nast Publications. 2007.
  3. ^ Vanity Fair, Issues 562-565. Condé Nast Publications. 2007.
  4. ^ Vanity Fair, Issues 562-565. Condé Nast Publications. 2007.
  5. ^ Vanity Fair, Issues 562-565. Condé Nast Publications. 2007.
  6. ^ Adams, Susan. "Inside Hermès: Luxury's Secret Empire". Forbes.
  7. ^ Vanity Fair, Issues 562-565. Condé Nast Publications. 2007.
  8. ^ Vanity Fair, Issues 562-565. Condé Nast Publications. 2007.
  9. ^ Vanity Fair, Issues 562-565. Condé Nast Publications. 2007.
  10. ^ GuÈRin, Polly (2007). Family Tradition. Art & Antiques Vol. 30 Issue 7. pp. 99–103.
  11. ^ Vanity Fair, Issues 562-565. Condé Nast Publications. 2007.
  12. ^ Vanity Fair, Issues 562-565. Condé Nast Publications. 2007.
  13. ^ Vanity Fair, Issues 562-565. Condé Nast Publications. 2007.
  14. ^ Vanity Fair, Issues 562-565. Condé Nast Publications. 2007.
  15. ^ Vanity Fair, Issues 562-565. Condé Nast Publications. 2007.
  16. ^ Adams, Susan. "Inside Hermès: Luxury's Secret Empire". Forbes.
  17. ^ Adams, Susan. "Inside Hermès: Luxury's Secret Empire". Forbes.
  18. ^ GuÈRin, Polly (2007). Family Tradition. Art & Antiques Vol. 30 Issue 7. pp. 99–103.
  19. ^ Adams, Susan. "Inside Hermès: Luxury's Secret Empire". Forbes.
  20. ^ GuÈRin, Polly (2007). Family Tradition. Art & Antiques Vol. 30 Issue 7. pp. 99–103.
  21. ^ GuÈRin, Polly (2007). Family Tradition. Art & Antiques Vol. 30 Issue 7. pp. 99–103.
  22. ^ GuÈRin, Polly (2007). Family Tradition. Art & Antiques Vol. 30 Issue 7. pp. 99–103.
  23. ^ Adams, Susan. "Inside Hermès: Luxury's Secret Empire". Forbes.
  24. ^ Adams, Susan. "Inside Hermès: Luxury's Secret Empire". Forbes.
  25. ^ GuÈRin, Polly (2007). Family Tradition. Art & Antiques Vol. 30 Issue 7. pp. 99–103.
  26. ^ GuÈRin, Polly (2007). Family Tradition. Art & Antiques Vol. 30 Issue 7. pp. 99–103.
  27. ^ GuÈRin, Polly (2007). Family Tradition. Art & Antiques Vol. 30 Issue 7. pp. 99–103.
  28. ^ Vanity Fair, Issues 562-565. Condé Nast Publications. 2007.
  29. ^ Adams, Susan. "Inside Hermès: Luxury's Secret Empire". Forbes.
  30. ^ GuÈRin, Polly (2007). Family Tradition. Art & Antiques Vol. 30 Issue 7. pp. 99–103.
  31. ^ GuÈRin, Polly (2007). Family Tradition. Art & Antiques Vol. 30 Issue 7. pp. 99–103.
  32. ^ GuÈRin, Polly (2007). Family Tradition. Art & Antiques Vol. 30 Issue 7. pp. 99–103.
  33. ^ GuÈRin, Polly (2007). Family Tradition. Art & Antiques Vol. 30 Issue 7. pp. 99–103.
  34. ^ GuÈRin, Polly (2007). Family Tradition. Art & Antiques Vol. 30 Issue 7. pp. 99–103.
  35. ^ GuÈRin, Polly (2007). Family Tradition. Art & Antiques Vol. 30 Issue 7. pp. 99–103.
  36. ^ Vanity Fair, Issues 562-565. Condé Nast Publications. 2007.
  37. ^ GuÈRin, Polly (2007). Family Tradition. Art & Antiques Vol. 30 Issue 7. pp. 99–103.
  38. ^ Cristobal, Sarah (2011). ONE FOR ALL: HERMÈS EXCLUSIVES Issue 3598. Harper's Bazaar. p. 124.
  39. ^ GuÈRin, Polly (2007). Family Tradition. Art & Antiques Vol. 30 Issue 7. pp. 99–103.
  40. ^ Vanity Fair, Issues 562-565. Condé Nast Publications. 2007.
  41. ^ GuÈRin, Polly (2007). Family Tradition. Art & Antiques Vol. 30 Issue 7. pp. 99–103.