Thine Be the Glory

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Thine Be the Glory
by George Frideric Handel
The Resurrection of Christ by Raffaellino del Garbo (1510)
The Resurrection of Christ by Raffaellino del Garbo (1510)
Native name"A Toi la Gloire."
GenreHymn
OccasionEaster
Written1923
TextEdmond Budry, translated by Richard Hoyle
LanguageEnglish
Meter10.11.11.11 with refrain
MelodyMaccabeus
Composed1747

Thine Be the Glory, Risen Conquering Son (French: À toi la gloire O Ressuscité), also titled Thine Is the Glory,[1] is a Christian hymn for Easter, written by the Swiss Protestant minister, Edmond Budry (1854–1932), and set to the tune of the chorus "See, the Conqu'ring hero comes" from the third section of Handel's oratorio Judas Maccabaeus. The hymn is sometimes sung at weddings or funerals.

An English translation was made in 1923 by Richard Birch Hoyle (1875–1939). The German Advent hymn Tochter Zion, freue dich uses the same tune.

History[edit]

Tune[edit]

"Thine Be the Glory" is sung to the hymn tune Maccabaeus. The tune was originally written by the German-British composer George Frideric Handel. He composed it initially for his 1747 oratorio Joshua, in which it features as a chorus, "See, the Conquering Hero Comes!", celebrating the military victories of the Biblical figure Joshua. The chorus is sung three times, and its final rendition is accompanied by a military side drum.[2] It is thought that Handel may have taken inspiration from a march in Componimenti musicali written by Georg Muffat. Handel was confident that the tune would prove popular, and claimed to the music historian John Hawkins that “You will live to see it a greater favourite with the people than my other fine things.” So confident was Handel of its popularity that he added the chorus to his other oratorio Judas Maccabaeus, written the previous year. "See, the Conquering Hero Comes!" was repurposed to celebrate the military victory of another Old Testament figure, Judas Maccabaeus.[3] Handel's tune bears some historic anti-Jacobite associations. The composition of Judas Maccabaeus was reportedly influenced by Frederick, Prince of Wales; the subject matter of an old testament military victory was chosen as an oblique tribute to the victory of his brother, the Duke of Cumberland, at the Battle of Culloden in April 1746.[4]

In 1796, Ludwig van Beethoven composed twelve variations on "See, the Conquering Hero Comes!" for both piano and cello.[5]

Text[edit]

Hymn writer Edmond Louis Budry (1854–1932)

Handel's popular chorus tune was first put to use as a hymn tune in Harmonia Sacra, a hymnal compiled in 1754 by Thomas Butts, in which it is used as a setting for Charles Wesley's hymn "Christ the Lord Is Risen Today". His choice of Handel's militaristic theme was intended to reinforce the metaphor the resurrected Christ as a victorious warrior who has vanquished death and the powers of evil.[6][7]

In 1884, Handel's tune was used as a setting for a new French-language hymn, "A Toi la Gloire." It was written by Edmond Louis Budry, a minister of the Swiss Eglise évangélique du Canton de Vaud. It is reported that he was inspired to write it after the death of his first wife, Marie de Vayenborg in Lausanne, Switzerland.[8][9] It was later published in French hymn book Chants Evangéliques (1885),[1] and in the YMCA Hymnbook (1904).[8]

The hymn was first translated from French into English by Richard Birch Hoyle in 1923.[1][8] He was commissioned to translate the hymn by the World Student Christian Federation after Budry granted authorisation to reproduce it from the French version.[10] It was later published in the World Student Christian Federation's hymn book, Cantate Domino Hymnal.[9] World Student Christian Federation retained copyright on Hoyle's English translation.[1] The hymn's popularity was cemented when it was included in The Methodist Hymn Book in 1933.[11] Today it features in several popular hymnals, including The New English Hymnal[12] Singing the Faith[13] and The Church Hymnary.[14]

Budry's text also celebrates the Resurrection of Jesus with references to the appearance of angels in the scene of the empty tomb.[15] and uses elements of Isaiah 25:8.[1] The hymn makes particular reference to verses of the First Epistle to the Corinthians in the New Testament (1 Corinthians 15). The central theme of the victorious Christ is drawn from 1 Corinthians 15:57: "But thanks be to God, which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.", while line in the second verse of the hymn, "death hath lost its sting", is taken directly from 1 Corinthians 15:55: "O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory?". The line "No more we doubt thee" may also be a reference to Doubting Thomas.[11]

Other versions[edit]

In 1957 in the Netherlands, Calvin Seerveld used "Thine Be the Glory", with his favourite hymn tune, as a basis to write "Praised Be the Father" for his wedding. A church choir in Hoorn helped the congregation to sing it. In the Netherlands, it is used as a wedding hymn.[16] The Germany Advent hymn Tochter Zion, freue dich (Zion's Daughter)[17] was written by Friedrich Heinrich Ranke using the same tune; It has been argued that Thine Be the Glory was based on this hymn.[9] The hymn was translated into Danish in 1993 and is currently no. 240 in Den Danske Salmebog with the title Dig være ære, Herre over dødens magt.[18] It is listed under Easter psalms, but it also considered appropriate for funerals.

Usage[edit]

The hymn is often used in Easter church services involving the British royal family.[19] It was also played during a service of thanksgiving in commemoration of Queen Elizabeth II's 80th birthday.[20] The hymn is also used during funerals and is listed in the Church of England's funeral services hymn book.[21] During the Last Night of the Proms in the United Kingdom, Thine Be the Glory is played after Fantasia on British Sea Songs with attendees traditionally whistling the tune.[5]

In the Netherlands, the original French version is sung during funerals and weddings of the Dutch Royal Family.

Lyrics[edit]

Below are the original lyrics by Edmond Budry with a literal English translation, and Hoyle's translation:

Original Lyrics Literal translation Hoyle translation

À toi la gloire, O Ressuscité!
À toi la victoire pour l’éternité!
Brillant de lumière, l’ange est descendu,
Il roule la Pierre du tombeau vaincu.
À toi la gloire, O Ressuscité!
À toi la victoire pour l’éternité!

Vois-le paraître: C’est lui, c’est Jésus,
Ton Sauveur, ton Maître, Oh! ne doute plus!
Sois dans l’allégresse, peuple du Seigneur,
Et redis sans cesse: Le Christ est vainqueur!
À toi la gloire, O Ressuscité!
À toi la victoire pour l’éternité!

Craindrais-je encore? Il vit à jamais,
Celui que j’adore, le Prince de paix;
Il est ma victoire, mon puissant soutien,
Ma vie et ma gloire : non, je ne crains rien!
À toi la gloire, O Ressuscité!
À toi la victoire pour l’éternité!

Thine [be] the glory, Oh resurrected One!
Thine [be] the victory, for eternity!
Shining with light, the angel descended,
He rolled the stone from the conquered grave.
Thine [be] the glory, Oh resurrected One!
Thine [be] the victory, for eternity!

Watch Him coming, it's Him, it's Jesus,
Your Saviour, your Master, Oh, doubt no more!
Rejoice, people of the Lord,
And repeat without ending: Christ is Conqueror!
Thine [be] the glory, Oh resurrected One!
Thine [be] the victory, for eternity!

Shall I still fear? He lives forever,
It is Him whom I adore, the Prince of peace;
He is my Victory, my mighty Reliance
my Life and my Glory: no, I fear nothing!
Thine [be] the glory, Oh resurrected One!
Thine [be] the victory, for eternity!

Thine be the glory, risen, conqu'ring Son;
endless is the vict'ry Thou o’er death hast won.
Angels in bright raiment rolled the stone away,
kept the folded grave-clothes where Thy body lay.
Thine be the glory, risen, conqu'ring Son;
endless is the vict'ry Thou o’er death hast won.

Lo, Jesus meets us, risen from the tomb.
Lovingly He greets us, scatters fear and gloom;
let His church with gladness hymns of triumph sing,
for the Lord now liveth; death hath lost its sting.
Thine be the glory, risen, conqu'ring Son;
endless is the vict'ry Thou o’er death hast won.

No more we doubt Thee, glorious Prince of life!!
Life is nought without Thee; aid us in our strife;
make us more than conqu'rors, through Thy deathless love;
bring us safe through Jordan to Thy home above.
Thine be the glory, risen, conqu'ring Son;
endless is the vict'ry Thou o’er death hast won.[22]

Tune[edit]

The following setting, based on Handel's original, is from the collection "Complete Anglican Hymns Old and New".[23]


<< <<
\new Staff { \clef treble \time 4/4 \key d \major \set Staff.midiInstrument = "church organ" \set Score.tempoHideNote = ##t \override Score.BarNumber  #'transparent = ##t
  \relative c'' 
  << { a2 fis4. g8 | a2 d, | e8([ fis]) g([ a]) g4 fis | e1 |
  fis8([ g]) a([ b]) a4 a | d2 a | g4 fis8([ e ]) e4. d8 | d1 | \break
  fis8([ e]) fis([ g]) fis4 fis | e2 d | g4 fis e d | cis1 | 
  d8([ cis]) d([ e]) d4 d | b'2 gis | a4 b8([ a]) gis4. a8 | a1 \bar "||" | \break
  a2^\markup { Refrain } fis4. g8 | a2 d, | e8([ fis]) g([ a]) g4 fis | e1 |
  fis8([ g]) a([ b]) a4 a | d2 a | g4 fis8([ e ]) e4. d8 | d1|\bar"|." } \\
  { fis2 d4. cis8 | d2 d | cis8([ d]) e([ fis]) e4 d | cis1 |
  d4. d8 d4 e | a2 d, | cis4 d d cis | a1 |
  d8([ cis]) d([ e]) d4 d | cis2 b | e4 d cis b | ais1 |
  b8([ ais]) b([ cis]) b4 b | e2 d | cis4 fis e e | e1 |
  fis2 d4. cis8 | d2 d | cis8[ d] e[ fis] e4 d | cis1 |
  d4. d8 d4 <cis e> | <d a'>2 d | cis4 d2 cis4 | a1 } >>
}
\new Lyrics \lyricmode {
  Thine2 be4. the8 glo2 -- ry, ri4 -- sen, con -- qu'ring Son,1
  end4 -- less is the vic2 -- t'ry thou4 o'er death4. hast8 won;1
  an4 -- gels in bright rai2 -- ment rolled4 the stone a -- way,1
  kept4 the fold -- ed grave-2 -- clothes where4 thy bo -- dy lay.1
  \override Lyrics.LyricText.font-shape = #'italic
  Thine2 be4. the8 glo2 -- ry, ri4 -- sen, con -- qu'ring Son,1
  end4 -- less is the vic2 -- t'ry thou4 o'er death4. hast8 won.1
}
\new Staff { \clef bass \key d \major \set Staff.midiInstrument = "church organ"
  \relative c'
  << { d2 a4. g8 | fis2 a | g4 e a a | a1 |
  a4. g8 a4 cis | d2 fis, | g4 a a e | fis1 |
  a4 a a a | g2 fis | ais4 b g fis | fis1 |
  fis4 fis fis fis | b2 b | a4 d8([ cis]) b4. b8 | cis1 |
  d2 a4. g8 | fis2 a | g4 e a a | a1 |
  a4. g8 a4 e4 | fis2 fis | g4 a2 e4 | fis1 } \\
  { d2 fis4. e8 | d2 fis | e4. d8 cis4 d | a1 |
  d8([ e]) fis([ g]) fis4 a | fis2 d | e4 fis8([ g]) a4 a, | d1 |
  d4 d d fis, | a2 b | cis4 d e b | fis1 |
  b4 fis' b, a! | gis2 e' | fis4 d e e, | a1 | 
  d2 fis4. e8 | d2 fis | e4. d8 cis4 d | a1 |
  d8([ e]) fis([ g]) fis4 a, | fis2 d'4 d, | e fis8 g a4 a | <d d,>1 } >>
}
>> >>
\layout { indent = #0 #(layout-set-staff-size 16) }
\midi { \tempo 4 = 120 }

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Thine Is the Glory". www.hymntime.com. Archived from the original on 26 January 2020. Retrieved 6 April 2021.
  2. ^ King, Robert (1991). "Handel: Joshua". Hyperion Records. Hyperion Records/The King's Consort. Archived from the original on 6 April 2021. Retrieved 6 April 2021.
  3. ^ Lamott, Bruce (2016). "PROGRAM NOTES: Handel's Joshua". Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra & Chorale. Archived from the original on 6 April 2021. Retrieved 6 April 2021.
  4. ^ Lightwood, James T. (1935). "213. Maccabæus". The Music of the Methodist Hymnbook (. London: Epworth Press. p. 155.
  5. ^ a b "Judas Maccabaeus: Prom 8, 19th July 2012". Opera Britannia. 2012-07-21. Archived from the original on 2014-03-24. Retrieved 2014-03-24.
  6. ^ Temperley, Nicholas; Banfield, Stephen. Music and the Wesleys. University of Illinois Press. p. 15. ISBN 978-0-252-07767-8. Retrieved 6 April 2021.
  7. ^ Butts, Thomas (1754). "Christ, the Lord, is ris'n today". Harmonia Sacra, or a Compilation of Psalm and Hymn Tunes (1816 ed.). Andover: Flagg & gould. p. 118.
  8. ^ a b c Bradley, Ian. "135. Thine Be the Glory". Daily Telegraph Book of Hymns. Bloomsbury Academic. p. 460. ISBN 978-0-8264-8282-2.
  9. ^ a b c "Thine Be the Glory". The Center For Church Music. Retrieved 2014-03-24.
  10. ^ "Copyright". World Student Christian Federation. Archived from the original on December 8, 2013. Retrieved 2014-03-24.
  11. ^ a b Hawn. "History of Hymns: Easter celebration hymn transcends time, cultures". Discipleship Ministries. Archived from the original on 6 April 2021. Retrieved 6 April 2021.
  12. ^ "The New English Hymnal 120. Thine be the glory, risen conquering Son | Hymnary.org". hymnary.org. Retrieved 6 April 2021.
  13. ^ "Thine be the glory (StF 313)". www.methodist.org.uk. Retrieved 6 April 2021.
  14. ^ Scotland, The Church of. "Church Hymnary (4th Edition) Hymn 419: Thine be the glory, risen, conquering Son". The Church of Scotland. Retrieved 6 April 2021.
  15. ^ "Thine be the Glory". Worship Workshop. Retrieved 2014-03-24.
  16. ^ "Psalter Hymnal (Gray) 582. Praised be the Father". Hymnary.org. 1956-09-08. Retrieved 2014-03-24.
  17. ^ "Tochter Zion, freue dich". Mamalisa.com. Retrieved 2014-03-24.
  18. ^ "Dig være ære, Herre over dødens magt". Den Danske Salmebog (in Danish). Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  19. ^ "Royals gather for Easter service (From Gazette Series)". Gazetteseries.co.uk. 2012-04-08. Retrieved 2014-03-24.
  20. ^ "The Order of Service for the Family Service of Thanksgiving" (Press release). Buckingham Palace. Retrieved 2014-03-24.
  21. ^ Funeral Services of the Christian Churches in England: Including Additional Hymn Section. Canterbury Press. 2001. ISBN 1853113999.
  22. ^ "Thine Is the Glory". Hymnary.org. Retrieved 5 June 2018.
  23. ^ "Thine Be the Glory". hymnary.org. Complete Anglican Hymns Old and New. 2000. pp. 1114–1115.