Third-party and independent candidates for the 2020 United States presidential election

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Third-party and independent presidential candidates for the 2020 presidential election

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This article contains lists of official and potential third party and independent candidates associated with the 2020 United States presidential election.

"Third party" is a term commonly used in the United States in reference to political parties other than the two major parties, the Democratic Party and the Republican Party. An independent candidate is one who runs for office with no formal party affiliation.

Candidates[edit]

The following individuals have formally announced that they are running for the President of the United States in 2020 and/or have filed as a candidate for such with the Federal Election Commission (FEC).

Independent or unaffiliated[edit]

Declared candidates[edit]

Notable people who have announced that they are running for President in 2020 as independent candidates but have not established campaign websites are:

Withdrawn candidates[edit]

Libertarian Party[edit]

Declared candidates[edit]

Name Born Current or previous positions State Announced Ref
Kokesh2013.jpg
Adam Kokesh
February 1, 1982
(age 36)
San Francisco, California
Libertarian and anti-war political activist
Candidate for U.S. Representative from New Mexico in 2010
Flag of Arizona.svg
Arizona
July 18, 2013
(CampaignWebsite)
[4]
[5]
Lozwp DSC00677.jpg
Vermin Supreme
June 1961
(age 57)
Rockport, Massachusetts
Performance artist and activist
Candidate for President in 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, and 2016
Candidate for Mayor of Detroit, Michigan in 1989
Candidate for Mayor of Baltimore, Maryland in 1987
Flag of Maryland.svg
Maryland
May 28, 2018
Vermin Supreme A Dictator You Can Trust.jpg
(Website)
[6]
Arvin Vohra on The Tatiana Show.jpg
Arvin Vohra
May 9, 1979
(age 39)
Silver Spring, Maryland
Vice Chair of the LNC 2014–2018
Libertarian nominee for U.S. Senate from Maryland in 2018
Libertarian nominee for U.S. Representative in 2012 and 2014
Candidate for U.S. Senate in 2016
Flag of Maryland.svg
Maryland
July 3, 2018
(Website)
[7]

Withdrawn candidates[edit]

Party nomination contest[edit]

Potential candidates[edit]

The individuals listed below have been identified by reliable sources as potential 2020 presidential candidates. As of December 2018 they have done one or more of the following: expressed an intention to run, expressed an interest in running, and/or been the focus of media speculation in at least two reliable sources within the past six months. They are listed alphabetically by surname.

Constitution Party[edit]

Individuals who have publicly expressed interest[edit]

Individuals in this section have expressed an interest in running for President within the last six months.

Green Party[edit]

Individuals who have publicly expressed interest[edit]

Individuals in this section have expressed an interest in running for President within the last six months.

Potential candidates[edit]

Declined to run[edit]

The individuals in this section have been the subject of speculation about their possible candidacy, but have publicly denied interest in running.

Independent or unaffiliated[edit]

Individuals who have publicly expressed interest[edit]

Individuals in this section have expressed an interest in running for President within the last six months.


Declined to run[edit]

The individuals in this section have been the subject of speculation about their possible candidacy, but have publicly denied interest in running.

Libertarian Party[edit]

Potential candidates[edit]

Declined to run[edit]

The individuals in this section have been the subject of speculation about their possible candidacy, but have publicly denied interest in running.

Convention site[edit]

On December 10, 2017, the Libertarian National Committee chose Austin, Texas as the site of their 2020 national convention. The convention will be held between May 22–25, 2020.[63]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f This individual is not registered to the political party of this section, but has been the subject of speculation or expressed interest in running under this party.

References[edit]

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  3. ^ Gable, Jeremy (September 5, 2017). "FEC FORM 3P" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. Retrieved October 15, 2017.
  4. ^ "STATEMENT OF CANDIDACY :Adam Kokesh" (PDF). Docquery.fec.gov. Retrieved 20 December 2018.
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