Third party and independent candidates for the 2020 United States presidential election

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Third party and independent candidates for the 2020 United States presidential election

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This article lists third-party and independent candidates, also jointly known as minor candidates, associated with the 2020 United States presidential election.

"Third party" is a term commonly used in the United States in reference to political parties other than the Democratic and Republican parties. An independent candidate is one not affiliated with any political party.

The list of candidates whose names were printed on the ballot or who were accepted as write-in candidates varied by state. More than a hundred candidates were on the ballot or formally registered as write-in candidates in at least one state.[1]

All minor candidates combined received less than 2% of the national votes.[2]

Summary[edit]

Show/hide: [presidential candidates] [vice presidential candidates] [parties] [ballot access]

2020 United States presidential election results[2]
Presidential candidate Joe Biden Donald Trump Jo Jorgensen Howie Hawkins Rocky De La Fuente Gloria La Riva Kanye West
[a]
Don Blankenship Brock Pierce Brian Carroll
Vice presidential candidate Kamala Harris Mike Pence Spike Cohen Angela Walker Darcy Richardson
[a]
Sunil Freeman
[b]
Michelle Tidball William Mohr Karla Ballard Amar Patel
Party or label[c] Democratic
[d]
Republican
[e]
Libertarian Green[f] Alliance
[g]
PSL[h] Birthday Constitution
[i]
Independent
[j]
American Solidarity
EV access Ballot 538 538 538 381 183 195 84 165 115 66
Total 538 538 538 511 289 401 243 305 285 463
State/DC EV 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Others Total votes
Alabama[7] 9 849,624 1,441,170 25,176 [k] [k] [k] [k] [k] [k] [k] 7,312 2,323,282
Alaska[8] 3 153,778 189,951 8,897 [k] 318 [k] 1,127 825 [k] 4,634 359,530
Arizona[9] 11 1,672,143 1,661,686 51,465 1,557 190 285 3,387,326
Arkansas[10] 6 423,932 760,647 13,133 2,980 1,321 1,336 4,099 2,108 2,141 1,713 5,659 1,219,069
California[11] 55 11,110,250 6,006,429 187,895 81,029 60,160 51,037 [a] 185 2,605 1,291 17,500,881
Colorado[12] 9 1,804,352 1,364,607 52,460 8,986 636 1,035 8,089 5,061 572 2,515 8,667 3,256,980
Connecticut[13] 7 1,080,831 714,717 20,230 7,538 13 255 219 54 1,823,857
Delaware[14] 3 296,268 200,603 5,000 2,139 14 169 5 87 61 504,346
D. of Columbia[15] 3 317,323 18,586 2,036 1,726 855 693 3,137 344,356
Florida[16] 29 5,297,045 5,668,731 70,324 14,721 5,966 5,712 3,902 854 201 11,067,456
Georgia[17][l] 16 2,473,633 2,461,854 62,229 1,013 159 61 701 310 4,999,960
Hawaii[19] 4 366,130 196,864 5,539 3,822 931 1,183 574,469
Idaho[20] 4 287,021 554,119 16,404 407 1,491 49 3,632 1,886 2,808 163 34 868,014
Illinois[21] 20 3,471,915 2,446,891 66,544 30,494 8,046 18 9,548 288 6,033,744
Indiana[22] 11 1,242,416 1,729,519 59,232 989 895 70 3,033,121
Iowa[23] 6 759,061 897,672 19,637 3,075 1,082 [k] 3,210 1,707 544 [k] 4,883 1,690,871
Kansas[24] 6 570,323 771,406 30,574 669[m] 332[m] 4[m] 579[m] 99[m] 1,372,303
Kentucky[26] 8 772,474 1,326,646 26,234 716 98 6,483 3,599 408 110 2,136,768
Louisiana[27] 8 856,034 1,255,776 21,645 987 4,897 860 749 2,497 4,617 2,148,062
Maine[28] 4 435,072 360,737 14,152 8,230 1,183 87 819,461
Maryland[29] 10 1,985,023 976,414 33,488 15,799 26 125 1,117 16 795 24,227 3,037,030
Massachusetts[30] 11 2,382,202 1,167,202 47,013 18,658 164[n] 16,327 3,631,402
Michigan[31] 16 2,804,040 2,649,852 60,381 13,718 2,986 7,235 963 127 5,539,302
Minnesota[32] 10 1,717,077 1,484,065 34,976 10,033 5,611 1,210 7,940 75 5,651 1,037 9,496 3,277,171
Mississippi[33] 6 539,398 756,764 8,026 1,498 3,657 1,279 659 1,161 1,317 1,313,759
Missouri[34] 10 1,253,014 1,718,736 41,205 8,283 64 3,919 664 77 3,025,962
Montana[35] 3 244,786 343,602 15,252 34 603,674
Nebraska[36] 5 374,583 556,846 20,283 [k] [k] [k] [k] 4,671 956,383
Nevada[37] 6 703,486 669,890 14,783 3,138 14,079 1,405,376
New Hampshire[38] 4 424,937 365,660 13,236 217 [k] [k] 82 [k] [k] [k] 2,073 806,205
New Jersey[39] 14 2,608,335 1,883,274 31,677 14,202 2,728 2,928 909[o] 2,954 27[o] 330[o] 14,049[o] 4,549,353
New Mexico[41] 5 501,614 401,894 12,585 4,426 1,640 1,806 923,965
New York[42][p] 29 5,230,985 3,244,798 60,234 32,753 20 376 1,897 43 22,587 805 328 8,594,826
North Carolina[44] 15 2,684,292 2,758,775 48,678 12,195 7,549 13,315 5,524,804
North Dakota[45] 3 114,902 235,595 9,393 [k] [k] [k] 1,929 361,819
Ohio[46] 18 2,679,165 3,154,834 67,569 18,812 1,450 372 5,922,202
Oklahoma[47] 7 503,890 1,020,280 24,731 5,597 2,547 3,654 1,560,699
Oregon[48] 7 1,340,383 958,448 41,582 11,831 [k] [k] [k] [k] [k] [k] 22,077 2,374,321
Pennsylvania[49] 20 3,458,229 3,377,674 79,380 1,912[q] [r] [r] 632[q] [r] [r] 1,164[q] [r] 6,915,283
Rhode Island[50] 4 307,486 199,922 5,053 [k] 923 847 [k] [k] [k] 767 2,759 517,757
South Carolina[51] 9 1,091,541 1,385,103 27,916 6,907 1,862 2,513,329
South Dakota[52] 3 150,471 261,043 11,095 422,609
Tennessee[53] 11 1,143,711 1,852,475 29,877 4,545 1,860 2,301 10,279 5,365 762 2,676 3,053,851
Texas[54] 38 5,259,126 5,890,347 126,243 33,396 350 2,785[s] 2,809 11,315,056
Utah[56] 6 560,282 865,140 38,447 5,053 1,139 7,213 5,551 2,623 368 2,473 1,488,289
Vermont[57] 3 242,820 112,704 3,608 1,310 48 166 1,269 208 100 209 4,986 367,428
Virginia[58] 13 2,413,568 1,962,430 64,761 [k] [k] [k] [k] [k] 19,765 4,460,524
Washington[59] 12 2,369,612 1,584,651 80,500 18,289 [k] 4,840 [k] [k] [k] [k] 29,739 4,087,631
West Virginia[60] 5 235,984 545,382 10,687 2,599 0 9 25 5 40 794,731
Wisconsin[61] 10 1,630,866 1,610,184 38,491 1,089 110 411 5,146 5,259 6,485 3,298,041
Wyoming[62] 3 73,491 193,559 5,768 [k] [k] [k] [k] [k] 2,208 [k] 1,739 276,765
Total 538 81,268,924 74,216,154 1,865,724 405,035 88,234 85,623 70,296 60,148 49,700 39,230 234,335 158,383,403
Legend
Listed on ballot
Registered as write-in candidate
Write-in candidates allowed without registration
Not a candidate in the state/DC

Candidates who received more than 2,000 votes[edit]

The candidates below are listed in order of national vote totals.[2][w]

Jo Jorgensen, Libertarian Party[edit]

Libertarian candidate Jo Jorgensen was the only minor candidate to breach a million votes nationwide, getting more than 1% of the national votes and more than the margin between the two major candidates, Donald Trump and Joe Biden, in several battleground states.[64][65] She was also the only minor candidate who was on the ballot in every state.

Ballot access by state
  On ballot
2020 Libertarian Party ticket[66]
Jo Jorgensen Spike Cohen
for President for Vice President
Clemson University lecturer from South Carolina Podcaster and businessman from South Carolina
Campaign
Jorgensen Cohen 2020 Campaign Logo.svg
Other candidates for the Libertarian Party nomination
Jacob Hornberger Vermin Supreme John Monds Jim Gray Adam Kokesh Dan Behrman
Jacob Hornberger by Gage Skidmore (cropped) (3).jpg
Vermin Supreme August 2019 (cropped).jpg
Jim Gray (cropped).jpg
Kokesh2013 (cropped).jpg
Dan-taxation-is-theft-behrman (cropped) (2).jpg
Founder and President of the Future of Freedom Foundation Performance artist, activist, and political satirist Former President of the Grady County, Georgia NAACP Former presiding judge for the Superior Court of Orange County, California Libertarian and anti-war political activist Software engineer and podcaster
Jacob Hornberger 2020 campaign logo.png Vermin Supreme 2020 - Free Ponies For All - Campaign Logo.jpg N/A N/A N/A Dan Behrman 2020 campaign logo.png
N/A Campaign Campaign Campaign Campaign N/A
W: May 23, 2020
8,986 votes (20.55%)
236 first round delegates
W: May 23, 2020
4,288 votes (9.81%)
171 first round delegates
W: May 23, 2020
1 vote (<0.01%)
147 first round delegates
W: May 23, 2020
42 votes (0.10%)
98 first round delegates
W: May 23, 2020
2,728 votes (6.24%)
77 first round delegates
W: May 23, 2020
2,337 votes (5.34%)
0 first round delegates
[66] [66] [67] [68] [69] [70]
Sam Robb Justin Amash Ken Armstrong Lincoln Chafee Max Abramson Kim Ruff
Sam Robb Campaign Photo for 2020 Election (cropped).jpg
Justin Amash official photo (cropped).jpg
Ken Armstrong POTUS46 Headshot (cropped).jpg
Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee - 140526-N-PX557-166 (14290233225) (cropped).jpg
Max suit small (cropped).jpg
Kim Ruff (50280804772) (cropped).jpg
Software engineer and author
Former naval officer
U.S. representative from MI-03 (2011–present) U.S. Coast Guard
commissioned officer
(1977–1994)
Governor of Rhode Island (2011–2015) and U.S. Senator from Rhode Island (1999–2007) New Hampshire State Representative (2014–2016; 2018–present) Vice chair of the LPRadical Caucus
Sam Robb Campaign Logo for 2020 candidacy.png N/A N/A N/A Max Abramson 2020 logo.png RuffPhillips 2020 campaign logo.png
Campaign Campaign Campaign Campaign Campaign N/A
W: May 23, 2020
1,943 votes (5.06%)
0 first round delegates
W: May 17, 2020
3 votes (0.01%)
17 first round delegates
W: April 29, 2020
3,509 votes (8.03%)
0 first round delegates
W: April 5, 2020
294 votes (0.67%)
1 (write-in) first round delegate
W: March 3, 2020
2,052 votes (5.34%)
0 first round delegates
W: January 11, 2020
3,045 votes (7.93%)
0 first round delegates
[70] [71] [72] [73] [74] [75]

Howie Hawkins, Green Party[edit]

Ballot access by state[f]
  On ballot
  Write-in
2020 Green Party ticket[f][76][77]
Howie Hawkins Angela Walker
for President for Vice President
Co-founder of the Green Party from New York ATU Local 998 Legislative Director (2011–2013) from South Carolina
Campaign
Hawkins Walker logo wide.png
Additional party nominations: Legal Marijuana Now[ad][79]
Socialist Alternative[80][81]
Socialist Party USA[82]
Other candidates for the Green Party nomination
Dario Hunter
Officially recognized[ae]
Sedinam
Moyowasifza-Curry
Dennis Lambert Jesse Ventura David Rolde
Officially recognized[ae]
Dario Hunter headshot.jpg
SKCM Curry 2 (cropped).png
Dennis Lambert (1).jpg
JesseVentura1.jpg
David Rolde (Green Party US) (1).jpg
Member of the Youngstown Board of Education (2016–2020) Activist Documentary filmmaker Governor of Minnesota (1999–2003) Co-chair of the Greater Boston Chapter of the Green-Rainbow Party
Dario Hunter 2020 (1).png Sedinam 2020 Logo.png N/A N/A N/A
Campaign N/A N/A N/A N/A
89.5 delegates (20.1%)
3,087 votes
10.5 delegates (3.0%)
2,229 votes
9 delegates (2.6%)
2,029 votes
8 delegates (1.7%)
>49 votes
5.5 delegates (1.6%)
960 votes
[83] [84] [85] No candidacy [86]

Rocky De La Fuente, Alliance Party[edit]

Ballot access by state
  On ballot
  Write-in
2020 Alliance Party ticket[a][87]
Rocky De La Fuente Darcy Richardson
for President for Vice President
Rocky De La Fuente1 (2) (cropped).jpg LG PICs 2 002.JPG
Businessman and perennial candidate from California Author, historian and political activist from Florida
Campaign
Rocky De La Fuente 2020 presidential campaign logo.png
Additional party nominations: Reform Party
Natural Law Party of Michigan
American Independent Party
Other candidates for the Reform Party nomination
Max Abramson Johannon Ben Zion Phil Collins Souraya Faas
Max suit small.jpg
New Hampshire State Representative from the 20th Rockingham district Former 2020 presidential nominee of the Transhumanist Party from Arizona Former Libertyville Township Trustee and 2020 presidential nominee of the Prohibition Party from Nevada Former member of the Miami-Dade County Republican executive committee from Florida
Campaign Campaign
4 votes[88] 1 vote[88] 0 votes[88][89] Withdrew before convention
(endorsed De La Fuente)[88]

Gloria La Riva, Party for Socialism and Liberation[edit]

Ballot access by state
  On ballot
  Write-in
2020 Party for Socialism and Liberation ticket[b][90][91]
Gloria La Riva Sunil Freeman
for President for Vice President
Gloria La Riva at Trump inauguration protest SF Jan 20 2017.jpg Sunil freeman 0593.JPG
Activist and writer from California Author and activist from the District of Columbia
Campaign
Gloria La Riva logo.png
Additional party nominations: Liberty Union Party
Peace and Freedom Party

Kanye West, Birthday Party[edit]

Ballot access by state[a]
  On ballot
  Write-in
2020 Birthday Party ticket[a][92][93]
Kanye West Michelle Tidball
for President for Vice President
Kanye West at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival-2 (cropped).jpg
Rapper, producer and fashion designer from Wyoming Preacher from Wyoming
Campaign
Kanye 2020 Logo.png

Don Blankenship, Constitution Party[edit]

Ballot access by state[i]
  On ballot
  Write-in
2020 Constitution Party ticket[i][94]
Don Blankenship William Mohr
for President for Vice President
Former CEO of Massey Energy from West Virginia Chairman of the U.S. Taxpayers Party of Michigan from Michigan
Campaign
Don Blankenship 2020 presidential campaign logo.jpg
Candidates for the Constitution Party nomination
Don Blankenship Charles Kraut Don Grundman Samm Tittle Daniel Clyde Cummings J. R. Myers
Former CEO of Massey Energy from West Virginia Author from Virginia Chairman of the Constitution Party of California 2012 and 2016 independent presidential candidate from Texas Physician from Utah Former Alaska Constitution Party Chairman
Convention
139.5 votes (1st ballot)
177 votes (2nd ballot)
Popular Vote
639 votes
Convention
77.8 votes (1st ballot)
86.75 votes (2nd ballot)
Popular Vote
186 votes
Convention
25.25 votes (1st ballot)
24 votes (2nd ballot)
Popular Vote
256 votes
Convention
46.35 votes (1st ballot)
21.25 votes (2nd ballot)
Popular Vote
195 votes
Convention
13.1 votes (1st ballot)
Popular Vote
133 votes
Popular Vote
116 votes[af]

Brock Pierce, independent[edit]

Ballot access by state
  On ballot
  Write-in
Independent[95][96]
Brock Pierce Karla Ballard
for President for Vice President
Brock Pierce at the SingularityU The Netherlands Summit 2016 (29033319263) (cropped) (cropped).jpg
Director of the Bitcoin Foundation and former actor from Puerto Rico Entrepreneur from Pennsylvania
Brock Pierce Campaign Logo.png
Additional party nominations and ballot labels: American Shopping Party[97]
Independence Party of New York[98]
Freedom and Prosperity

Brian Carroll, American Solidarity Party[edit]

Ballot access by state
  On ballot
  Write-in
2020 American Solidarity Party ticket[99][100]
Brian T. Carroll Amar Patel
for President for Vice President
Brian T. Carroll - head shot .75 aspect ratio.png Amar Right Clean.jpg
Teacher from California Chairman of the American Solidarity Party from Illinois
Campaign
Carroll Patel 2020 Logo.svg
Other candidates for the American Solidarity Party nomination
Joe Schriner Joshua Perkins
Brian Carroll and Joe Schriner at the 2019 ASP Midwestern Regional Meeting (cropped).jpg
Plumber and activist from Ohio Programmer from Texas
Campaign
[101]

Jade Simmons, independent[edit]

Ballot access by state
  On ballot
  Write-in
Independent[t][102][103]
Jade Simmons Claudeliah J. Roze
for President for Vice President
Jade Simmons on campaign trail (cropped).jpg
Classical concert pianist from Texas Defense contractor from Texas
Additional ballot label: Becoming One Nation

Alyson Kennedy, Socialist Workers Party[edit]

Ballot access by state
  On ballot
  Write-in
2020 Socialist Workers Party ticket[104][105]
Alyson Kennedy Malcolm Jarrett
for President for Vice President
Mineworker and 2016 nominee from Texas Cook from Pennsylvania

Bill Hammons, Unity Party[edit]

Ballot access by state
  On ballot
  Write-in
2020 Unity Party ticket[106]
Bill Hammons Eric Bodenstab
for President for Vice President
Bill Hammons.jpg
Founder of the Unity Party from Texas Chairman of the Colorado Unity Party from Colorado
Campaign

Jerome Segal, Bread and Roses[edit]

Ballot access by state
  On ballot
  Write-in
2020 Bread and Roses ticket[107]
Jerome Segal John de Graaf
for President for Vice President
Philosopher from Maryland Documentary filmmaker and author from Washington
Campaign

Dario Hunter, Progressive Party[edit]

Ballot access by state
  On ballot
  Write-in
Dario Hunter
2020 Progressive Party ticket[108]
Dario Hunter Dawn Neptune Adams
for President for Vice President
Dario Hunter headshot.jpg Dawn Neptune Adams 402BDE5A.jpg
Youngstown Board of Education member (2016–2020) and 2020 Green candidate for President from Ohio Activist from Maine
Dario Hunter 2020 (1).png
Additional party nominations: Oregon Progressive Party[109]

Phil Collins, Prohibition Party[edit]

Ballot access by state
  On ballot
  Write-in
Prohibition Party
2020 Prohibition Party ticket[110]
Phil Collins Billy Joe Parker
for President for Vice President
Former Libertyville Township Trustee from Nevada Former Marine from Georgia
Campaign
Previous nominees of the Prohibition Party
First nominees[111]
Bill Bayes C. L. Gammon
for President for Vice President
2016 Vice Presidential nominee
from Mississippi
Historian from Tennessee
Bayes withdrew on March 21, 2019[112]
Second nominees[113]
C. L. Gammon Phil Collins
for President for Vice President
Historian from Tennessee Former Libertyville Township Trustee from Nevada
Gammon withdrew on August 2, 2019[114]

Jesse Ventura, Green Party of Alaska[edit]

Ballot access by state
  On ballot
  Write-in
2020 Green Party of Alaska ticket[f]
Jesse Ventura Cynthia McKinney
for President for Vice President
JesseVentura1.jpg
Cynthia McKinney.jpg
Governor of Minnesota (1999–2003) U.S. Representative from Georgia (1993–2003)

Mark Charles, independent[edit]

Ballot access by state
  On ballot
  Write-in
Independent[ag][116][117]
Mark Charles Adrian Wallace
for President for Vice President
Mark Charles 2019.jpg
Activist from the District of Columbia Community organizer and activist from Kentucky
Mark Charles campaign logo.png

Joe McHugh, independent[edit]

Ballot access by state
  On ballot
  Write-in
Independent[118]
Joe McHugh Elizabeth Storm
for President for Vice President
Marine veteran and entrepreneur from Michigan Attorney from Michigan

Other votes[edit]

A few states counted write-in votes for anyone, including people who did not declare themselves candidates and even non-human entities.[119][120] In Vermont, write-in preferences included well-regarded politicians, celebrities, fictional characters, deities and a type of cheese;[121] two votes were cast for Pete Budajude and one for Pete Burrigreg.[122]

In Nevada, the ballots included the option "none of these candidates", which received 14,079 votes.[37]

Debates[edit]

Withdrawn candidates[edit]

Declined[edit]

Individuals in this section were the subject of speculation that they might run for president as an independent or minor party candidate for the 2020 election but later said that they would not.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f In California, Kanye West was nominated by the American Independent Party as Rocky De La Fuente's vice presidential candidate, without either candidate's consent.[3]
  2. ^ a b The party's original vice presidential candidate was Leonard Peltier, who withdrew for health reasons[4] but remained listed in Illinois, Minnesota and Texas.
  3. ^ a b c In some states, some candidates were listed as independent or unaffiliated rather than their political party or label.
  4. ^ Also nominated by the Working Families Party in New York. Additional nomination by the Independent Party of Oregon was not listed on the ballot.[5]
  5. ^ Also nominated by the Conservative Party in New York.
  6. ^ a b c d e In Alaska, the Green Party nominated Jesse Ventura and Cynthia McKinney instead of the national candidates Howie Hawkins and Angela Walker, who then registered in that state as write-in candidates representing the Socialist Party USA. In Rhode Island, the Green Party refused to nominate a presidential candidate to the ballot.[6]
  7. ^ Nominated by the American Independent Party in California (with Kanye West for vice president), the Reform Party in Florida, and the Natural Law Party in Michigan.
  8. ^ Nominated by the Peace and Freedom Party in California, and the Liberty Union Party in Vermont.
  9. ^ a b c d e In New Mexico, the Constitution Party nominated Sheila "Samm" Tittle and David Carl Sandidge instead of the national candidates. In Alaska, Sheila "Samm" Tittle and John Wagner registered as a write-in candidates representing the Constitution Party in addition to the party's nomination of the national candidates to the ballot. In Arizona, where the Constitution Party did not have ballot access, Daniel Clyde Cummings and Ryan Huber registered as a write-in candidates representing the party instead of the national candidates.
  10. ^ Nominated by the American Shopping Party in Hawaii, and the Independence Party in New York. Registered with label Freedom and Prosperity in Louisiana.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co cp cq cr cs ct cu cv cw cx cy cz da db dc dd de df dg dh di dj dk dl dm dn do dp dq dr ds dt du dv dw dx dy dz ea eb ec ed ee ef eg eh ei ej ek el em en eo ep eq er es et eu ev ew ex ey ez fa fb fc fd fe ff fg fh fi fj fk fl fm fn fo fp fq May have received write-in votes, which were not reported individually and are included in others.
  12. ^ This table reflects the results certified by the state, which recorded fewer votes in Fulton County than those reported by the county.[18]
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Reported by a media source,[25] but not directly by the state or the Federal Election Commission. Not included in totals.
  14. ^ Unofficially compiled from results reported by local governments. Included in others.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Unofficially compiled from results reported by counties.[40] Not included in totals.
  16. ^ a b This table reflects the results certified by the state, which recorded fewer votes in Suffolk County than those reported by the county.[43]
  17. ^ a b c Unofficially compiled from results reported by counties. Not included in totals.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z May have received write-in votes, which were not reported by the state.
  19. ^ Result certified by the state, which did not include 422 write-in votes for this candidate reported by Harris County.[55]
  20. ^ a b In Florida, Melissa Nixon was listed as Jade Simmons's vice presidential candidate.
  21. ^ In Alaska, John Wagner was listed as Sheila "Samm" Tittle's vice presidential candidate.
  22. ^ a b The Prohibition Party previously nominated Connie L. Gammon for president and Phil Collins for vice president. After Connie L. Gammon withdrew, the party nominated Phil Collins for president and Billy Joe Parker for vice president. In Arkansas, both sets of candidates remained listed on the ballot.
  23. ^ a b c The results certified by Texas recorded 1,866 write-in votes for candidate President R19 Boddie in Bexar County,[54] while the county reported that number as the total of all write-in votes for president and no vote for that candidate.[63] These disputed votes are included in the numbers shown in the table in this article, but disconsidered for ordering the candidates and for inclusion in the main section.
  24. ^ a b c d Unofficially compiled from results reported by the state. Included in others.
  25. ^ In Vermont, Taja Yvonne Iwanow was listed as Kyle Kopitke's vice presidential candidate.
  26. ^ a b c Registered as write-in candidates representing the Republican Party in addition to the party's nomination of the national candidates to the ballot.
  27. ^ In Minnesota, James Edward McFadden was listed as Marcus Sykes's vice presidential candidate.
  28. ^ a b Karen M. Short was listed as Sharon Wallace's vice presidential candidate in Maryland, but they were listed as separate candidates in the District of Columbia.
  29. ^ a b c d Registered as write-in candidates representing the Democratic Party in addition to the party's nomination of the national candidates to the ballot.
  30. ^ The Legal Marijuana Now Party originally nominated Mark Elsworth and later Rudy Reyes for president but in August decided to nominate Hawkins.[78]
  31. ^ a b Official recognition by the Green Party is needed in order to receive its nomination.
  32. ^ Myers was only on the ballot in Idaho, and did not participate in the National Convention.
  33. ^ Adrian Wallace replaced original vice-presidential nominee Sedinam Moyowasifza-Curry, who was removed from the campaign for unknown reasons.[115]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Green Papers: 2020 General Election – Presidential Candidate Ballot Access by State – Sorted by On Ballot". The Green Papers. December 1, 2020. Retrieved December 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c d "Official 2020 presidential general election results" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. February 1, 2021. Retrieved February 6, 2021.
  3. ^ Column: Roque De La Fuente-Kanye West ticket in California is one for the ages, The San Diego Union-Tribune, October 21, 2020.
  4. ^ Winger, Richard (August 2, 2020). "Party for Socialism & Liberation Alters its Vice-Presidential Nominee". Ballot Access News. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  5. ^ Official ballot, Multnomah County, OR, November 3, 2020, Multnomah County Elections Division.
  6. ^ R.I. Green Party won't run a presidential candidate, Uprise RI, May 29, 2020.
  7. ^ a b c General Election Results November 3, 2020, Alabama Secretary of State.
    Section 17-6-27: Write-in votes; listing of independent candidates; form of ballots, Code of Alabama, Alabama Legislature.
  8. ^ a b c "Election Summary Report" (PDF). Alaska Division of Elections. Retrieved December 3, 2020.
    November 3, 2020 general election candidate list, Alaska Division of Elections, October 29, 2020.
  9. ^ a b c State of Arizona Official Canvass, Arizona Secretary of State.
  10. ^ a b "November 3, 2020 2020 General Election and Nonpartisan Judicial Runoff". Retrieved December 1, 2020.
  11. ^ a b c Statement of Vote, California Secretary of State.
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