Thomas E. Anderson

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Thomas E. Anderson
Born (1961-08-28) August 28, 1961 (age 55)
Orlando, Florida, US
Nationality American
Fields Computer science
Institutions University of Washington
University of California, Berkeley
Alma mater Harvard University
University of Washington
Doctoral advisor Edward D. Lazowska
Hank Levy
Doctoral students Margaret Martonosi
Amin Vahdat
Known for Distributed computing
networking
operating systems
Notable awards National Academy of Engineering (2016)
Website
www.cs.washington.edu/people/faculty/tom/

Thomas E. Anderson (born August 28, 1961) is an American computer scientist noted for his research on distributed computing, networking and operating systems.

Biography[edit]

Anderson received a B.A. in Philosophy from Harvard University in 1983. He received a M.S. in computer science from University of Washington in 1989 and a Ph.D in computer science from University of Washington in 1991.

He then joined the Department of Computer Science at the University of California, Berkeley as an assistant professor in 1991. While there he was promoted to associate professor in 1996. In 1997, he moved to the University of Washington as an associate professor. In 2001, he was promoted to professor, and in 2009 to the Robert E. Dinning Professor in Computer Science. He currently holds the Warren Francis and Wilma Kolm Bradley Endowed Chair.[1]

Awards[edit]

His notable awards include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Jennifer Langston (February 8, 2016). "UW's Tom Anderson elected to National Academy of Engineering". UW Today. University of Washington. Retrieved 18 January 2017. 
  2. ^ Ascribe Newswire Via Thomson Dialog NewsEdge (2006-01-10). "ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, Names 34 Fellows for Contributions to Computing and IT; Winners Represent Leading Industries, Research Labs, Universities". Cable Spotlight. Retrieved 2013-04-30. 
  3. ^ IEEE (2013). "IEEE Koji Kobayashi Computers and Communications Award Recipients". IEEE. Retrieved 2013-04-30. 

External links[edit]