Thomas Houseago

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Thomas Houseago
Education
Known forsculpture, painting

Thomas Houseago is a British contemporary artist. He lives in Los Angeles, California, and also has American citizenship.[1][2] Much of his work has been figurative sculpture, often on a large scale, in plaster, bronze or aluminium; his large plaster Baby was included in the Whitney Biennial in 2010. He has also made architectural installations.[3]

Life and career[edit]

Houseago grew up in Leeds in West Yorkshire, where his mother was a teacher.[2] He did his foundation year at Jacob Kramer College in Leeds, and in 1991 went to Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London.[3][4][5] He then studied at De Ateliers in Amsterdam, where he came into contact with figurative artists such as Marlene Dumas, Thomas Schütte and Luc Tuymans.[4] He lived for eight years in Brussels before moving to Los Angeles in 2003.[4][6][5] In the Frogtown district of Los Angeles, his studio complex occupies four single-story industrial buildings along the Los Angeles River.[7]

Donald and Mera Rubell, art collectors from Miami, bought several of his works in 2006.[6] His large plaster Baby was included in the Whitney Biennial in 2010,[3] and in 2011 L'Homme Pressé, a tall bronze figure of a walking man, was installed in front of Palazzo Grassi on the Grand Canal in Venice during the Biennale.[8][9]

Art market[edit]

Early in his career, Houseago maintained a relationship with Xavier Hufkens Gallery in Brussels and soon began showing with Michael Werner Gallery in New York.[10] From 2009, he was represented by David Kordansky,[11][12][13] Today he is represented by Gagosian Gallery and Hauser & Wirth.[14]

Personal life[edit]

During his time at De Ateliers, Houseago met the American painter Amy Bessone with whom he lived until 2013. Since then he has been in a relationship with art therapist Muna El Fituri.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Suzanne Muchnic (March 15, 2017), Over the Wall: Thomas Houseago's Latest Works Engage Builders, Breakers, and Climbers. ARTNews.
  2. ^ a b Kelly Crow (December 7, 2012). Searching for the Next Art-World Star. Wall Street Journal. Archived December 24, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c Ted Loos (November 6, 2014). Leaving the Monsters Behind: Thomas Houseago’s Long Road to 'Moun Room'. New York Times.
  4. ^ a b c Jonathan Griffin (August 17, 2012). Thomas Houseago’s sacred monsters. Financial Times. Archived August 19, 2016.
  5. ^ a b Susan Morgan (January 31, 2018). Gagosian Inside the Healing L.A. Studio of Artist Thomas Houseago, Where Ghosts (and Brad Pitt) Roam. W Magazine.
  6. ^ a b Jori Finkel (January 2, 2011). Sculptor Thomas Houseago's shape-shifting world. Los Angeles Times.
  7. ^ Susan Morgan (January 31, 2018), Inside the Healing L.A. Studio of Artist Thomas Houseago, Where Ghosts (and Brad Pitt) Roam W.
  8. ^ Jori Finkel (June 2, 2011). Notes from the Venice Biennale: Thomas Houseago's can't-be-missed sculpture at Palazzo Grassi. Los Angeles Times.
  9. ^ John Batten (July 9, 2016). Gagosian Hong Kong shows first paintings of much collected sculptor Thomas Houseago. Hong Kong: Post Magazine.
  10. ^ Jori Finkel (January 2, 2011), Sculptor Thomas Houseago's shape-shifting world Los Angeles Times.
  11. ^ Jonathan Griffin (August 17, 2012), Thomas Houseago’s sacred monsters Financial Times.
  12. ^ Jonathan Griffin (September 10, 2014), The New Dealer New York Times.
  13. ^ Ted Loos (November 6, 2014), Leaving the Monsters Behind: Thomas Houseago’s Long Road to ‘Moun Room’ New York Times.
  14. ^ Ted Loos (November 6, 2014), Leaving the Monsters Behind: Thomas Houseago’s Long Road to ‘Moun Room’ New York Times.
  15. ^ Susan Morgan (January 31, 2018), Inside the Healing L.A. Studio of Artist Thomas Houseago, Where Ghosts (and Brad Pitt) Roam W.