Thomas Hoy (botanist)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Thomas Hoy (c.1750 – 1 May 1822) was an English gardener and botanist employed by the Duke of Northumberland at Syon House in Middlesex in the United Kingdom, a position he held for 40 years.[1][2] Described as "an experienced botanist and able cultivator" he became a fellow of the Linnean Society of London in 1788 and presented a number of flowering plants to the society from which several species were first formally described including the Australian plants Acacia suaveolens, Acacia myrtifolia and Goodenia ovata.[1][3][4][5]

He died in Isleworth in 1822 aged 72.[1][2] Botanist Robert Brown named the plant genus Hoya in his honour describing Hoy as someone "whose merits as an intelligent and successful cultivator have been long known to the botanists of this country".[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Desmond, Ray (2002). Dictionary of British and Irish botanists and horticulturists. CRC Press. ISBN 978-0-85066-843-8. Retrieved 2009-09-27.
  2. ^ a b "Belle assemblée". Epitaths on Servants. J.Bell. 3. 1826. Retrieved 2009-09-27.
  3. ^ "Goodenia ovata". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government, Canberra. Retrieved 2009-09-27.
  4. ^ "Mimosa myrtifolia". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government, Canberra. Retrieved 2009-09-25.
  5. ^ "Mimosa suaveolens". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government, Canberra. Retrieved 2009-09-22.
  6. ^ Brown, Robert (1810). On the Asclepiadeae.