Thomas J. McCormick

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Thomas J. McCormick is an emeritus professor of history at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, the same place he got a Ph. D.[1] where he succeeded William Appleman Williams and continued the groundbreaking work of the so-called Wisconsin School of diplomatic history. Indeed he is considered one of the core members of the Wisconsin School, along with Williams, Walter LaFeber, and Lloyd Gardner.[2][3] He has used Immanuel Wallerstein's world-systems approach to describe the dynamics of hegemony in US diplomatic history[4] and also studied US corporatism[5].

McCormick taught at the Ohio University, University of Pittsburgh, and University of Wisconsin–Madison where he won the Wisconsin Student Association Award for Teaching Excellence (1992-1993). He was a Woodrow Wilson Center Fellow (1981), Distinguished Fulbright Lecturer at University College Dublin (1993-1994), and Vilas Associate (1996-1998). McCormick authored six books (see Works) and many influential articles[6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15]. He often gave US guest lectures[16][17][18][19] as well as several keynote addresses at worldwide conferences[20][21][22][23].

Works[edit]

  • China Market: America's Quest for Informal Empire, 1893-1901. Chicago, IL: Quadrangle Books, 1967.
  • Creation of the American Empire: U.S. Diplomatic History. With Lloyd C. Gardner and Walter F. LaFeber. New York: Rand McNally & Co., 1973.
  • America in Vietnam. With William A. Williams and Walter F. LaFeber. New York: Anchor Doubleday, 1988.
  • America's Half-Century: United States Foreign Policy in the Cold War. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1990, revised second edition 1995.
  • The Vietnam War: Four American Perspectives . With William Westmorland, George McGovern, and Edward Luttwack. Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press, 1990.
  • Behind the Throne: Servants of Power to Imperial Presidents, 1898-1968. With Walter F. LaFeber (eds.) Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 1994.

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "History Department Emeriti/Emeritae". Archived from the original on 8 December 2010. Retrieved 24 May 2011.
  2. ^ Crapol, Edward (February 1987). "Some Reflections on the Historiography of the Cold War". The History Teacher. 20 (2): 251–262. doi:10.2307/493031. JSTOR 493031.
  3. ^ Morgan, James G. (2014). Into New Territory: American Historians and the Concept of American Imperialism. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press. p. 172.
  4. ^ Gale, Thomas. "Encyclopedia of Western Colonialism since 1450". Modern World-System Analysis. Retrieved 30 August 2019.
  5. ^ Williams, William A. (1961). The Contours of American History. W. W. Norton Company. ISBN 9780393305616.
  6. ^ McCormick, Thomas (1963). "Insular Imperialism and the Open Door: The China Market and the Spanish-American War". Pacific Historical Review.
  7. ^ McCormick, Thomas (1971). "The State of American Diplomatic History". The State of American History.
  8. ^ McCormick, Thomas (1972). "Exporting the Social Question". New Perspectives in American History.
  9. ^ McCormick, Thomas (1982). "Drift or Mastery? The Corporatist Synthesis in American Diplomatic History". The Promise of American History.
  10. ^ McCormick, Thomas (1978). "Every System Needs A Center Sometime--An Essay on Hegemony and Modern American Foreign Policy". Redefining the Past.
  11. ^ McCormick, Thomas (1991). "Systemic Explanations". Explaining the History of American Foreign Relations.
  12. ^ McCormick, Thomas (1992). "The 1890s as Watershed Decade". Safeguarding the Republic, 1890-1990.
  13. ^ McCormick, Thomas (1993). "Walking the Tightrope: Adolf A. Berle, Jr. and America's Journey from Social to Global Capitalism, 1933-1945". Behind the Throne: Servants of Power to Imperial Presidents, 1898-1968.
  14. ^ McCormick, Thomas (1994). "Creating the New Co-Prosperity Sphere: The United States, Japan and Asia, 1945-1954". Bulletin of Asian Studies. IV.
  15. ^ McCormick, Thomas (2005). "American Hegemony and European Autonomy, 1989-2003: One Framework for Understanding the War in Iraq". The New American Empire.
  16. ^ McCormick, Thomas (1988). "American Hegemony and the Roots of the Vietnam War". Louis B. Sears Lectures.
  17. ^ McCormick, Thomas (1962). "The Spanish-American War and American China Policy". Association of Asian Studies.
  18. ^ McCormick, Thomas (1969). "The State of American Diplomatic History". Organization of American Historians.
  19. ^ McCormick, Thomas (1981). "Social History, Corporatism, and American Diplomatic History". Woodrow Wilson Center.
  20. ^ McCormick, Thomas (1983). "The Corporatist Synthesis in American Diplomatic History". Japanese Association of American Studies. Kyoto, Japan.
  21. ^ McCormick, Thomas (1993). "Glancing Backward, Looking Forward: A Retrospective on the World-System and its Prospects for the Next Quarter-Century". Japan Foundation's Center for Global Partnership and the American Center. Osaka, Japan.
  22. ^ McCormick, Thomas (1996). "The Promise and Perils of American Hegemony". French Association of American Studies. Lyon, France.
  23. ^ McCormick, Thomas (2000). "Modern Hegemony and the Rhythms of History". Japanese Association of Western History. Osaka, Japan.

Further reading[edit]

  • James G. Morgan, Into New Territory: American Historians and the Concept of American Imperialism. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 2014.