Thomas Lyttelton, 2nd Baron Lyttelton

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Lord Lyttelton, portrait by Richard Brompton.
St John the Baptist Church, Hagley, memorial to Thomas Lyttelton, 2nd Baron Lyttelton (1744–1779)

Thomas Lyttelton, 2nd Baron Lyttelton[1] (30 January 1744 – 27 November 1779) was an English MP and profligate from the Lyttelton family. Sometimes dubbed the nicknames "the wicked Lord Lyttelton"[2] and "bad Lord Lyttelton" to discredit his independence from the political parties and religious dogmas of his era, he was the son of George Lyttelton and Lucy Fortescue. His mother died when he was two years old. He was very talented in his early years, particularly in drawing. Educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford,[3] he was also a reader of poetry, his favourite poet being John Milton. His father, Lord Lyttelton held several privileged positions in society, such as privy councillor, a Lord of the Treasury and Chancellor of the Exchequer. He was also a good friend of the Prince of Wales, who later became King George III. Lyttelton received his pension through his estranged father, and because of his parentage and outstanding ability he also held privileged positions in society. He was a Whig MP for Bewdley from 1768 to 1769 and the Chief Justice of the Eyre in 1775, and became a privy councillor the same year.

He married Aphia Witts, but they had no children, so on his death the barony he held became extinct. It was recreated later, however. His death was widely reported to have been foreseen by Lyttelton three days prior; he claimed a bird flew into his room, and told him he had three days to live.

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The spelling is occasionally Lyttleton, as in the collected Letters of the Late Lord Lyttleton, Troy, N. Y.: Wright, Goodenow & Stockwell, 1807.
  2. ^ THE LIFE OF THOMAS LORD LYTTELTON, by Thomas Frost. 1876.
  3. ^ "Alumni oxonienses: the members of the University of Oxford, 1715-1886, vol.3". 
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Sir Edward Winnington, Bt
Member of Parliament for Bewdley
1768–1769
Succeeded by
Sir Edward Winnington, Bt
Legal offices
Preceded by
Thomas Pelham,
2nd Baron Pelham of Stanmer
Justice in Eyre
north of the Trent

1775–1779
Succeeded by
Charles Wolfran Cornwall
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
George Lyttelton
Baron Lyttelton
1773–1779
Succeeded by
(extinct)
Baronetage of England
Preceded by
George Lyttelton
Baronet
(of Frankley)
1773–1779
Succeeded by
William Henry Lyttelton,
1st Baron Westcote
Created Baron Lyttelton (1794)