Thomas Rytter

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Thomas Rytter
Personal information
Full name Thomas Rytter Jakobsen
Date of birth (1974-01-06) 6 January 1974 (age 43)
Place of birth Copenhagen, Denmark
Height 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)
Playing position Right back
Club information
Current team
Blovstrød IF (Manager)
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1992–1996 Lyngby 129 (1)
1996–1998 Sevilla 34 (1)
1998–2001 FCK 95 (3)
2001–2005 VfL Wolfsburg 87 (1)
2005–2008 Brøndby 49 (0)
Total 394 (6)
National team
1992–1993 Denmark U19 5 (0)
1993–1996 Denmark U21 22 (0)
1996–2003 Denmark 4 (0)
Teams managed
2009–2010 Frederiksværk FK (assistant)
2010–2011 Frederiksværk FK
2011–2014 Virum Sorgenfri
2014–2015 Frederiksværk FK[1]
2015– Blovstrød IF[2]
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Thomas Rytter Jakobsen (born 6 January 1974) is a retired Danish footballer and manager, who played as a right-back.[3] He is currently the manager of Blovstrød IF.

In 2001, he won the Danish Superliga championship with F.C. Copenhagen, and most prominently played for Spanish club Sevilla and German club Wolfsburg. Rytter was named 1994 Danish under-21 Talent of the Year, and he played four matches for the Danish national team between 1996 and 2003.

Career[edit]

Early career[edit]

Born in Copenhagen, Rytter started his career at Lyngby Boldklub. He made his senior debut for the club in 1992, 18 years old, and immediately secured himself a place in the Lyngby first team squad. Rytter was one of several promising young Lyngby players, including later Danish internationals Dennis Rommedahl and Niclas Jensen, and he was called up for the Danish under-19 national team in October 1992. He went on to play 22 matches for the Danish under-21 national team from 1993 to 1996, and won the 1994 Danish under-21 Talent of the Year award.

Sevilla[edit]

Rytter was called up for Danish national team coach Bo Johansson's debut game, and got his international debut in the 1–0 win against Sweden on 14 August 1996. After five seasons at Lyngby, Rytter left the club in the winter 1996. He was sold by Lyngby CEO Flemming Østergaard to Spanish club Sevilla FC in the La Liga championship. Rytter made his debut for Sevilla in December 1996. In his first year at the club, Sevilla were relegated to the Segunda División. Rytter played the first half of the next season for Sevilla, before moving back to Denmark in January 1998.

Return to Denmark[edit]

Bought by F.C. Copenhagen (FCK) CEO Flemming Østergaard, Rytter made his FCK debut in March 1998. At FCK, he was reunited with former Lyngby teammate Niclas Jensen, and the two formed a wingback duo that was known as the best in the Superliga. Rytter was a part of the FCK team which won the 2001 Superliga trophy, and was once again called up for the Danish national team, by new national coach Morten Olsen. He played his second national team game in November 2001.

Wolfsburg[edit]

His contract with FCK was set to run out in the summer 2002, and in the winter 2001, Rytter and FCK failed to agree on a contract extension. He was initially benched, but was eventually sold to Fußball-Bundesliga club VfL Wolfsburg in December 2001.

Retirement at Brøndby[edit]

He played three and a half seasons at Wolfsburg, and was twice called up for the Danish national team by Morten Olsen. In July 2005, he moved back to Denmark to Brøndby IF, the main rivals of his former club FCK. This caused controversy in FCK, where Flemming Østergaard concluded that all footballers are egoists as Thomas was like a son to him. Thomas Rytter replied "I already have a father, and his name is Frank". In his first season at Brøndby, injuries reduced his playing time. On 25 August 2008 he retired from professional football.

Honours[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Thomas Rytter vender tilbage til FFK". ffk-fodbold.dk. Retrieved 20 December 2014. 
  2. ^ "Thomas Max Hansen og Thomas Rytter ny trænerduo". blovstrod-if.dk. Retrieved 28 November 2015. 
  3. ^ "Thomas Rytter". worldfootball.net. Retrieved 12 May 2013. 

External links[edit]