Thomas Waugh

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Thomas Waugh
Born 1948 (age 69–70)
London, Ontario
Occupation Academic, Author, Critic, Programmer, Activist
Nationality Canadian
Period 1970s-present
Notable works

Show Us Life: Towards a History and Aesthetics of the Committed Documentary

Hard to Imagine: Gay Male Eroticism in Photography and Film from Their Beginnings to Stonewall

The Romance of Transgression in Canada: Queering Sexualities, Nations, Cinemas

Thomas Waugh is a Canadian critic, programmer, lecturer, author, actor, and activist,[1] best known for his extensive work on documentary film and eroticism in the history of LGBT cinema and art.[1] A professor at Concordia University,[2] he teaches in the department of film studies and holds a research chair in documentary film and sexual representation.

A graduate of Columbia University, he wrote film criticism and history articles for publications such as Jump Cut and The Body Politic before publishing his first book, Show Us Life: Towards a History and Aesthetics of the Committed Documentary, in 1984.

His 1996 book, Hard to Imagine: Gay Male Eroticism in Photography and Film from Their Beginnings to Stonewall, took 13 years to research and write.[3] Its release was delayed eight full months after its initial planned publication date, due to difficulty finding a printer willing to handle the book's sexually explicit homoerotic imagery.[4]

He is a two-time Lambda Literary Award nominee, garnering nominations in the Visual Arts category at the 15th Lambda Literary Awards in 2003 for Out/Lines: Underground Gay Graphics From Before Stonewall,[5] and at the 17th Lambda Literary Awards in 2005 for Lust Unearthed: Vintage Gay Graphics from the DuBek Collection.[6]

Waugh has also served on the board of Cinema Politica,[7] has been active with the Quebec Gay Archives,[8] and is coeditor with Matthew Hays of the Queer Film Classics series of monographs on LGBT film, published by Arsenal Pulp Press.[9] In 2013 Waugh, Ryan Conrad and Cinema Politica raised funds on Indiegogo to produce and distribute a documentary film about the Russian LGBT organization Children-404.[10]

In 2015, Waugh and filmmaker Kim Simard launched the Queer Media Database, an online project to collect and publish information about LGBT films made in Canada and the personalities involved in their creation.[11] The project was based in part on his 2006 book The Romance of Transgression in Canada: Queering Sexualities, Nations, Cinemas.

Works[edit]

  • Show Us Life: Towards a History and Aesthetics of the Committed Documentary (1984)
  • Hard to Imagine: Gay Male Eroticism in Photography and Film from Their Beginnings to Stonewall (1996)
  • The Fruit Machine: Twenty Years of Writings on Queer Cinema (2000)
  • Out/Lines: Underground Gay Graphics From Before Stonewall (2002)
  • Lust Unearthed: Vintage Gay Graphics from the DuBek Collection (2004)
  • The Romance of Transgression in Canada: Queering Sexualities, Nations, Cinemas (2006)
  • Gay Art: A Historic Collection (2006)
  • Comin' At Ya! The Homoerotic 3-D Photographs of Denny Denfield (2007, with David L. Chapman)
  • Montreal Main (2010, with Jason Garrison)
  • Challenge for Change: Activist Documentary at the National Film Board of Canada (2010, with Michael Baker and Ezra Winton)
  • The Right to Play Oneself: Looking Back on Documentary Film (2011)
  • The Perils of Pedagogy: The Works of John Greyson (2013, with Brenda Longfellow and Scott MacKenzie)
  • The Conscience of Cinema: The Works of Joris Ivens, 1912-1989 (2016)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Daniel Allen Cox, "Naked Lunch: An interview with Thomas Waugh". Xtra!, January 5, 2010.
  2. ^ "Filling the void of LGBT cultural amnesia; Concordia profs at the helm of book series revisiting 21 influential movies". Montreal Gazette, January 25, 2012.
  3. ^ "Behind shocking gay photos, this is a serious study". Edmonton Journal, November 30, 1996.
  4. ^ "Gay history fit to print: Book slated for sale by early November". The Globe and Mail, September 26, 1996.
  5. ^ "15th Lambda Literary Awards". Lambda Literary Foundation, July 9, 2003.
  6. ^ "17th Lambda Literary Awards". Lambda Literary Foundation, July 9, 2005.
  7. ^ "Cinema should encourage debate". National Post, March 19, 2010.
  8. ^ "Making things perfectly queer". Concordia News, March 1, 2013.
  9. ^ "Queer Film Classics Film Book Series ed. by Thomas Waugh, Matthew Hays (review)". Journal of Film and Video (Volume 66, Number 2), Summer 2014. pp. 48-50.
  10. ^ "Russian film about LGBTQ youth seeks funds". Windy City Times, November 5, 2013.
  11. ^ "Online database of queer Canadian movies launching at Toronto Pride". The Globe and Mail, June 24, 2015.

External links[edit]