Thorganby, Lincolnshire

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Thorganby
All Saints, Thorganby - geograph.org.uk - 105728.jpg
All Saints' Church, Thorganby
Thorganby is located in Lincolnshire
Thorganby
Thorganby
Location within Lincolnshire
OS grid referenceTF209976
• London140 mi (230 km) S
District
Shire county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townGRIMSBY
Postcode districtDN37
PoliceLincolnshire
FireLincolnshire
AmbulanceEast Midlands
EU ParliamentEast Midlands
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Lincolnshire
53°27′41″N 0°10′49″W / 53.461445°N 0.180309°W / 53.461445; -0.180309Coordinates: 53°27′41″N 0°10′49″W / 53.461445°N 0.180309°W / 53.461445; -0.180309

Thorganby is a village and civil parish in the West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire. England. It is situated approximately 9 miles (14 km) north-east from the town of Market Rasen in the Lincolnshire Wolds, a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The population is included in the civil parish of Swinhope.

The parish church is a Grade II listed building dedicated to All Saints. Built using ironstone, limestone and red brick, It dates from the 13th century although it was almost completely rebuilt in 1900. It retains its 13th-century font.[1]

Thorganby Hall is a Grade II listed small country house, built of limestone and red brick in 1648 with early 19th-century additions.[2] It was built to replace an earlier Hall which was the seat of the Willoughby family, plundered by the Roundheads during the English Civil War in 1643.[3]

Thorganby C of E School was built in 1868 as a National School. It closed in March 1959.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Historic England. "All Saints, Thorganby (1063481)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 16 August 2011.
  2. ^ Historic England. "Thorganby Hall (1359758)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 16 August 2011.
  3. ^ Historic England. "Old Hall, Thorganby (353282)". PastScape. Retrieved 16 August 2011.
  4. ^ "Thorganby CE School". Lincs to the Past. Lincolnshire Archives. Retrieved 16 August 2011.

External links[edit]