Those Were the Days!

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Those Were the Days!
Directed by Theodore Reed
Produced by Theodore Reed
William LeBaron
Written by Don Hartman
George Fitch
Starring William Holden
Bonita Granville
Music by Victor Young
Cinematography Victor Milner
Edited by William Shea
Production
company
Paramount
Release dates
July 14 1940
Running time
74 Minute
Country United States
Language English

Those Were the Days! is a 1940 film comedy starring William Holden and Bonita Granville.[1]

The cast also featured young Judith Barrett, who made a decision to retire from acting after this.

Plot[edit]

On their 35th wedding anniversary, we hear the story of how the couple met in college.

P. J. "Petey" Simmons is a wealthy newcomer, so rival fraternities fight over him. His ego swells as frat boys and comely co-eds alike bide for his time. Petey keeps getting into trouble, too, including an arrest.

At a school dance, Petey's shy roommate has worked up the nerve to invite campus beauty Mirabel Allstairs to be his date. The increasingly arrogant Petey ignores his own date, Martha Scroggs, dancing with other girls instead.

Petey pulls pranks on campus, going so far as to change a professor's clocks to delay an exam. A later act of vandalism leads to yet another arrest. This time the judge threatens to throw the book at Petey, sentencing him to six months in jail. Petey asks for a week's continuance before sentencing, then uses the time to court Martha, having discovered her to be the daughter of the judge.

Once his scheme is revealed, Petey is locked in the town jail by the angry judge. Martha is smitten with him now, however, throws a rock to get arrested so she can end up in the next cell, holding hands with Petey between the bars.

Back in the present, the old judge still can't believe how his daughter and son-in-law ended up together. They also hear that Petey Jr. has just been placed under arrest, which doesn't surprise the judge a bit.

Cast[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Those Were the Days at New York Times

External links[edit]