Thousand Springs State Park

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Thousand Springs State Park
Idaho State Park
Thousand Springs 2016-10-13 2361.jpg
Country United States
State Idaho
County Gooding
Location Hagerman
 - elevation 2,800 ft (853 m) [1]
 - coordinates 42°51′28″N 114°52′35″W / 42.85778°N 114.87639°W / 42.85778; -114.87639Coordinates: 42°51′28″N 114°52′35″W / 42.85778°N 114.87639°W / 42.85778; -114.87639
Area 2,000 acres (809 ha) [1]
Established 2005
Management Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation
IUCN category V - Protected Landscape/Seascape
Location in Idaho
Website: Thousand Springs State Park

Thousand Springs State Park is a state park of Idaho, USA, consisting of five units in the Hagerman Valley. In 2005 as part of a master planning process, it was decided to combine four existing state parks under a single new entity.[2] A fifth unit has since been added. The units as they currently stand are Billingsley Creek, Earl M. Hardy Box Canyon Springs Nature Preserve, Malad Gorge, Niagara Springs, and Ritter Island.[1]

Park units[edit]

Billingsley Creek

This former ranch was purchased by the state in 2001.[1] One feature is the homesite of western author Vardis Fisher.[2] Billingsley Creek Unit totals 286 acres (116 ha).[3]

Earl M. Hardy Box Canyon Springs Nature Preserve

This 350-acre (140 ha) box canyon has 250-foot-high (76 m) walls. At its head is the eleventh-largest spring in North America, gushing 180,000 US gallons (680,000 L) per minute.[3] There is a 20-foot (6.1 m) waterfall.[1] This 350-acre (140 ha) property was developed by the Nature Conservancy which purchased the site in 1999, then completed its transfer to the state in 2006.[4]

Malad Gorge on the Snake River
Malad Gorge

Malad Gorge is a 250-foot-deep (76 m) canyon formed by the Malad River, downstream from a 60-foot (18 m) waterfall. This 652-acre (264 ha) day-use-only unit is just off Interstate 84 and offers hiking and picnicking. A section of the Oregon Trail is visible.[1] Rock pigeons, red-tailed hawks and golden eagles nest in the canyon. Yellow-bellied marmots are found on the canyon floor.

Niagara Springs

Proclaimed a National Natural Landmark, this area borders the Snake River and features sheer basalt cliffs 350 feet (110 m) high.[3] There are 179 acres (72 ha) in two parcels, acquired in 1971 and 1976.[3]

Ritter Island

This unit lies along the Snake River between two large springs.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Thousand Springs State Park". Idaho Parks and Recreation. Retrieved October 23, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "Thousand Springs State Park Master Plan, Chapter 1" (PDF). Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation. August 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2009-05-07. Retrieved 2001-03-04. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Thousand Springs State Park Master Plan, Chapter 3" (PDF). Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation. August 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2009-05-07. Retrieved 2001-03-04. 
  4. ^ "Waterfalls and Caribbean blue springs in the Idaho desert". The Nature Conservancy. Retrieved October 23, 2017. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Lamb, M. P.; Dietrich, W. E.; Aciego, S. M.; Depaolo, D. J.; Manga, M. (2008). "Formation of Box Canyon, Idaho, by Megaflood: Implications for Seepage Erosion on Earth and Mars". Science. 320 (5879): 1067–70. doi:10.1126/science.1156630. PMID 18497296. 

External links[edit]