Threat

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For other uses, see Threat (disambiguation).
Threats can be subtle or overt. Actor Justus D. Barnes, in The Great Train Robbery

A threat is a communicated intent to inflict harm or loss on another person.[1][2] A threat is considered an act of coercion. Threats (intimidation) are widely observed in animal behavior, particularly in a ritualized form, chiefly in order to avoid the unnecessary physical violence that can lead to physical damage or death of both conflicting parties.[citation needed]

Some of the more common types of threats forbidden by law are those made with an intent to obtain a monetary advantage or to compel a person to act against his or her will. In all US states, it is an offense to threaten to (1) use a deadly weapon on another person; (2) injure another's person or property; or (3) injure another's reputation.[3]

Brazil[edit]

In Brazil, the crime of threatening someone, defined as a threat to cause unjust and grave harm, is punishable by a fine or three months to one year in prison, as described in the Brazilian Penal Code, article 147. Brazilian jurisprudence does not treat as a crime a threat that was proffered in a heated discussion.

Germany[edit]

The German Strafgesetzbuch § 241 punishes the crime of threat with a prison term for up to one year or a fine. Even if someone, against his better judgment, feigns to another person that the realization of a serious criminal offense directed against him or a person close to him is imminent, shall be similarly punished.[4]

United States[edit]

In the United States, federal law criminalizes certain true threats transmitted via the U.S. mail[5] or in interstate commerce. It also criminalizes threatening the government officials of the United States. Some U.S. states criminalize cyberbullying.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes

  1. ^ "threat". Oxford English Dictionary (3rd ed.). Oxford University Press. September 2005.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  2. ^ Merriam-Webster Dictionary threat
  3. ^ Phelps and Lehman, Shirelle and Jeffrey (2005). West's Encyclopedia of American Law. Detroit: Gale Virtual Reference Library. p. 27. 
  4. ^ "Criminal Code (Strafgesetzbuch, StGB)". Retrieved April 19, 2014. 
  5. ^ 18 U.S.C. § 876