Threat assessment

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Threat Assessment is the practice of determining the credibility and seriousness of a potential threat, as well as the probability that the threat will become a reality.[1][2][3] Threat assessment is separate to the more established practice of violence-risk assessment, which attempts to predict an individual's general capacity and tendency to react to situations violently. Instead, threat assessment aims to interrupt people on a pathway to commit "predatory or instrumental violence, the type of behavior associated with targeted attacks," according to J. Reid Meloy, PhD, co-editor of the International Handbook of Threat Assessment.[4] "Predatory and affective violence are largely distinctive modes of violence."[5]

Components[edit]

Threat assessment involves three major components:

  • Identification: Identifying threats to commit a potential unfavorable act. Authorities must also convey that tips will be dealt with carefully and responsibly; understanding that people who report threats may fear that they could wrongly implicate someone else, entangle themselves in trouble or both.
  • Assessment: Determining the seriousness of the threat. This could involve security professionals, school counselors, supervisors or human resources managers talking to the person of concern and his or her peers and supervisors, as well as looking to social media sites, to better assess whether or not the person is planning violence, as well as to assess the subject's current life situations.
  • Management: Developing intervention plans to address the underlying issue, such as bullying, anxiety and/or depression, which mental health professionals are trained to handle. In the cases where the assessment reveals a true threat, law enforcement and other professionals develop a plan to disrrupt the potential pathway to violence. In the short term, that could mean alerting potential victims and restraining the subject. In the long term, it means to redirect someone who might be on such a path.

Areas of need[edit]

Threat assessment is relevant to many businesses and other venues, including schools. Threat assessment professionals, who include psychologists and law enforcement agents, work to identify and help potential offenders, guiding students to overcome underlying sources of anger, hopelessness or despair. These feelings can increase a student's risk of suicide, alcohol and drug use, physical abuse, dropping out and criminal activity. Threat assessment also applies to risk management. Information security risk managers often perform a threat assessment before developing a plan to mitigate those threats.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Threat Assessment: Predicting and Preventing School Violence". National Association of School Psychologists. Retrieved 16 October 2014. 
  2. ^ "NATIONAL THREAT ASSESSMENT CENTER". United States Secret Service. Archived from the original on 3 December 2013. Retrieved 16 October 2014. 
  3. ^ Point, Rangoon. "Business Threat Assessment | Rangoon Point". www.rangoonpoint.com. Retrieved 2016-12-02. 
  4. ^ International handbook of threat assessment. Meloy, J. Reid., Hoffmann, Jens, 1968-. Oxford. ISBN 9780199924554. OCLC 855779221. 
  5. ^ "Threat assessment in action". http://www.apa.org. Retrieved 2018-03-17.  External link in |website= (help)
  6. ^ "Overview of Threat Risk Assessment". www.sans.org. Retrieved 2018-01-18.