Three Steps in the Dark

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Three Steps in the Dark
Three-steps-in-the-dark-trailer.jpg
Screenshot from the trailer
Directed by Daniel Birt
Produced by Harold Richmond
Written by Roger East
Brock Williams
Starring Greta Gynt
Hugh Sinclair
Music by Gilbert Vinter
Cinematography Hone Glendinning
Edited by Anne Barker
Distributed by Associated British-Pathé
Release date
  • 1953 (1953)
Running time
61 minutes
Country United Kingdom
Language English

Three Steps in the Dark is a 1953 British B-movie whodunit, directed by Daniel Birt and starring Greta Gynt and Hugh Sinclair.

Plot[edit]

A rich but disliked elderly man invites his relatives to a family reunion at his home. Once the gathering is complete, he announces enigmatically that he intends to change his will before he dies. Before he can do this, he is murdered. His niece (Gynt), a detective story writer, has to put her theories into practice by solving a real-life murder mystery.

Cast[edit]

Later history[edit]

Three Steps in the Dark appears to have been a programmer closely following the standard whodunit template, with Today's Cinema offering the analysis: "The film has a measure of well tried appeal in the matter of 'spotting the killer' and in anticipating the surprise revelation of his identity in the climax. There is the usual touch of romance to complete the formula." There is no indication that the film was ever shown publicly again in cinemas or on television following its initial run.

The British Film Institute included the film on its "75 Most Wanted" list of missing British feature films, due in large part to interest from film historians in Birt's relatively brief directorial career, which was cut short by his death at the age of 47 in 1955.[1] The National Film and Sound Archive in Australia subsequently informed the BFI it has the film.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Three Steps in the Dark / BFI Most Wanted". British Film Institute. Retrieved 4 September 2010. 
  2. ^ Josephine Botting (29 November 2012). "BFI Most Wanted: our discoveries so far". British Film Institute. Retrieved 22 February 2013. 

External links[edit]