Threemilehouse

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Threemilehouse
Teach na dTrí Mhíle
Town
Threemilehouse is located in Ireland
Threemilehouse
Threemilehouse
Location in Ireland
Coordinates: 54°13′00″N 7°02′36″W / 54.216802°N 7.043467°W / 54.216802; -7.043467Coordinates: 54°13′00″N 7°02′36″W / 54.216802°N 7.043467°W / 54.216802; -7.043467
Country Ireland
Province Ulster
County County Monaghan
Population (2006)
 • Total 167
Time zone WET (UTC+0)
 • Summer (DST) IST (WEST) (UTC-1)

Threemilehouse or Three Mile House (Irish: Teach na dTrí Mhíle, meaning "house of three miles") is a village in County Monaghan, Republic of Ireland. It is roughly midway between Monaghan and Newbliss on the R189. The nearest village is Smithborough. It lies[1] mostly within the townlands of Cabragh, Drumguill and Kilnaclay in the parish of Kilmore & Drumsnat. Saint Mary's church and primary school on the hill overlook the village. Threemilehouse has one of the oldest graveyards in the country, Drumsnat, which dates to 600 AD. The Central Statistics Office's report for the 2006 census lists Cabragh as a settlement with a total population of 167.[2]

History[edit]

There was once a monastery founded by St. Molua at nearby Drumsnat. Drumsnat (Drom Sneachta) means the ‘Ridge of Snow’ and, according to tradition, this hill was covered by a mid summer snowfall in answer to the saint’s prayers for a site for a church. The Church of Ireland cemetery also marks the last resting place of Emily and Mary Wilde, the half-sisters of Oscar Wilde, who died following a fire at the nearby Drumaconnor House in 1871 [3][4]

Sport[edit]

Threemilehouse has a Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) football club, Sean Mac Diarmada,[5] who wear yellow and white.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://census.cso.ie/sapmap/Map.aspx?1167%3b733
  2. ^ "Table 5: Population of Towns ordered by County and size, 2002 and 2006" (PDF). 2006 Census Volume 1. Central Statistics Office. 2007. p. 57. Retrieved 7 April 2012. 
  3. ^ Replay, A Parish History, Eamonn Mulligan and Fr. Brian McCluskey, November 1984
  4. ^ http://www.irishidentity.com/extras/gaels/stories/wilde.htm
  5. ^ http://www.seanmcdermotts.net/