Thymidylate synthase (FAD)

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thymidylate synthase (FAD)
5ior.jpg
Flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase tetramer, Thermotoga maritima
Identifiers
EC number 2.1.1.148
Databases
IntEnz IntEnz view
BRENDA BRENDA entry
ExPASy NiceZyme view
KEGG KEGG entry
MetaCyc metabolic pathway
PRIAM profile
PDB structures RCSB PDB PDBe PDBsum
Gene Ontology AmiGO / EGO

In enzymology, a thymidylate synthase (FAD) (EC 2.1.1.148) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate + dUMP + FADH2 dTMP + tetrahydrofolate + FAD

The 3 substrates of this enzyme are 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate, dUMP, and FADH2, whereas its 3 products are dTMP, tetrahydrofolate, and FAD.

This enzyme belongs to the family of transferases, to be specific those transferring one-carbon group methyltransferases. The systematic name of this enzyme class is 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate,FADH2:dUMP C-methyltransferase. Other names in common use include Thy1, and ThyX. This enzyme participates in pyrimidine metabolism and one carbon pool by folate.

Most organisms, including humans, use the thyA- or TYMS-encoded classic thymidylate synthase whereas some bacteria use the similar flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase (FDTS) instead.[1]

Structural studies[edit]

As of late 2007, 3 structures have been solved for this class of enzymes, with PDB accession codes 2AF6, 2CFA, and 2GQ2.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Myllykallio H, Lipowski G, Leduc D, Filee J, Forterre P, Liebl U (2002). "An alternative flavin-dependent mechanism for thymidylate synthesis". Science. 297 (5578): 105–7. doi:10.1126/science.1072113. PMID 12029065.