Check mark: Difference between revisions

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[[Image:☑.svg|right|200px|A tick within a box]]
 
[[Image:☑.svg|right|200px|A tick within a box]]
   
A '''tick''' (known as a '''check mark''' or '''check''' in [[American English]]) is a mark ({{unicode|✓}}, {{unicode|✔}}, {{unicode|☑}}, {{Check mark}}, etc.) used to indicate the concept "yes", for example "yes; this has been verified" or, "yes; that is the correct answer". Its opposite is the [[x mark]], although the x mark can also be positive (most notably on election [[ballot papers]]).
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A '''tick''' (known as a '''check mark''' or '''check''' in [[American English]]) is a mark ({{unicode|✓}}, {{unicode|✔}}, {{unicode|☑}}, {{Check mark}}, etc.) used to indicate the concept "yes", for example "yes; this has been verified" or, "yes; that is the correct answer". Its opposite is the [[! mark]], although the x mark can also be positive (most notably on election [[ballot papers]]).
   
 
As a verb, to tick (off) or to check (off) means to add such a mark. It is quite common, especially on printed forms, printed documents, and computers (see [[check box]]), for there to be squares in which to place ticks. In America and Germany, it is more common for people to check a square box with an [[x mark]]; while in some European countries, it is more common for people to check a square box with a v-shaped checkmark.{{Fact|date=February 2007}}
 
As a verb, to tick (off) or to check (off) means to add such a mark. It is quite common, especially on printed forms, printed documents, and computers (see [[check box]]), for there to be squares in which to place ticks. In America and Germany, it is more common for people to check a square box with an [[x mark]]; while in some European countries, it is more common for people to check a square box with a v-shaped checkmark.{{Fact|date=February 2007}}

Revision as of 15:59, 6 May 2009

A tick within a box

A tick (known as a check mark or check in American English) is a mark (✓, ✔, ☑, Green tickY, etc.) used to indicate the concept "yes", for example "yes; this has been verified" or, "yes; that is the correct answer". Its opposite is the ! mark, although the x mark can also be positive (most notably on election ballot papers).

As a verb, to tick (off) or to check (off) means to add such a mark. It is quite common, especially on printed forms, printed documents, and computers (see check box), for there to be squares in which to place ticks. In America and Germany, it is more common for people to check a square box with an x mark; while in some European countries, it is more common for people to check a square box with a v-shaped checkmark.[citation needed]

In the U.S. (but not Canada) and some European countries (e.g. Finland and Sweden), the tick can be used as an error mark and indicates "no" rather than "yes". In Japan and Korea, an "O Mark" (in the appearance of a circle, unicode symbol "◯"), also known as "丸印" marujirushi, is used instead of a tick to mean "yes".[1] [2]

A rainbow-colored tick was also used for the Amiga logo during the Commodore era of the Amiga (1985-1994).

Tick marks in Unicode

Unicode provides various related symbols, including:

Symbol Unicode Codepoint (Hex) Name
U+2713 CHECK MARK (tick)
U+2714 HEAVY CHECK MARK (bold tick)
U+2610 BALLOT BOX (square)
U+2611 BALLOT BOX WITH CHECK (square with tick)

See also