Tidal strait

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A tidal strait, between two landmasses

A tidal strait is technically not a river but a strait connecting two oceans or seas. Tidal straits are narrow seaways through which tidal currents flow. Tidal currents are usually unidirectional but sometimes are bidirectional. They are frequently of tectonic origin. In them, currents develop because of elevation differences between the water basins at both ends.[1]

Tides sometimes allow sediments to collect in tidal straits.[2][3]

Arthur Kill tidal strait, Prall's Island visible

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Longhitano, Sergio G.; Mellere, Donatella; Steel, Ronald J.; Ainsworth, R. Bruce (April 9, 2012). "Tidal depositional systems in the rock record: A review and new insights" (PDF). basin.earth.ncu.edu.tw. Retrieved 27 May 2019.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  2. ^ Longhitano, Sergio; Steel, Ronald J. (June 2015). "Deltas sourcing tidal straits: observations from some field case studies". Retrieved 27 May 2019.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  3. ^ Rossia, V.M.; Longhitano, S.G.; Mellere, D.; Dalrymple, R.W.; Steela, R.J.; Chiarellae, D.; Olariua, C. (November 2017). "Interplay of tidal and fluvial processes in an early Pleistocene, delta-fed, strait margin (Calabria, Southern Italy)". Marine and Petroleum Geology. Retrieved 27 May 2019.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)

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