Tim Fortugno

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Tim Fortugno
Pitcher
Born: (1962-04-11) April 11, 1962 (age 54)
Clinton, Massachusetts
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
July 20, 1992, for the California Angels
Last MLB appearance
July 26, 1995, for the Chicago White Sox
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 3-4
Saves 1
Earned run average 5.06
Teams

Timothy Shawn Fortugno (born April 11, 1962, in Clinton, Massachusetts) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher and current scout, working for the New York Mets as of July 2015.[1]

He graduated in 1980 from Uxbridge High School (Uxbridge, Massachusetts). Fortugno is an alumnus of Golden West College and Vanguard University of Southern California.

Signed by the Seattle Mariners as an amateur free agent in 1986, Fortugno would make his major league debut at the age of 30 with the California Angels on July 20, 1992, and appear in his final game on July 26, 1995. His last year in professional baseball was in 1998. He played until he was 36 years old, ultimately, venturing into scouting.

Primarily a relief pitcher during his professional career (1986–1997), his first major league win came in his second start. On July 25, 1992, Fortugno surprised the baseball world by hurling a three-hit shutout against the Detroit Tigers, striking out 12.[2] (His only other shutout had been in the minor leagues, pitching a no-hitter for the class A Salinas Spurs in 1987.)[citation needed]

Fortugno's career totals include 76 games pitched (5 starts), 110.1 innings, a 3-4 record with one save, and an ERA of 5.06. Fortugno was the pitcher that yielded the 3,000th hit of future hall of fame member George Brett on September 30, 1992.[3] Shortly after giving up the hit, he picked Brett off at first base.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Danny Knobler (July 24, 2015). "The True Story of Tim Fortugno, the Man Once Traded for a Bucket of Baseballs". Bleacher Report. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  2. ^ Dunn, Richard. "Former Angel pitcher Tim Fortugno took unlikely path to the majors". The Orange County Register. Retrieved 9 February 2017. 
  3. ^ Scacco, Michael (24 Dec 2015). "The 12 most generous trades in sports history". NY Daily News. Retrieved 9 February 2017.