Tim Phillips (political strategist)

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Tim Phillips
Personal details
Occupation President of Americans for Prosperity

Tim Phillips (born July 13, 1964) is the president of Americans for Prosperity (AFP) and an early Tea Party movement organizer.[1][2][3][4] Prior to joining AFP, Phillips was a Republican campaign strategist.[5]

Personal life[edit]

Phillips grew up in Spartanburg, South Carolina. After briefly attending Liberty University in 1983, he went to Washington D.C. as part of a school sponsored internship with the United States Department of Education. There he met fellow intern Julia Reider Phillips, whom he later married. The couple has four children.

Phillips completed his education in 1985 as a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Virginia Tech, graduating magna cum laude with a B.A. in Political Science.[6]


Phillips was chief of staff to United States House of Representatives member Bob Goodlatte of Virginia. Phillips co-founded political consulting firm Century Strategies with political strategist Ralph Reed.[7][8]

In 2005, Phillips was hired to lead Americans for Prosperity, a conservative political advocacy group active in building the Tea Party movement.[8]


  1. ^ "Arena Profile: Tim Phillips". The Arena (Politico). Retrieved 29 October 2015. 
  2. ^ "Americans for Prosperity". factcheck.org. October 10, 2011. Retrieved September 8, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Tea party organizer: 'A freedom movement'". CNN. September 24, 2012. Retrieved September 8, 2014. 
  4. ^ "The Tea Party Is Outside Your House". Slate. Retrieved September 8, 2014. 
  5. ^ "Michael Needham & Tim Phillips". The Politico 50 (Politico Magazine). Retrieved 29 October 2015. 
  6. ^ "Timothy R. Phillips". Century Strategies. Archived from the original on 2004-06-03. 
  7. ^ Sonmez, Felicia (August 26, 2010). "Who is Americans for Prosperity?". Washington Post. Retrieved March 23, 2015. 
  8. ^ a b Rutenberg, Jim (October 17, 2014). "How Billionaire Oligarchs Are Becoming Their Own Political Parties". New York Times Magazine. Retrieved March 23, 2015. 

External links[edit]