Tim Pratt

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Tim Pratt
BornDecember 12, 1976 (1976-12-12) (age 43)
Dudley, North Carolina
Pen nameT. A. Pratt, T. Aaron Payton
OccupationAuthor, editor at Locus Magazine
GenreScience fiction, fantasy
Website
www.timpratt.org

Tim Pratt (born December 12, 1976) is an American science fiction and fantasy writer and poet. He won a Hugo Award in 2007 for his short story "Impossible Dreams".[1] He's written over 20 books, including the Marla Mason series and several Pathfinder Tales novels. His writing has earned him nominations for Nebula, Mythopoeic, World Fantasy, and Bram Stoker awards and been published in numerous markets, including Asimov's Science Fiction, Realms of Fantasy, Orson Scott Card's InterGalactic Medicine Show, and Strange Horizons.[2]

Life and career[edit]

Pratt grew up in the vicinity of Dudley, North Carolina, and attended Appalachian State University, where he earned a Bachelor's degree in English. In 1999 he attended the Clarion East Writing Workshop.[3] He moved to Santa Cruz, California in 2000, and now resides in Berkeley with his wife, Heather Shaw, and son, River.[4] He currently works as a senior editor at Locus Magazine.

He has also contributed to the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) Collection archived at the Northern Illinois University Libraries.[5]

In 2018, the performance of his short story "Six Jobs" at Podcastle won (and declined[6]) the Parsec award for Best Speculative Fiction Story: Small Cast (Short Form).

Bibliography[edit]

Novels[edit]

Tim Pratt's first book, The Strange Adventures of Rangergirl
Tim Pratt's first book, The Strange Adventures of Rangergirl

As Tim Pratt[edit]

  • The Strange Adventures of Rangergirl, Bantam Spectra, 2005
  • The Nex, Tropism Press, 2010
  • Briarpatch, ChiZine Publications, 2011
  • Venom in Her Veins: A Forgotten Realms Novel, Wizards of the Coast, 2012
  • Pathfinder Tales: City of the Fallen Sky, Paizo Publishing, 2012
  • Pathfinder Tales: Liar's Blade, Paizo Publishing, 2013
  • The Stormglass Protocol, 2013 (with Andy Deemer)
  • Heirs of Grace, 47North, 2014
  • Pathfinder Tales: Reign of Stars, Paizo Publishing, 2014
  • Pathfinder Tales: Liar's Island, Paizo Publishing, 2015
  • Pathfinder Tales: Liar's Bargain, Paizo Publishing, 2016
  • The Wrong Stars: Book I of the Axiom, Angry Robot, 2017
  • The Dreaming Stars: Book II of the Axiom, Angry Robot, 2018
  • The Forbidden Stars: Book III of the Axiom, Angry Robot, 2019
Blood Engines, the first book in the Marla Mason series
Blood Engines, the first book in the Marla Mason series

As T.A. Pratt (Marla Mason novels)[edit]

  • Blood Engines (#1), Bantam Spectra, 2007
  • Poison Sleep (#2), Bantam Spectra, 2008
  • Dead Reign (#3), Bantam Spectra, 2008
  • Spell Games (#4), Bantam Spectra, 2009
  • Broken Mirrors (#5), 2010
  • Grim Tides (#6), 2012
  • Bride of Death (#7), 2013
  • Lady of Misrule (#8), 2015
  • Queen of Nothing (#9), 2015
  • Closing Doors (#10), 2017
  • Do Better: The Marla Mason Stories, 2018

As T. Aaron Payton[edit]

Collections[edit]

  • Little Gods, Prime Books, 2003
  • If There Were Wolves (poetry), Prime Books, 2006
  • Hart & Boot & Other Stories, Night Shade Books, 2007
  • Antiquities and Tangibles & Other Stories, Merry Blacksmith, 2013
  • The Christmas Mummy and Other Carols, 2017 (with Heather Shaw)

Edited Anthologies[edit]

  • Sympathy for the Devil, Night Shade Books, 2010
  • Rags and Bones: New Twists on Timeless Tales, Little Brown, 2013 (with Melissa Marr)

Awards and nominations[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "2007 Hugo Awards". The Hugo Awards. 2007-08-09. Retrieved 2019-10-26.
  2. ^ "sfadb : Tim Pratt Awards". www.sfadb.com. Retrieved 2019-11-17.
  3. ^ "Tim Pratt » Bio". Retrieved 2019-11-17.
  4. ^ admin (2016-04-24). "Tim Pratt: Closing Doors". Locus Online. Retrieved 2019-11-04.
  5. ^ "Rare Books and Special Collections - Special Collections / Science Fiction & Fantasy". Northern Illinois University. Retrieved 2019-11-04.
  6. ^ "PodCastle has won, and is declining, the Parsec Award". PodCastle. 2018-12-20. Retrieved 2019-11-04.
  7. ^ "Philip K. Dick Award Nominees Announced". Philip K. Dick Award. Retrieved 2019-11-24.
  8. ^ "Gunn Center for the Study of Science Fiction News and Events". Gunn Center for the Study of Science Fiction. Retrieved 2019-11-24.
  9. ^ "2008 Bram Stoker Award Winners & Nominees – The Bram Stoker Awards". Retrieved 2019-11-17.
  10. ^ "Nominees | World Fantasy Convention". Retrieved 2019-11-17.
  11. ^ "sfadb : Emperor Norton Award". www.sfadb.com. Retrieved 2019-11-24.
  12. ^ "The Mythopoeic Society - Mythopoeic Awards 2006". www.mythsoc.org. Retrieved 2019-11-24.
  13. ^ "Gaylactic Spectrum Awards - 2006 Information". www.spectrumawards.org. Retrieved 2019-11-24.
  14. ^ "Science Fiction Poetry Association". www.sfpoetry.com. Retrieved 2019-11-24.
  15. ^ "sfadb: Rhysling Awards 2005". www.sfadb.com. Retrieved 2019-11-24.
  16. ^ a b "Gaylactic Spectrum Awards - 2004 Information". www.spectrumawards.org. Retrieved 2019-11-24.
  17. ^ "Astounding Award". The Hugo Awards. 2007-08-09. Retrieved 2019-11-24.
  18. ^ Fictions, © 2019 Science; America, Fantasy Writers of; SFWA®, Inc; Fiction, Nebula Awards® are registered trademarks of Science; America, Fantasy Writers of; SFWA, Inc Opinions expressed on this web site are not necessarily those of. "2002". The Nebula Awards®. Retrieved 2019-11-24.