Tim Renton

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The Lord Renton of Mount Harry

Minister for the Arts
In office
28 November 1990 – 11 April 1992
Prime MinisterJohn Major
Preceded byDavid Mellor
Succeeded byDavid Mellor (as Secretary of State for National Heritage)
Chief Whip of the House of Commons
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury
In office
24 July 1989 – 28 November 1990
Prime MinisterMargaret Thatcher
Preceded byDavid Waddington
Succeeded byRichard Ryder
Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs
In office
2 September 1985 – 13 June 1987
Prime MinisterMargaret Thatcher
Preceded byRichard Luce
Succeeded byDavid Mellor
Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs
In office
11 September 1984 – 1 September 1985
Prime MinisterMargaret Thatcher
Preceded byRay Whitney
Succeeded byTim Eggar
Member of Parliament
for Mid Sussex
In office
28 February 1974 – 1 May 1997
Preceded byConstituency Created
Succeeded byNicholas Soames
Personal details
Born (1932-05-28) 28 May 1932 (age 87)
Political partyConservative
Alma materMagdalen College, Oxford

Ronald Timothy Renton, Baron Renton of Mount Harry, PC (born 28 May 1932) is a British Conservative Party politician.

Early life[edit]

Tim Renton, who rarely uses his first name of Ronald, won scholarships to Eton College and Magdalen College, Oxford, and graduated with a first class degree in History.

Parliamentary career[edit]

After unsuccessfully contesting Sheffield Park in 1970, he was Conservative Member of Parliament for Mid-Sussex from 1974 to 1997.

He served as a Minister of State in both the Foreign Office and the Home Office, and served as Margaret Thatcher's Chief Whip (Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury) between 1989 and 1990. After Thatcher's resignation in 1990 he served in John Major's government as Minister for the Arts between 1990 and 1992.

After standing down from the Commons at the 1997 General Election, he was created a life peer in the 1997 Dissolution Honours;[1] on 9 June 1997 as Baron Renton of Mount Harry, of Offham in the County of East Sussex,[2][3] and took his seat in the House of Lords. He retired from the House on 14 April 2016.[4]

Styles of address[edit]

  • 1932–1974: Mr Tim Renton
  • 1974–1989: Mr Tim Renton MP
  • 1989–1997: The Rt Hon. Tim Renton MP
  • 1997: The Rt Hon. Tim Renton
  • 1997–: The Rt Hon. The Lord Renton of Mount Harry PC

Family[edit]

In 1960, he married Alice Blanche Helen Fergusson, daughter of Sir James Fergusson, 8th Baronet of Kilkerran. The couple live in Offham near Lewes in East Sussex and have a holiday home on the Hebridean island of Tiree.

Their four surviving children are Alexander James Torre (a journalist and author),[5] Christian Louise, Daniel Charles Antony and (Katherine) Chelsea, who is an artist. The couple's youngest daughter, Polly (Penelope Sally Rosita), a documentary film maker, died in a car accident in 2010.[5]

Bibliography[edit]

  • The Dangerous Edge, Hutchinson, 1994, ISBN 0-09-179151-0
  • Hostage to Fortune, Arrow, 1998, ISBN 0-09-946831-X
  • Chief Whip, Politico's, 2005, ISBN 1-84275-129-8

References[edit]

  1. ^ "No. 54743". The London Gazette (Supplement). 18 April 1997. p. 4708.
  2. ^ "No. 54791". The London Gazette. 12 June 1997. p. 6845.
  3. ^ "No. 24212". The Edinburgh Gazette. 17 June 1997. p. 1485.
  4. ^ Lord Renton of Mount Harry – UK Parliament
  5. ^ a b Obituary: Polly Renton, The Times, 10 June 2010
Parliament of the United Kingdom
New constituency Member of Parliament for Mid Sussex
19741997
Succeeded by
Nicholas Soames
Political offices
Preceded by
David Waddington
Chief Whip of the Conservative Party
1989–1990
Succeeded by
Richard Ryder
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury
1989–1990
Preceded by
David Mellor
Minister of State for the Arts
1990–1992
Succeeded by
David Mellor