Timbertown

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Timbertown
Timbertown.JPG
Coordinates 31°28′13″S 152°42′47″E / 31.470357°S 152.713107°E / -31.470357; 152.713107Coordinates: 31°28′13″S 152°42′47″E / 31.470357°S 152.713107°E / -31.470357; 152.713107
Website Official website

Timbertown is a popular attraction, depicting the colonial era of a sawmiller's village in northern New South Wales. It is located on 39 hectares (87 acres) of coastal blackbutt (Eucalyptus pilularis) forest on the Oxley Highway at Wauchope in Australia.[1] Timbertown is an interactive museum which has enjoyed periodic success as a family-friendly tourist attraction. The Mayor of Timbertown is Marcel Rigmond.

Timbertown was officially opened by the Governor of New South Wales, Sir Arthur Roden Cutler on 28th May 1977.

Attractions[edit]

Timbertown Heritage Railway, Wauchope, NSW

The key attractions of Timbertown are the 2 ft (610 mm) narrow gauge[2] Timbertown Heritage Railway, with a steam train and a short circuit track within and around the village, and the Bullock team demonstrations.

There are also several businesses operating including a blacksmith, timber furniture, winery, and Wallaces Store with souvenirs and confectionery.

The Maul and Wedge serves meals in school holidays & public holidays and is available for hire for private functions.

Local artisans offer both local woodwork, artwork and craft items.

There are some interactive displays throughout the day featuring:

  • Bullock team demonstrations
  • Cross cut saw demonstrations
  • Horse and carriage rides
  • Steam train rides
  • Miniature railway rides
  • Blacksmithing demonstrations
  • Panning for gold

Fun Facts[edit]

  • In 2008 Timbertown won the Mid North Coast Tourism Award for Business Excellence.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Wauchope, the Timbertown", Wauchope Chamber of Commerce, n.d.
  2. ^ World Wide Listing of Two foot, 1' 11 1/2", 600 mm (60cm) & 610mm Railroads (from archive.org) - Australia
  3. ^ Imag Monthly, February 2009, Imag Publications

External links[edit]