Time in Michigan

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All counties in Michigan's Lower Peninsula observe Eastern Time, as do most counties in the state's Upper Peninsula. The U.P. counties that do not, the four counties which have a land border with Wisconsin, are in the Central Time zone.

History[edit]

Before time zones were introduced, every place used local observation of the sun to set their clocks, which means they used local mean time, every city different based on their longitude. Detroit used 05:32:11 west of Greenwich and Menominee 05:51:31 west of Greenwich.

Time zones were introduced in the United States in 1883. This was in introduced in different years based on local decisions. Detroit introduced Central time on January 1, 1905.[1] and Menominee on 18 September 18, 1885.[2] Later Detroit and most of Michigan changed to Eastern time.

In 1967, when the Uniform Time Act came into effect, the Upper Peninsula went under year-round CST, with no daylight saving time.[3] In 1973, the majority of the peninsula switched to Eastern Time;[4] only the four western counties of Gogebic, Iron, Dickinson, and Menominee continue to observe Central Time.

IANA time zone database[edit]

The zone for Michigan as given by zone.tab of the IANA time zone database[5]


c.c. coordinates TZ comments UTC offset UTC offset DST Note
US +421953-0830245 America/Detroit Eastern Time - Michigan - most locations −05:00 −04:00
US +450628-0873651 America/Menominee Central Time - Michigan - Dickinson, Gogebic, Iron & Menominee Counties −06:00 −05:00 Was used statewide from January 1, 1905 until May 15, 1915. This was prior to the advent of DST, so UTC-6 was used all year long

References[edit]

  1. ^ Time Zones - Detroit
  2. ^ Time Zones - Menominee
  3. ^ "State Constitutions: Referendum Row". Time. July 7, 1967. Retrieved July 25, 2007. 
  4. ^ Law, Gwillim (February 19, 2007). "United States Time Zones". Statoids. Retrieved July 25, 2007. 
  5. ^ http://www.iana.org/time-zones

See also[edit]